Comparisons of differentiation potential in human mesenchymal stem cells from Wharton's jelly, bone marrow, and pancreatic tissues

Shih Yi Kao, Jia Fwu Shyu, Hwai Shi Wang, Chi Hung Lin, Cheng Hsi Su, Tien Hua Chen, Zen Chung Weng, Pei Jiun Tsai

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background. Type 1 diabetes mellitus results from autoimmune destruction of β-cells. Insulin-producing cells (IPCs) differentiated from mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in human tissues decrease blood glucose levels and improve survival in diabetic rats. We compared the differential ability and the curative effect of IPCs from three types of human tissue to determine the ideal source of cell therapy for diabetes. Methods. We induced MSCs from Wharton's jelly (WJ), bone marrow (BM), and surgically resected pancreatic tissue to differentiate into IPCs. The in vitro differential function of these IPCs was compared by insulin-to-DNA ratios and C-peptide levels after glucose challenge. In vivo curative effects of IPCs transplanted into diabetic rats were monitored by weekly blood glucose measurement. Results. WJ-MSCs showed better proliferation and differentiation potential than pancreatic MSCs and BM-MSCs. In vivo, WJ-IPCs significantly reduced blood glucose levels at first week after transplantation and maintained significant decrease till week 8. BM-IPCs reduced blood glucose levels at first week but gradually increased since week 3. In resected pancreas-IPCs group, blood glucose levels were significantly reduced till two weeks after transplantation and gradually increased since week 4. Conclusion. WJ-MSCs are the most promising stem cell source for β-cell regeneration in diabetes treatment.

Original languageEnglish
Article number306158
JournalStem Cells International
Volume2015
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015

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Wharton Jelly
Mesenchymal Stromal Cells
Bone Marrow
Insulin
Blood Glucose
Transplantation
C-Peptide
Cell- and Tissue-Based Therapy
Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus
Regeneration
Pancreas

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cell Biology
  • Molecular Biology

Cite this

Comparisons of differentiation potential in human mesenchymal stem cells from Wharton's jelly, bone marrow, and pancreatic tissues. / Kao, Shih Yi; Shyu, Jia Fwu; Wang, Hwai Shi; Lin, Chi Hung; Su, Cheng Hsi; Chen, Tien Hua; Weng, Zen Chung; Tsai, Pei Jiun.

In: Stem Cells International, Vol. 2015, 306158, 2015.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kao, Shih Yi ; Shyu, Jia Fwu ; Wang, Hwai Shi ; Lin, Chi Hung ; Su, Cheng Hsi ; Chen, Tien Hua ; Weng, Zen Chung ; Tsai, Pei Jiun. / Comparisons of differentiation potential in human mesenchymal stem cells from Wharton's jelly, bone marrow, and pancreatic tissues. In: Stem Cells International. 2015 ; Vol. 2015.
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AU - Su, Cheng Hsi

AU - Chen, Tien Hua

AU - Weng, Zen Chung

AU - Tsai, Pei Jiun

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N2 - Background. Type 1 diabetes mellitus results from autoimmune destruction of β-cells. Insulin-producing cells (IPCs) differentiated from mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in human tissues decrease blood glucose levels and improve survival in diabetic rats. We compared the differential ability and the curative effect of IPCs from three types of human tissue to determine the ideal source of cell therapy for diabetes. Methods. We induced MSCs from Wharton's jelly (WJ), bone marrow (BM), and surgically resected pancreatic tissue to differentiate into IPCs. The in vitro differential function of these IPCs was compared by insulin-to-DNA ratios and C-peptide levels after glucose challenge. In vivo curative effects of IPCs transplanted into diabetic rats were monitored by weekly blood glucose measurement. Results. WJ-MSCs showed better proliferation and differentiation potential than pancreatic MSCs and BM-MSCs. In vivo, WJ-IPCs significantly reduced blood glucose levels at first week after transplantation and maintained significant decrease till week 8. BM-IPCs reduced blood glucose levels at first week but gradually increased since week 3. In resected pancreas-IPCs group, blood glucose levels were significantly reduced till two weeks after transplantation and gradually increased since week 4. Conclusion. WJ-MSCs are the most promising stem cell source for β-cell regeneration in diabetes treatment.

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