Consumption of non-nutritive sweetener, acesulfame potassium exacerbates atherosclerosis through dysregulation of lipid metabolism in apoe−/− mice

Cheng Hsin Lin, Hung Yuan Li, Shu Huei Wang, Yue Hwa Chen, Yang Ching Chen, Hung Tsung Wu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Obesity is associated with the risk of cardiovascular disease, and non-nutritive sweetener, such as acesulfame potassium (AceK) has been used to combat obesity. However, the effects of AceK on cardiovascular disease are still unclear. In this study, high cholesterol diet (HCD)-fed ApoE−/− mice had dysregulated plasma lipid profile, and developed atherosclerosis, determined by atherosclerotic plaque in the aorta. Supplement of AceK in HCD worsened the dyslipidemia and increased atherosclerotic plaque, as compared with HCD-fed ApoE−/− mice. Since treatment of AceK in RAW264.7 macrophages showed no significant effects on inflammatory cytokine expressions, we then investigated the impacts of AceK on lipid metabolism. We found that AceK consumption enhanced hepatic lipogenesis and decreased β-oxidation in ApoE−/− mice. In addition, AceK directly increased lipogenesis and decreased β-oxidation in HepG2 cells. Taken together, a concurrent consumption of AceK exacerbated HCD-induced dyslipidemia and atherosclerotic lesion in ApoE−/− mice, and AceK might increase the risk of atherosclerosis under HCD.

Original languageEnglish
Article number3984
JournalNutrients
Volume13
Issue number11
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 2021

Keywords

  • Acesulfame potassium
  • Apolipoprotein E
  • Atherosclerosis
  • Dysregulation
  • Lipid metabolism

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Food Science
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

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