Clinical features of echovirus 6 and 9 infections in children

Hao Yuan Lee, Chih Jung Chen, Yhu Chering Huang, Wen Chen Li, Cheng Hsun Chiu, Chung Guei Huang, Kuo Chien Tsao, Chang Teng Wu, Tzou Yien Lin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Clinical features of echovirus 6 and 9 infections in children have not been comprehensively evaluated, particularly for sporadic cases. Objective: To describe the clinical features of children with echovirus 6 or 9 infections. Study designs: From 2000 to 2008, 199 children with culture-proven echovirus 6 or 9 infections identified in a university-affiliated hospital were included. Data extracted from 174 inpatients were further analyzed. Results: Age ranged from 4 days to 15 years with a mean of 4.7 years. 123 (62%) were male. The disease spectrums were similar for echovirus 6 (n=100) and 9 (n=74) infections, with aseptic meningitis (49% and 51%, respectively) being the most common syndrome, followed by meningismus, upper respiratory tract infection, pneumonia, and herpangina. All 174 inpatients had fever but the duration of fever was significantly longer in patient with echovirus 9 infection than those with echovirus 6 infections (6.0 days vs. 3.8 days, p<0.001). The rate of leukocytosis (leukocyte count. >15,000/μL) were significantly higher in patients with echovirus 6 infections than those with echovirus 9 infection (p<0.001). One neonate with echovirus 6 infection died from hepatic necrosis with coagulopathy, and one infant with echovirus 6 infection and one child with echovirus 9 infection died from brain involvement. Two children had long-term sequelae of seizure disorder. The remaining 169 children (97%) recovered uneventfully. Conclusion: For children with echovirus 6 or 9 infections requiring hospitalization, aseptic meningitis was the most common manifestation and fatal outcome or long-term sequel, though rare, might occur.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)175-179
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Clinical Virology
Volume49
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 2010
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Human echovirus 6
Echovirus 9
Echovirus Infections
Infection
Aseptic Meningitis
Herpangina
Inpatients
Fever
Meningism
Fatal Outcome
Respiratory Tract Infections
Epilepsy
Pneumonia
Hospitalization
Necrosis

Keywords

  • Aseptic meningitis
  • Children
  • Echovirus 6
  • Echovirus 9

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Infectious Diseases
  • Virology

Cite this

Lee, H. Y., Chen, C. J., Huang, Y. C., Li, W. C., Chiu, C. H., Huang, C. G., ... Lin, T. Y. (2010). Clinical features of echovirus 6 and 9 infections in children. Journal of Clinical Virology, 49(3), 175-179. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jcv.2010.07.010

Clinical features of echovirus 6 and 9 infections in children. / Lee, Hao Yuan; Chen, Chih Jung; Huang, Yhu Chering; Li, Wen Chen; Chiu, Cheng Hsun; Huang, Chung Guei; Tsao, Kuo Chien; Wu, Chang Teng; Lin, Tzou Yien.

In: Journal of Clinical Virology, Vol. 49, No. 3, 11.2010, p. 175-179.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lee, HY, Chen, CJ, Huang, YC, Li, WC, Chiu, CH, Huang, CG, Tsao, KC, Wu, CT & Lin, TY 2010, 'Clinical features of echovirus 6 and 9 infections in children', Journal of Clinical Virology, vol. 49, no. 3, pp. 175-179. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jcv.2010.07.010
Lee HY, Chen CJ, Huang YC, Li WC, Chiu CH, Huang CG et al. Clinical features of echovirus 6 and 9 infections in children. Journal of Clinical Virology. 2010 Nov;49(3):175-179. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jcv.2010.07.010
Lee, Hao Yuan ; Chen, Chih Jung ; Huang, Yhu Chering ; Li, Wen Chen ; Chiu, Cheng Hsun ; Huang, Chung Guei ; Tsao, Kuo Chien ; Wu, Chang Teng ; Lin, Tzou Yien. / Clinical features of echovirus 6 and 9 infections in children. In: Journal of Clinical Virology. 2010 ; Vol. 49, No. 3. pp. 175-179.
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