Comorbidity profiles among patients with recurrent aphthous stomatitis

A case–control study

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Abstract

Background/purpose: Recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS) is common and associated with certain comorbidities. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of selected comorbidities in patients with RAUs and to compare the risks of comorbidity between the two cohorts of patients with or without RAUs based on the Taiwanese National Health Insurance Research Database. Methods: This case–control study included patients with recurrent aphthous stomatitis (the RAS cohort) and patients without recurrent aphthous stomatitis using 1:1 matching for year of index date, age, sex, monthly income, geographical location, and urbanization level (the non-RAS cohort). We calculated the prevalence of 31 medical comorbidities based on a modified version of the Elixhauser comorbidity index within 1 year before and after the index date. Conditional logistic regression was conducted to compare the risks of each comorbidity between the two cohorts. Results: Compared with the non-RAS cohort, the RAS cohort had a significantly higher prevalence of 16 comorbidities, with 2% or higher prevalence difference for hyperlipidemia (2.9%), headaches (6.9%), liver diseases (2.8%), and peptic ulcers (5.4%). The adjusted odds ratios were >1.5 for headaches (1.92), migraines (1.62), hypothyroidism (1.50), rheumatoid arthritis (1.92), ankylosing spondylitis (1.94), systemic lupus erythematosus (1.82), liver diseases (1.51), peptic ulcers (1.69), hepatitis (1.62), depression (1.76), and psychoses (1.50). Conclusion: Patients with recurrent aphthous stomatitis were associated with increased risk of specific comorbidities. Physicians should screen for these comorbidities for early detection and treatment.

Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of the Formosan Medical Association
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 1 2019

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Comorbidity
Aphthous Stomatitis
Peptic Ulcer
Liver Diseases
Sutton disease 2
Urbanization
Ankylosing Spondylitis
National Health Programs
Hypothyroidism
Hyperlipidemias
Migraine Disorders
Systemic Lupus Erythematosus
Psychotic Disorders
Hepatitis
Headache
Rheumatoid Arthritis
Logistic Models
Odds Ratio
Databases
Depression

Keywords

  • Case–control cohort
  • Comorbidities
  • Prevalence
  • Recurrent aphthous stomatitis
  • Risk

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

@article{7c4ddb82d7b94a83a6b4006edbdfa6d5,
title = "Comorbidity profiles among patients with recurrent aphthous stomatitis: A case–control study",
abstract = "Background/purpose: Recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS) is common and associated with certain comorbidities. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of selected comorbidities in patients with RAUs and to compare the risks of comorbidity between the two cohorts of patients with or without RAUs based on the Taiwanese National Health Insurance Research Database. Methods: This case–control study included patients with recurrent aphthous stomatitis (the RAS cohort) and patients without recurrent aphthous stomatitis using 1:1 matching for year of index date, age, sex, monthly income, geographical location, and urbanization level (the non-RAS cohort). We calculated the prevalence of 31 medical comorbidities based on a modified version of the Elixhauser comorbidity index within 1 year before and after the index date. Conditional logistic regression was conducted to compare the risks of each comorbidity between the two cohorts. Results: Compared with the non-RAS cohort, the RAS cohort had a significantly higher prevalence of 16 comorbidities, with 2{\%} or higher prevalence difference for hyperlipidemia (2.9{\%}), headaches (6.9{\%}), liver diseases (2.8{\%}), and peptic ulcers (5.4{\%}). The adjusted odds ratios were >1.5 for headaches (1.92), migraines (1.62), hypothyroidism (1.50), rheumatoid arthritis (1.92), ankylosing spondylitis (1.94), systemic lupus erythematosus (1.82), liver diseases (1.51), peptic ulcers (1.69), hepatitis (1.62), depression (1.76), and psychoses (1.50). Conclusion: Patients with recurrent aphthous stomatitis were associated with increased risk of specific comorbidities. Physicians should screen for these comorbidities for early detection and treatment.",
keywords = "Case–control cohort, Comorbidities, Prevalence, Recurrent aphthous stomatitis, Risk",
author = "Lin, {Kuan Chou} and Tsai, {Lo Lin} and KO, {Edward Chengchuan} and {Sheng-Po Yuan}, Kevin and Wu, {Szu Yuan}",
year = "2019",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.jfma.2018.10.002",
language = "English",
journal = "Journal of the Formosan Medical Association",
issn = "0929-6646",
publisher = "Elsevier Science Publishers B.V.",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Comorbidity profiles among patients with recurrent aphthous stomatitis

