Correlations among critical closing pressure, pulsatility index and cerebrovascular resistance

Hung Yi Hsu, Chang Ming Chern, Jon Son Kuo, Terry Bo Jau Kuo, Ying Tsung Chen, Han Haw Hu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We attempted to explore the relationships among critical closing pressure (CrCP), resistance-area product (RAP) and traditional resistance indices of cerebral hemodynamics. Twenty healthy volunteers were studied. Blood pressure was obtained with servo-controlled plethysmography. Cerebral blood flow velocity (CBFV) was monitored by transcranial Doppler. Hemodynamic changes were induced by hyperventilation and by 5% CO 2 inhalation. Beat-to-beat CrCP and RAP values were extracted by linear regression analysis of instantaneous arterial blood pressure (ABP) and CBFV tracings. Gosling's pulsatility index (PI) and cerebrovascular resistance (CVR) were calculated. RAP correlated well with CVR at rest and during provocative tests (p = 0.006 ∼ <0.001). There was no correlation among CrCP, CVR and PI. The changes in CVR correlated with those in RAP (p = 0.008 for the 5% CO 2 test and p = 0.014 for the hyperventilation test). The changes in PI and CrCP showed significant correlation (p = 0.004 for the 5% CO 2 test and p = 0.003 for the hyperventilation test). RAP reliably reflected cerebrovascular resistance. The changes in CrCP were valuable in assessing cerebrovascular regulation. Estimating changes in CrCP and RAP provided better understanding of the nature of cerebrovascular regulation. (hhhu@vghtpe.gov.tw)

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1329-1335
Number of pages7
JournalUltrasound in Medicine and Biology
Volume30
Issue number10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2004
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

closing
Pressure
Hyperventilation
Cerebrovascular Circulation
Carbon Monoxide
hyperventilation
Blood Flow Velocity
products
Hemodynamics
blood pressure
hemodynamics
Plethysmography
blood flow
Inhalation
Linear Models
synchronism
plethysmography
Healthy Volunteers
Arterial Pressure
flow velocity

Keywords

  • Carbon dioxide
  • cerebrovascular resistance
  • critical closing pressure
  • Doppler
  • pulsatility index
  • transcranial
  • ultrasonography

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging

Cite this

Correlations among critical closing pressure, pulsatility index and cerebrovascular resistance. / Hsu, Hung Yi; Chern, Chang Ming; Kuo, Jon Son; Kuo, Terry Bo Jau; Chen, Ying Tsung; Hu, Han Haw.

In: Ultrasound in Medicine and Biology, Vol. 30, No. 10, 10.2004, p. 1329-1335.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hsu, Hung Yi ; Chern, Chang Ming ; Kuo, Jon Son ; Kuo, Terry Bo Jau ; Chen, Ying Tsung ; Hu, Han Haw. / Correlations among critical closing pressure, pulsatility index and cerebrovascular resistance. In: Ultrasound in Medicine and Biology. 2004 ; Vol. 30, No. 10. pp. 1329-1335.
@article{a0cfa954c18d485796bf0508ab12abac,
title = "Correlations among critical closing pressure, pulsatility index and cerebrovascular resistance",
abstract = "We attempted to explore the relationships among critical closing pressure (CrCP), resistance-area product (RAP) and traditional resistance indices of cerebral hemodynamics. Twenty healthy volunteers were studied. Blood pressure was obtained with servo-controlled plethysmography. Cerebral blood flow velocity (CBFV) was monitored by transcranial Doppler. Hemodynamic changes were induced by hyperventilation and by 5{\%} CO 2 inhalation. Beat-to-beat CrCP and RAP values were extracted by linear regression analysis of instantaneous arterial blood pressure (ABP) and CBFV tracings. Gosling's pulsatility index (PI) and cerebrovascular resistance (CVR) were calculated. RAP correlated well with CVR at rest and during provocative tests (p = 0.006 ∼ <0.001). There was no correlation among CrCP, CVR and PI. The changes in CVR correlated with those in RAP (p = 0.008 for the 5{\%} CO 2 test and p = 0.014 for the hyperventilation test). The changes in PI and CrCP showed significant correlation (p = 0.004 for the 5{\%} CO 2 test and p = 0.003 for the hyperventilation test). RAP reliably reflected cerebrovascular resistance. The changes in CrCP were valuable in assessing cerebrovascular regulation. Estimating changes in CrCP and RAP provided better understanding of the nature of cerebrovascular regulation. (hhhu@vghtpe.gov.tw)",
keywords = "Carbon dioxide, cerebrovascular resistance, critical closing pressure, Doppler, pulsatility index, transcranial, ultrasonography",
author = "Hsu, {Hung Yi} and Chern, {Chang Ming} and Kuo, {Jon Son} and Kuo, {Terry Bo Jau} and Chen, {Ying Tsung} and Hu, {Han Haw}",
year = "2004",
month = "10",
doi = "10.1016/j.ultrasmedbio.2004.08.006",
language = "English",
volume = "30",
pages = "1329--1335",
journal = "Ultrasound in Medicine and Biology",
issn = "0301-5629",
publisher = "Elsevier USA",
number = "10",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Correlations among critical closing pressure, pulsatility index and cerebrovascular resistance

