Comparison of the effects of perceived self-efficacy on coping with chronic cancer pain and coping with chronic low back pain

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Abstract

Objective: The purposes of this study were to explore the differences between chronic cancer pain and chronic low back pain with respect to (a) the use of coping strategies to manage pain and (b) the relationship between self-efficacy for attenuating pain and pain outcomes. Design: Descriptive correlational design. Patients: Eighty-five patients experiencing chronic low back pain (n = 85) and 88 patients with chronic cancer pain (n = 88) were recruited for this study. Outcome Measures: Modified Coping Strategies Questionnaire, self-efficacy expectancies, and the Brief Pain Inventory. Results and Conclusions: The major findings of this study were that (a) patients with chronic cancer pain reported significantly lower pain intensity and pain interference than did patients with chronic low back pain; (b) the most frequently used coping strategies were almost the same between the low back pain group and the cancer pain group; (c) for both chronic cancer pain and chronic low back pain groups, patients' perceived self-efficacy was significantly inversely correlated with pain intensity and pain interference with daily life; and (d) patients' use of coping strategies was positively correlated with pain intensity and pain interference with daily life. These findings were discussed in terms of implications for clinical practice and future research.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)303-310
Number of pages8
JournalClinical Journal of Pain
Volume14
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 1998

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Self Efficacy
Low Back Pain
Chronic Pain
Pain
Cancer Pain
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Equipment and Supplies

Keywords

  • Cancer pain
  • Chronic pain
  • Coping
  • Low back pain
  • Self-efficacy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

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abstract = "Objective: The purposes of this study were to explore the differences between chronic cancer pain and chronic low back pain with respect to (a) the use of coping strategies to manage pain and (b) the relationship between self-efficacy for attenuating pain and pain outcomes. Design: Descriptive correlational design. Patients: Eighty-five patients experiencing chronic low back pain (n = 85) and 88 patients with chronic cancer pain (n = 88) were recruited for this study. Outcome Measures: Modified Coping Strategies Questionnaire, self-efficacy expectancies, and the Brief Pain Inventory. Results and Conclusions: The major findings of this study were that (a) patients with chronic cancer pain reported significantly lower pain intensity and pain interference than did patients with chronic low back pain; (b) the most frequently used coping strategies were almost the same between the low back pain group and the cancer pain group; (c) for both chronic cancer pain and chronic low back pain groups, patients' perceived self-efficacy was significantly inversely correlated with pain intensity and pain interference with daily life; and (d) patients' use of coping strategies was positively correlated with pain intensity and pain interference with daily life. These findings were discussed in terms of implications for clinical practice and future research.",
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