T2 - A case–control study

AU - Lin, Kuan Chou

AU - Tsai, Lo Lin

AU - KO, Edward Chengchuan

AU - Sheng-Po Yuan, Kevin

AU - Wu, Szu Yuan

PY - 2019/1/1

Y1 - 2019/1/1

N2 - Background/purpose: Recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS) is common and associated with certain comorbidities. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of selected comorbidities in patients with RAUs and to compare the risks of comorbidity between the two cohorts of patients with or without RAUs based on the Taiwanese National Health Insurance Research Database. Methods: This case–control study included patients with recurrent aphthous stomatitis (the RAS cohort) and patients without recurrent aphthous stomatitis using 1:1 matching for year of index date, age, sex, monthly income, geographical location, and urbanization level (the non-RAS cohort). We calculated the prevalence of 31 medical comorbidities based on a modified version of the Elixhauser comorbidity index within 1 year before and after the index date. Conditional logistic regression was conducted to compare the risks of each comorbidity between the two cohorts. Results: Compared with the non-RAS cohort, the RAS cohort had a significantly higher prevalence of 16 comorbidities, with 2% or higher prevalence difference for hyperlipidemia (2.9%), headaches (6.9%), liver diseases (2.8%), and peptic ulcers (5.4%). The adjusted odds ratios were >1.5 for headaches (1.92), migraines (1.62), hypothyroidism (1.50), rheumatoid arthritis (1.92), ankylosing spondylitis (1.94), systemic lupus erythematosus (1.82), liver diseases (1.51), peptic ulcers (1.69), hepatitis (1.62), depression (1.76), and psychoses (1.50). Conclusion: Patients with recurrent aphthous stomatitis were associated with increased risk of specific comorbidities. Physicians should screen for these comorbidities for early detection and treatment.

AB - Background/purpose: Recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS) is common and associated with certain comorbidities. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of selected comorbidities in patients with RAUs and to compare the risks of comorbidity between the two cohorts of patients with or without RAUs based on the Taiwanese National Health Insurance Research Database. Methods: This case–control study included patients with recurrent aphthous stomatitis (the RAS cohort) and patients without recurrent aphthous stomatitis using 1:1 matching for year of index date, age, sex, monthly income, geographical location, and urbanization level (the non-RAS cohort). We calculated the prevalence of 31 medical comorbidities based on a modified version of the Elixhauser comorbidity index within 1 year before and after the index date. Conditional logistic regression was conducted to compare the risks of each comorbidity between the two cohorts. Results: Compared with the non-RAS cohort, the RAS cohort had a significantly higher prevalence of 16 comorbidities, with 2% or higher prevalence difference for hyperlipidemia (2.9%), headaches (6.9%), liver diseases (2.8%), and peptic ulcers (5.4%). The adjusted odds ratios were >1.5 for headaches (1.92), migraines (1.62), hypothyroidism (1.50), rheumatoid arthritis (1.92), ankylosing spondylitis (1.94), systemic lupus erythematosus (1.82), liver diseases (1.51), peptic ulcers (1.69), hepatitis (1.62), depression (1.76), and psychoses (1.50). Conclusion: Patients with recurrent aphthous stomatitis were associated with increased risk of specific comorbidities. Physicians should screen for these comorbidities for early detection and treatment.

KW - Case–control cohort

KW - Comorbidities

KW - Prevalence

KW - Recurrent aphthous stomatitis

KW - Risk

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U2 - 10.1016/j.jfma.2018.10.002

DO - 10.1016/j.jfma.2018.10.002

M3 - Article

JO - Journal of the Formosan Medical Association

JF - Journal of the Formosan Medical Association

SN - 0929-6646

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