AU - Hsu, Hung Yi

AU - Chern, Chang Ming

AU - Kuo, Jon Son

AU - Kuo, Terry Bo Jau

AU - Chen, Ying Tsung

AU - Hu, Han Haw

PY - 2004/10

Y1 - 2004/10

N2 - We attempted to explore the relationships among critical closing pressure (CrCP), resistance-area product (RAP) and traditional resistance indices of cerebral hemodynamics. Twenty healthy volunteers were studied. Blood pressure was obtained with servo-controlled plethysmography. Cerebral blood flow velocity (CBFV) was monitored by transcranial Doppler. Hemodynamic changes were induced by hyperventilation and by 5% CO 2 inhalation. Beat-to-beat CrCP and RAP values were extracted by linear regression analysis of instantaneous arterial blood pressure (ABP) and CBFV tracings. Gosling's pulsatility index (PI) and cerebrovascular resistance (CVR) were calculated. RAP correlated well with CVR at rest and during provocative tests (p = 0.006 ∼ <0.001). There was no correlation among CrCP, CVR and PI. The changes in CVR correlated with those in RAP (p = 0.008 for the 5% CO 2 test and p = 0.014 for the hyperventilation test). The changes in PI and CrCP showed significant correlation (p = 0.004 for the 5% CO 2 test and p = 0.003 for the hyperventilation test). RAP reliably reflected cerebrovascular resistance. The changes in CrCP were valuable in assessing cerebrovascular regulation. Estimating changes in CrCP and RAP provided better understanding of the nature of cerebrovascular regulation. (hhhu@vghtpe.gov.tw)

AB - We attempted to explore the relationships among critical closing pressure (CrCP), resistance-area product (RAP) and traditional resistance indices of cerebral hemodynamics. Twenty healthy volunteers were studied. Blood pressure was obtained with servo-controlled plethysmography. Cerebral blood flow velocity (CBFV) was monitored by transcranial Doppler. Hemodynamic changes were induced by hyperventilation and by 5% CO 2 inhalation. Beat-to-beat CrCP and RAP values were extracted by linear regression analysis of instantaneous arterial blood pressure (ABP) and CBFV tracings. Gosling's pulsatility index (PI) and cerebrovascular resistance (CVR) were calculated. RAP correlated well with CVR at rest and during provocative tests (p = 0.006 ∼ <0.001). There was no correlation among CrCP, CVR and PI. The changes in CVR correlated with those in RAP (p = 0.008 for the 5% CO 2 test and p = 0.014 for the hyperventilation test). The changes in PI and CrCP showed significant correlation (p = 0.004 for the 5% CO 2 test and p = 0.003 for the hyperventilation test). RAP reliably reflected cerebrovascular resistance. The changes in CrCP were valuable in assessing cerebrovascular regulation. Estimating changes in CrCP and RAP provided better understanding of the nature of cerebrovascular regulation. (hhhu@vghtpe.gov.tw)

KW - Carbon dioxide

KW - cerebrovascular resistance

KW - critical closing pressure

KW - Doppler

KW - pulsatility index

KW - transcranial

KW - ultrasonography

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=9644310482&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=9644310482&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.ultrasmedbio.2004.08.006

DO - 10.1016/j.ultrasmedbio.2004.08.006

M3 - Article

VL - 30

SP - 1329

EP - 1335

JO - Ultrasound in Medicine and Biology

JF - Ultrasound in Medicine and Biology

SN - 0301-5629

IS - 10

ER -