Continuing hospice care of cancer--a three-year experience

Y. L. Lai, A. Young, E. Y. Lai, C. Y. Yeh, J. F. Chiou, K. H. Chang, C. H. Chung, A. L. Hsieh

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The hospice at Mackay Memorial Hospital was established in February 1990. A group of team workers including physicians, nurses, social workers and the clergy were involved in this holistic care program for terminal cancer patients. Four hundred and seventy-nine patients were eligible for the program up to February 1993. Regarding duration of stay, 62.5% of patients resided for 14 days. Those surviving under 90 days constituted 75.5% of patients. Fifty-one point eight percent of patients died in the hospice and 18.2% died at home soon after being discharged from the hospice. Pain is the most common symptom among the patients. Treatment strategies vary according to the three-step-ladder protocol designed by WHO. Total pain relief was achieved in 80% of patients. Opportune private talking and family conferences formed the basis of the "peer model". Through this model, treatment decisions including physical, psychosocial and spiritual issues were made. Before the peer model, only 36 (10.3%) patients agreed with the idea of hospice care, while 257 (73.6%) patients agreed after the model was established. Awareness of dying was evident in 412 (86%) patients. Two hundred and eighty (68%) patients became aware of the prospect of death through guessing, while the other 132 (32%) patients were informed by medical staff. Problems encountered by the team workers included 1) needs in education and training, 2) psychological pressure, 3) management of loss and grief, 4) needs in supportive system and 5) troubles caused by families' lying to patients. The team workers were satisfied with the quality of care in 38.4% of patients and fairly satisfied with 30.7% of patients.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of the Formosan Medical Association = Taiwan yi zhi
Volume93 Suppl 2
Publication statusPublished - Sep 1994
Externally publishedYes

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Hospice Care
Neoplasms
Hospices
Clergy
Pain
Terminal Care
Grief
Quality of Health Care
Medical Staff

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Lai, Y. L., Young, A., Lai, E. Y., Yeh, C. Y., Chiou, J. F., Chang, K. H., ... Hsieh, A. L. (1994). Continuing hospice care of cancer--a three-year experience. Journal of the Formosan Medical Association = Taiwan yi zhi, 93 Suppl 2.

Continuing hospice care of cancer--a three-year experience. / Lai, Y. L.; Young, A.; Lai, E. Y.; Yeh, C. Y.; Chiou, J. F.; Chang, K. H.; Chung, C. H.; Hsieh, A. L.

In: Journal of the Formosan Medical Association = Taiwan yi zhi, Vol. 93 Suppl 2, 09.1994.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lai, YL, Young, A, Lai, EY, Yeh, CY, Chiou, JF, Chang, KH, Chung, CH & Hsieh, AL 1994, 'Continuing hospice care of cancer--a three-year experience', Journal of the Formosan Medical Association = Taiwan yi zhi, vol. 93 Suppl 2.
Lai, Y. L. ; Young, A. ; Lai, E. Y. ; Yeh, C. Y. ; Chiou, J. F. ; Chang, K. H. ; Chung, C. H. ; Hsieh, A. L. / Continuing hospice care of cancer--a three-year experience. In: Journal of the Formosan Medical Association = Taiwan yi zhi. 1994 ; Vol. 93 Suppl 2.
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