Combined Low Plant and High Animal Dietary Pattern Is Associated with a Lower Risk of Anemia among Dyslipidemic Adult Women in Taiwan: A Retrospective Study from 2001 to 2015

Sintha Dewi Purnamasari, Chien Yeh Hsu, Yi Tien Chen, Adi Lukas Kurniawan, Hsiu An Lee, Jane C.J. Chao

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Anemia and dyslipidemia often occurs in premenopausal women. This study investigated the association between dietary patterns and anemia among dyslipidemic women in Taiwan. This study recruited 22,631 dyslipidemic women aged 20–45 years between 2001 and 2015. The dietary assessment was collected by a validated food frequency questionnaire. The biochemical data including blood lipids, red blood cells, hemoglobin, hematocrit, and C-reactive protein (CRP) were retrieved from the database. Women with a combined high plant diet (HP) and low animal diet (LA) were associated with a lower prevalence of obesity (11.7%), central obesity (16.0%), high total cholesterol (16.4%), and high low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (11.9%), and had lower hemoglobin (12.9 ± 1.4 g/dL), hematocrit (38.8 ± 3.6%), and CRP levels (20.6 ± 31.4 nmol/L). The low plant diet (LP) + high animal diet (HA) pattern was negatively associated with moderate to severe anemia (OR: 0.76, 95% CI: 0.64–0.92, p = 0.004) compared to the low plant diet (LP) + low animal diet (LA) pattern. However, the HP + LA pattern was positively correlated with moderate to severe anemia (OR: 1.22, 95% CI: 1.04–1.43, p = 0.015). In conclusion, a low plant and high animal diet plays a role in preventing anemia development among dyslipidemic women.

Original languageEnglish
Article number6231
JournalInternational journal of environmental research and public health
Volume19
Issue number10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 2022

Keywords

  • anemia
  • animal diet
  • dyslipidemia
  • plant diet

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pollution
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Health, Toxicology and Mutagenesis

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