Comparison of clinical characteristics and prognosis in Taiwanese patients with coronary vasospastic angina pectoris without significant fixed coronary artery disease versus patients with significant fixed coronary artery disease and either stable angina pectoris or acute coronary syndromes

Ming Jui Hung, Ming-Yow Hung, Chi Wen Cheng, Ning I. Yang, Wen Jin Cherng

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Limited information is available comparing the clinical characteristics and prognosis for patients with coronary vasospastic angina in the absence of hemodynamically significant coronary artery disease (CAD) (defined as >50% stenosis) versus patients with significant fixed CAD presenting with either stable angina pectoris (SAP) or acute coronary syndromes (ACS). METHODS: Patients who underwent cardiac catheterization for suspected ischemic heart disease between August 1999 and February 2003 were followed clinically. For patients without hemodynamically significant CAD, a provocation test for coronary vasospasm was undertaken using a step-wise dose of intracoronary ergonovine administration. RESULTS: A total of 1134 patients were enrolled in the final analysis and stratified into 4 diagnostically distinct groups: control group (n = 239; mild CAD without coronary vasospasm); vasospasm group (n = 284; coronary vasospastic angina pectoris without hemodynamically significant CAD); SAP group (n = 110; hemodynamically significant CAD with SAP); ACS group (n = 501; hemodynamically significant CAD with ACS). Comparison of these 4 groups revealed that the ACS patients were more likely to be male, current smokers, and have hypercholesterolemia. In addition, this group had a significantly higher incidence of typical angina pectoris, 3-vessel CAD, and lower left ventricular ejection fraction. Between-group comparison revealed that vasospasm patients had a significantly higher incidence of early morning angina pectoris. Multivariate analysis showed that current smoking was the most independent risk factor associated with the diagnosis of coronary vasospastic angina pectoris in patients without hemodynamically significant CAD. During a median follow-up period of 49 months, recurrent angina pectoris was noted in patients from the control (n = 6; 3%), SAP (n = 9; 8%), vasospasm (n = 30, 11%), and ACS groups (n = 92; 18%); with nonfatal myocardial infarction identified during follow-up in the SAP (n = 5; 5%), vasospasm (n = 3; 1%), and ACS groups (n = 37; 7%). In addition, 29 and 3 cardiac deaths occurred in the ACS and SAP groups, respectively, whereas there were no such mortalities in the control and vasospasm groups. CONCLUSIONS: Early morning angina pectoris and cigarette smoking were the most common clinical characteristics in patients with coronary vasospasm. These patients had an excellent prognosis despite the possibility of recurrences of vasospastic angina pectoris.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)160-167
Number of pages8
JournalAmerican Journal of the Medical Sciences
Volume334
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 2007
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Stable Angina
Angina Pectoris
Acute Coronary Syndrome
Coronary Artery Disease
Coronary Vasospasm
Smoking
Ergonovine
Control Groups
Incidence
Cardiac Catheterization
Hypercholesterolemia
Stroke Volume
Myocardial Ischemia
Pathologic Constriction
Multivariate Analysis
Myocardial Infarction

