Coexisting cytomegalovirus infection in immunocompetent patients with Clostridium difficile colitis

Khee Siang Chan, Wen Ying Lee, Wen Liang Yu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Cytomegalovirus (CMV) colitis usually occurs in immunocompromised patients with human immunodeficiency virus infection, organ transplantation, and malignancy receiving chemotherapy or ulcerative colitis receiving immunosuppressive agents. However, CMV colitis is increasingly recognized in immunocompetent hosts. Notably, CMV colitis coexisting with Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) in apparently healthy individuals has been published in recent years, which could result in high morbidity and mortality. CMV colitis is a rare but possible differential diagnosis in immunocompetent patients with abdominal pain, watery, or especially bloody diarrhea, which could be refractory to standard treatment for CDI. As a characteristic of CDI, however, pseudomembranous colitis may be only caused by CMV infection. Real-time CMV-polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for blood and stool samples may be a useful and noninvasive diagnostic strategy to identify CMV infection when treatment of CDI eventually fails to show significant benefits. Quantitative CMV-PCR in mucosal biopsies may increase the diagnostic yield of traditional histopathology. CMV colitis is potentially life-threatening if severe complications occur, such as sepsis secondary to colitis, massive colorectal bleeding, toxic megacolon, and colonic perforation, so that may necessitate pre-emptive antiviral treatment for those who are positive for CMV-PCR in blood and/or stool samples while pending histological diagnosis.

Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Microbiology, Immunology and Infection
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - Jun 30 2015

Fingerprint

Clostridium difficile
Cytomegalovirus Infections
Colitis
Cytomegalovirus
Clostridium Infections
Toxic Megacolon
Pseudomembranous Enterocolitis
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Immunocompromised Host
Organ Transplantation
Virus Diseases
Immunosuppressive Agents
Ulcerative Colitis
Abdominal Pain
Antiviral Agents
Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction
Diarrhea
Sepsis
Differential Diagnosis
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • C. difficile infection
  • Clostridium difficile
  • Colitis
  • Cytomegalovirus
  • Immunocompetent

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Microbiology (medical)
  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Immunology and Microbiology(all)
  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

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title = "Coexisting cytomegalovirus infection in immunocompetent patients with Clostridium difficile colitis",
abstract = "Cytomegalovirus (CMV) colitis usually occurs in immunocompromised patients with human immunodeficiency virus infection, organ transplantation, and malignancy receiving chemotherapy or ulcerative colitis receiving immunosuppressive agents. However, CMV colitis is increasingly recognized in immunocompetent hosts. Notably, CMV colitis coexisting with Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) in apparently healthy individuals has been published in recent years, which could result in high morbidity and mortality. CMV colitis is a rare but possible differential diagnosis in immunocompetent patients with abdominal pain, watery, or especially bloody diarrhea, which could be refractory to standard treatment for CDI. As a characteristic of CDI, however, pseudomembranous colitis may be only caused by CMV infection. Real-time CMV-polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for blood and stool samples may be a useful and noninvasive diagnostic strategy to identify CMV infection when treatment of CDI eventually fails to show significant benefits. Quantitative CMV-PCR in mucosal biopsies may increase the diagnostic yield of traditional histopathology. CMV colitis is potentially life-threatening if severe complications occur, such as sepsis secondary to colitis, massive colorectal bleeding, toxic megacolon, and colonic perforation, so that may necessitate pre-emptive antiviral treatment for those who are positive for CMV-PCR in blood and/or stool samples while pending histological diagnosis.",
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AU - Lee, Wen Ying

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N2 - Cytomegalovirus (CMV) colitis usually occurs in immunocompromised patients with human immunodeficiency virus infection, organ transplantation, and malignancy receiving chemotherapy or ulcerative colitis receiving immunosuppressive agents. However, CMV colitis is increasingly recognized in immunocompetent hosts. Notably, CMV colitis coexisting with Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) in apparently healthy individuals has been published in recent years, which could result in high morbidity and mortality. CMV colitis is a rare but possible differential diagnosis in immunocompetent patients with abdominal pain, watery, or especially bloody diarrhea, which could be refractory to standard treatment for CDI. As a characteristic of CDI, however, pseudomembranous colitis may be only caused by CMV infection. Real-time CMV-polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for blood and stool samples may be a useful and noninvasive diagnostic strategy to identify CMV infection when treatment of CDI eventually fails to show significant benefits. Quantitative CMV-PCR in mucosal biopsies may increase the diagnostic yield of traditional histopathology. CMV colitis is potentially life-threatening if severe complications occur, such as sepsis secondary to colitis, massive colorectal bleeding, toxic megacolon, and colonic perforation, so that may necessitate pre-emptive antiviral treatment for those who are positive for CMV-PCR in blood and/or stool samples while pending histological diagnosis.

AB - Cytomegalovirus (CMV) colitis usually occurs in immunocompromised patients with human immunodeficiency virus infection, organ transplantation, and malignancy receiving chemotherapy or ulcerative colitis receiving immunosuppressive agents. However, CMV colitis is increasingly recognized in immunocompetent hosts. Notably, CMV colitis coexisting with Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) in apparently healthy individuals has been published in recent years, which could result in high morbidity and mortality. CMV colitis is a rare but possible differential diagnosis in immunocompetent patients with abdominal pain, watery, or especially bloody diarrhea, which could be refractory to standard treatment for CDI. As a characteristic of CDI, however, pseudomembranous colitis may be only caused by CMV infection. Real-time CMV-polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for blood and stool samples may be a useful and noninvasive diagnostic strategy to identify CMV infection when treatment of CDI eventually fails to show significant benefits. Quantitative CMV-PCR in mucosal biopsies may increase the diagnostic yield of traditional histopathology. CMV colitis is potentially life-threatening if severe complications occur, such as sepsis secondary to colitis, massive colorectal bleeding, toxic megacolon, and colonic perforation, so that may necessitate pre-emptive antiviral treatment for those who are positive for CMV-PCR in blood and/or stool samples while pending histological diagnosis.

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