Comparative performance of species richness estimation methods

B. A. Walther, S. Morand

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

222 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In most real-world contexts the sampling effort needed to attain an accurate estimate of total species richness is excessive. Therefore, methods to estimate total species richness from incomplete collections need to be developed and tested. Using real and computer-simulated parasite data sets, the performances of 9 species richness estimation methods were compared. For all data sets, each estimation method was used to calculate the projected species richness at increasing levels of sampling effort. The performance of each method was evaluated by calculating the bias and precision of its estimates against the known total species richness. Performance was evaluated with increasing sampling effort and across different model communities. For the real data sets, the Chao2 and first-order jackknife estimators performed best. For the simulated data sets, the first-order jackknife estimator performed best at low sampling effort but, with increasing sampling effort, the bootstrap estimator outperformed all other estimators. Estimator performance increased with increasing species richness, aggregation level of individuals among samples and overall population size. Overall, the Chao2 and the first-order jackknife estimation methods performed best and should be used to control for the confounding effects of sampling effort in studies of parasite species richness. Potential uses of and practical problems with species richness estimation methods are discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)395-405
Number of pages11
JournalParasitology
Volume116
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1998
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

species diversity
sampling
Parasites
methodology
Population Density
parasites
population size
Datasets

Keywords

  • Bootstrap
  • Diversity
  • Estimation methods
  • Jackknife
  • Sampling methods
  • Species accumulation curves
  • Species richness

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Parasitology
  • Immunology

Cite this

Comparative performance of species richness estimation methods. / Walther, B. A.; Morand, S.

In: Parasitology, Vol. 116, No. 4, 1998, p. 395-405.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Walther, B. A. ; Morand, S. / Comparative performance of species richness estimation methods. In: Parasitology. 1998 ; Vol. 116, No. 4. pp. 395-405.
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