Keywords

  • Coronary spasm
  • Prognosis
  • Risk factors

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

@article{47231f21a4a14c168aba1f9dc9c8d6bf,
title = "Comparison of clinical characteristics and prognosis in Taiwanese patients with coronary vasospastic angina pectoris without significant fixed coronary artery disease versus patients with significant fixed coronary artery disease and either stable angina pectoris or acute coronary syndromes",
abstract = "BACKGROUND: Limited information is available comparing the clinical characteristics and prognosis for patients with coronary vasospastic angina in the absence of hemodynamically significant coronary artery disease (CAD) (defined as >50{\%} stenosis) versus patients with significant fixed CAD presenting with either stable angina pectoris (SAP) or acute coronary syndromes (ACS). METHODS: Patients who underwent cardiac catheterization for suspected ischemic heart disease between August 1999 and February 2003 were followed clinically. For patients without hemodynamically significant CAD, a provocation test for coronary vasospasm was undertaken using a step-wise dose of intracoronary ergonovine administration. RESULTS: A total of 1134 patients were enrolled in the final analysis and stratified into 4 diagnostically distinct groups: control group (n = 239; mild CAD without coronary vasospasm); vasospasm group (n = 284; coronary vasospastic angina pectoris without hemodynamically significant CAD); SAP group (n = 110; hemodynamically significant CAD with SAP); ACS group (n = 501; hemodynamically significant CAD with ACS). Comparison of these 4 groups revealed that the ACS patients were more likely to be male, current smokers, and have hypercholesterolemia. In addition, this group had a significantly higher incidence of typical angina pectoris, 3-vessel CAD, and lower left ventricular ejection fraction. Between-group comparison revealed that vasospasm patients had a significantly higher incidence of early morning angina pectoris. Multivariate analysis showed that current smoking was the most independent risk factor associated with the diagnosis of coronary vasospastic angina pectoris in patients without hemodynamically significant CAD. During a median follow-up period of 49 months, recurrent angina pectoris was noted in patients from the control (n = 6; 3{\%}), SAP (n = 9; 8{\%}), vasospasm (n = 30, 11{\%}), and ACS groups (n = 92; 18{\%}); with nonfatal myocardial infarction identified during follow-up in the SAP (n = 5; 5{\%}), vasospasm (n = 3; 1{\%}), and ACS groups (n = 37; 7{\%}). In addition, 29 and 3 cardiac deaths occurred in the ACS and SAP groups, respectively, whereas there were no such mortalities in the control and vasospasm groups. CONCLUSIONS: Early morning angina pectoris and cigarette smoking were the most common clinical characteristics in patients with coronary vasospasm. These patients had an excellent prognosis despite the possibility of recurrences of vasospastic angina pectoris.",
keywords = "Coronary spasm, Prognosis, Risk factors",
author = "Hung, {Ming Jui} and Ming-Yow Hung and Cheng, {Chi Wen} and Yang, {Ning I.} and Cherng, {Wen Jin}",
year = "2007",
month = "9",
doi = "10.1097/MAJ.0b013e3181405b30",
language = "English",
volume = "334",
pages = "160--167",
journal = "American Journal of the Medical Sciences",
issn = "0002-9629",
publisher = "Lippincott Williams and Wilkins",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Comparison of clinical characteristics and prognosis in Taiwanese patients with coronary vasospastic angina pectoris without significant fixed coronary artery disease versus patients with significant fixed coronary artery disease and either stable angina pectoris or acute coronary syndromes

AU - Hung, Ming Jui

AU - Hung, Ming-Yow

AU - Cheng, Chi Wen

AU - Yang, Ning I.

