Consumption of lycopene inhibits the growth and progression of colon cancer in a mouse xenograft model

Feng Yao Tang, Man Hui Pai, Xiang Dong Wang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

33 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A previous study indicated that lycopene could significantly inhibit the proliferation of human colon cancer cells in vitro. However, the in vivo anticancer effects of lycopene against colon cancer have not been demonstrated yet. Therefore, this study investigated whether consumption of lycopene could prevent the growth and progression of colorectal tumor in a mouse xenograft model. Bioluminescence imaging, histopathological, immunofluorescence (IFC), and immunohistochemical (IHC) staining results indicated that lycopene could effectively suppress the growth and progression of colon cancer in tumor-bearing mice. The results demonstrated that lycopene significantly suppressed the nuclear expression of PCNA and β-catenin proteins in tumor tissues. Consumption of lycopene could also augment the E-cadherin adherent molecule and nuclear levels of cell cycle inhibitor p21 CIP1/WAF1 protein. The chemopreventive effects of lycopene were associated with suppression of COX-2, PGE 2, and phosphorylated ERK1/2 proteins. Furthermore, the inhibitory effects of lycopene were inversely correlated with the plasma levels of matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9) in tumor-bearing mice. These results suggested that lycopene could act as a chemopreventive agent against the growth and progression of colorectal cancer in a mouse xenograft model.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)9011-9021
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry
Volume59
Issue number16
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Aug 24 2011

Fingerprint

lycopene
colorectal neoplasms
Heterografts
Colonic Neoplasms
animal models
Growth
Tumors
Bearings (structural)
neoplasms
Colorectal Neoplasms
Cells
Bioluminescence
Catenins
Neoplasms
gelatinase B
bioluminescence
proteins
cadherins
Matrix Metalloproteinase 9
mice

Keywords

  • β-catenin
  • human colon cancer cells
  • lycopene
  • matrix metalloproteinase 9
  • proliferating cell nuclear antigen
  • tumor growth

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • Chemistry(all)

Cite this

Consumption of lycopene inhibits the growth and progression of colon cancer in a mouse xenograft model. / Tang, Feng Yao; Pai, Man Hui; Wang, Xiang Dong.

In: Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, Vol. 59, No. 16, 24.08.2011, p. 9011-9021.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{50a0b29db03a4e81aa4288686d98dea5,
title = "Consumption of lycopene inhibits the growth and progression of colon cancer in a mouse xenograft model",
abstract = "A previous study indicated that lycopene could significantly inhibit the proliferation of human colon cancer cells in vitro. However, the in vivo anticancer effects of lycopene against colon cancer have not been demonstrated yet. Therefore, this study investigated whether consumption of lycopene could prevent the growth and progression of colorectal tumor in a mouse xenograft model. Bioluminescence imaging, histopathological, immunofluorescence (IFC), and immunohistochemical (IHC) staining results indicated that lycopene could effectively suppress the growth and progression of colon cancer in tumor-bearing mice. The results demonstrated that lycopene significantly suppressed the nuclear expression of PCNA and β-catenin proteins in tumor tissues. Consumption of lycopene could also augment the E-cadherin adherent molecule and nuclear levels of cell cycle inhibitor p21 CIP1/WAF1 protein. The chemopreventive effects of lycopene were associated with suppression of COX-2, PGE 2, and phosphorylated ERK1/2 proteins. Furthermore, the inhibitory effects of lycopene were inversely correlated with the plasma levels of matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9) in tumor-bearing mice. These results suggested that lycopene could act as a chemopreventive agent against the growth and progression of colorectal cancer in a mouse xenograft model.",
keywords = "β-catenin, human colon cancer cells, lycopene, matrix metalloproteinase 9, proliferating cell nuclear antigen, tumor growth",
author = "Tang, {Feng Yao} and Pai, {Man Hui} and Wang, {Xiang Dong}",
year = "2011",
month = "8",
day = "24",
doi = "10.1021/jf2017644",
language = "English",
volume = "59",
pages = "9011--9021",
journal = "Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry",
issn = "0021-8561",
publisher = "American Chemical Society",
number = "16",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Consumption of lycopene inhibits the growth and progression of colon cancer in a mouse xenograft model

AU - Tang, Feng Yao

AU - Pai, Man Hui

AU - Wang, Xiang Dong

PY - 2011/8/24

Y1 - 2011/8/24

N2 - A previous study indicated that lycopene could significantly inhibit the proliferation of human colon cancer cells in vitro. However, the in vivo anticancer effects of lycopene against colon cancer have not been demonstrated yet. Therefore, this study investigated whether consumption of lycopene could prevent the growth and progression of colorectal tumor in a mouse xenograft model. Bioluminescence imaging, histopathological, immunofluorescence (IFC), and immunohistochemical (IHC) staining results indicated that lycopene could effectively suppress the growth and progression of colon cancer in tumor-bearing mice. The results demonstrated that lycopene significantly suppressed the nuclear expression of PCNA and β-catenin proteins in tumor tissues. Consumption of lycopene could also augment the E-cadherin adherent molecule and nuclear levels of cell cycle inhibitor p21 CIP1/WAF1 protein. The chemopreventive effects of lycopene were associated with suppression of COX-2, PGE 2, and phosphorylated ERK1/2 proteins. Furthermore, the inhibitory effects of lycopene were inversely correlated with the plasma levels of matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9) in tumor-bearing mice. These results suggested that lycopene could act as a chemopreventive agent against the growth and progression of colorectal cancer in a mouse xenograft model.

AB - A previous study indicated that lycopene could significantly inhibit the proliferation of human colon cancer cells in vitro. However, the in vivo anticancer effects of lycopene against colon cancer have not been demonstrated yet. Therefore, this study investigated whether consumption of lycopene could prevent the growth and progression of colorectal tumor in a mouse xenograft model. Bioluminescence imaging, histopathological, immunofluorescence (IFC), and immunohistochemical (IHC) staining results indicated that lycopene could effectively suppress the growth and progression of colon cancer in tumor-bearing mice. The results demonstrated that lycopene significantly suppressed the nuclear expression of PCNA and β-catenin proteins in tumor tissues. Consumption of lycopene could also augment the E-cadherin adherent molecule and nuclear levels of cell cycle inhibitor p21 CIP1/WAF1 protein. The chemopreventive effects of lycopene were associated with suppression of COX-2, PGE 2, and phosphorylated ERK1/2 proteins. Furthermore, the inhibitory effects of lycopene were inversely correlated with the plasma levels of matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9) in tumor-bearing mice. These results suggested that lycopene could act as a chemopreventive agent against the growth and progression of colorectal cancer in a mouse xenograft model.

KW - β-catenin

KW - human colon cancer cells

KW - lycopene

KW - matrix metalloproteinase 9

KW - proliferating cell nuclear antigen

KW - tumor growth

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=80051743214&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=80051743214&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1021/jf2017644

DO - 10.1021/jf2017644

M3 - Article

C2 - 21744871

AN - SCOPUS:80051743214

VL - 59

SP - 9011

EP - 9021

JO - Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry

JF - Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry

SN - 0021-8561

IS - 16

ER -