Comparison of in vitro activities of tigecycline with other antimicrobial agents against Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, and Moraxella catarrhalis in Taiwan

Yeu Jun Lau, Po Ren Hsueh, Yung Ching Liu, Jainn Ming Shyr, Wen Kuei Huang, Lee Jene Teng, Cheng Yi Liu, Kwen Tay Luh

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We compared the in vitro activities of tigecycline to those of other agents against 300 nonduplicate isolates of Streptococcus pneumoniae (194 isolates), Haemophilus influenzae (60 isolates), and Moraxella catarrhalis (46 isolates) recovered from patients treated in three major hospitals in Taiwan from August through December, 2003. All of these isolates were inhibited at 0.5 mg/L of tigecycline. For S. pneumoniae isolates, 72% were not susceptible to penicillin (69% intermediate and 3% resistant) and 96% were not susceptible to azithromycin. Among the 178 isolates resistant to azithromycin, 53 isolates (30%) had the M phenotype and 70% had the cMLS B phenotype. The rate of nonsusceptibility to ertapenem, telithromycin, moxifloxacin, and quinupristin-dalfopristin in S. pneumoniae was 3%, 2%, 1%, and 57%, respectively. For H. influenzae, 36 (60%) were not susceptible to ampicillin, among which 31 possessed β-lactamase. A high rate (8.3%) of A influenzae isolates with β-lactamase-negative and ampicillin-resistant phenotype was found. All H. influenzae isolates were susceptible to azithromycin, but 40% of them were not susceptible to clarithromycin. Ninety-eight percent (44 isolates) of M. catarhalis possessed β-lactamase. All three fluoroquinolones tested were highly active (MIC 90

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)130-135
Number of pages6
JournalMicrobial Drug Resistance
Volume12
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2006
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Microbiology (medical)
  • Pharmacology
  • Immunology
  • Microbiology

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