AU - Cherng, Wen Jin

PY - 2007/9

Y1 - 2007/9

N2 - BACKGROUND: Limited information is available comparing the clinical characteristics and prognosis for patients with coronary vasospastic angina in the absence of hemodynamically significant coronary artery disease (CAD) (defined as >50% stenosis) versus patients with significant fixed CAD presenting with either stable angina pectoris (SAP) or acute coronary syndromes (ACS). METHODS: Patients who underwent cardiac catheterization for suspected ischemic heart disease between August 1999 and February 2003 were followed clinically. For patients without hemodynamically significant CAD, a provocation test for coronary vasospasm was undertaken using a step-wise dose of intracoronary ergonovine administration. RESULTS: A total of 1134 patients were enrolled in the final analysis and stratified into 4 diagnostically distinct groups: control group (n = 239; mild CAD without coronary vasospasm); vasospasm group (n = 284; coronary vasospastic angina pectoris without hemodynamically significant CAD); SAP group (n = 110; hemodynamically significant CAD with SAP); ACS group (n = 501; hemodynamically significant CAD with ACS). Comparison of these 4 groups revealed that the ACS patients were more likely to be male, current smokers, and have hypercholesterolemia. In addition, this group had a significantly higher incidence of typical angina pectoris, 3-vessel CAD, and lower left ventricular ejection fraction. Between-group comparison revealed that vasospasm patients had a significantly higher incidence of early morning angina pectoris. Multivariate analysis showed that current smoking was the most independent risk factor associated with the diagnosis of coronary vasospastic angina pectoris in patients without hemodynamically significant CAD. During a median follow-up period of 49 months, recurrent angina pectoris was noted in patients from the control (n = 6; 3%), SAP (n = 9; 8%), vasospasm (n = 30, 11%), and ACS groups (n = 92; 18%); with nonfatal myocardial infarction identified during follow-up in the SAP (n = 5; 5%), vasospasm (n = 3; 1%), and ACS groups (n = 37; 7%). In addition, 29 and 3 cardiac deaths occurred in the ACS and SAP groups, respectively, whereas there were no such mortalities in the control and vasospasm groups. CONCLUSIONS: Early morning angina pectoris and cigarette smoking were the most common clinical characteristics in patients with coronary vasospasm. These patients had an excellent prognosis despite the possibility of recurrences of vasospastic angina pectoris.

AB - BACKGROUND: Limited information is available comparing the clinical characteristics and prognosis for patients with coronary vasospastic angina in the absence of hemodynamically significant coronary artery disease (CAD) (defined as >50% stenosis) versus patients with significant fixed CAD presenting with either stable angina pectoris (SAP) or acute coronary syndromes (ACS). METHODS: Patients who underwent cardiac catheterization for suspected ischemic heart disease between August 1999 and February 2003 were followed clinically. For patients without hemodynamically significant CAD, a provocation test for coronary vasospasm was undertaken using a step-wise dose of intracoronary ergonovine administration. RESULTS: A total of 1134 patients were enrolled in the final analysis and stratified into 4 diagnostically distinct groups: control group (n = 239; mild CAD without coronary vasospasm); vasospasm group (n = 284; coronary vasospastic angina pectoris without hemodynamically significant CAD); SAP group (n = 110; hemodynamically significant CAD with SAP); ACS group (n = 501; hemodynamically significant CAD with ACS). Comparison of these 4 groups revealed that the ACS patients were more likely to be male, current smokers, and have hypercholesterolemia. In addition, this group had a significantly higher incidence of typical angina pectoris, 3-vessel CAD, and lower left ventricular ejection fraction. Between-group comparison revealed that vasospasm patients had a significantly higher incidence of early morning angina pectoris. Multivariate analysis showed that current smoking was the most independent risk factor associated with the diagnosis of coronary vasospastic angina pectoris in patients without hemodynamically significant CAD. During a median follow-up period of 49 months, recurrent angina pectoris was noted in patients from the control (n = 6; 3%), SAP (n = 9; 8%), vasospasm (n = 30, 11%), and ACS groups (n = 92; 18%); with nonfatal myocardial infarction identified during follow-up in the SAP (n = 5; 5%), vasospasm (n = 3; 1%), and ACS groups (n = 37; 7%). In addition, 29 and 3 cardiac deaths occurred in the ACS and SAP groups, respectively, whereas there were no such mortalities in the control and vasospasm groups. CONCLUSIONS: Early morning angina pectoris and cigarette smoking were the most common clinical characteristics in patients with coronary vasospasm. These patients had an excellent prognosis despite the possibility of recurrences of vasospastic angina pectoris.

KW - Coronary spasm

KW - Prognosis

KW - Risk factors

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=34548664369&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=34548664369&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1097/MAJ.0b013e3181405b30

DO - 10.1097/MAJ.0b013e3181405b30

M3 - Article

C2 - 17873528

AN - SCOPUS:34548664369

VL - 334

SP - 160

EP - 167

JO - American Journal of the Medical Sciences

JF - American Journal of the Medical Sciences

SN - 0002-9629

IS - 3

ER -