Clinical and pathophysiological correlates of the symptom severity of stress urinary incontinence

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Abstract

Introduction and hypothesis: The pathophysiology of stress urinary incontinence (SUI) is multifactorial. The aim of this study was to explore the factor determining the symptom severity of SUI. Methods: One hundred twenty-four women with SUI were retrospectively investigated. Clinical data for analyses included demographics, pelvic organ prolapse quantification, SUI severity using a 4-point Likert scale, ultrasound, 1-h pad tests, and urodynamic studies. Data were analyzed using the Spearman's rho test and Kruskal-Wallis test. Results: The symptom severity was not correlated with risk factors of SUI or the morphologic manifestations representing urethral support defect, but was significantly correlated with urine loss on 1-h pad test, Valsalva leak point pressure (VLPP) grading, and maximum urethral closure pressure (MUCP). Women with higher SUI severity had greater urine loss on 1-h pad tests, worse VLPP grading, and lower MUCP. Conclusions: Urethral sphincter function appears to be an important determinant for the symptom severity of SUI.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)637-643
Number of pages7
JournalInternational Urogynecology Journal and Pelvic Floor Dysfunction
Volume21
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2010

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Stress Urinary Incontinence
Pressure
Urine
Pelvic Organ Prolapse
Urodynamics
Urethra
Demography

Keywords

  • Stress urinary incontinence
  • Symptom severity
  • Urethral sphincter function
  • Urethral support
  • Urodynamic stress incontinence

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Urology
  • Obstetrics and Gynaecology

Cite this

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title = "Clinical and pathophysiological correlates of the symptom severity of stress urinary incontinence",
abstract = "Introduction and hypothesis: The pathophysiology of stress urinary incontinence (SUI) is multifactorial. The aim of this study was to explore the factor determining the symptom severity of SUI. Methods: One hundred twenty-four women with SUI were retrospectively investigated. Clinical data for analyses included demographics, pelvic organ prolapse quantification, SUI severity using a 4-point Likert scale, ultrasound, 1-h pad tests, and urodynamic studies. Data were analyzed using the Spearman's rho test and Kruskal-Wallis test. Results: The symptom severity was not correlated with risk factors of SUI or the morphologic manifestations representing urethral support defect, but was significantly correlated with urine loss on 1-h pad test, Valsalva leak point pressure (VLPP) grading, and maximum urethral closure pressure (MUCP). Women with higher SUI severity had greater urine loss on 1-h pad tests, worse VLPP grading, and lower MUCP. Conclusions: Urethral sphincter function appears to be an important determinant for the symptom severity of SUI.",
keywords = "Stress urinary incontinence, Symptom severity, Urethral sphincter function, Urethral support, Urodynamic stress incontinence",
author = "Yang, {Jenn Ming} and Yang, {Shwu Huey} and Yang, {Shu Yu} and Evelyn Yang and Huang, {Wen Chen} and Tzeng, {Chii Ruey}",
year = "2010",
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AU - Yang, Jenn Ming

AU - Yang, Shwu Huey

AU - Yang, Shu Yu

AU - Yang, Evelyn

AU - Huang, Wen Chen

AU - Tzeng, Chii Ruey

PY - 2010/6

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N2 - Introduction and hypothesis: The pathophysiology of stress urinary incontinence (SUI) is multifactorial. The aim of this study was to explore the factor determining the symptom severity of SUI. Methods: One hundred twenty-four women with SUI were retrospectively investigated. Clinical data for analyses included demographics, pelvic organ prolapse quantification, SUI severity using a 4-point Likert scale, ultrasound, 1-h pad tests, and urodynamic studies. Data were analyzed using the Spearman's rho test and Kruskal-Wallis test. Results: The symptom severity was not correlated with risk factors of SUI or the morphologic manifestations representing urethral support defect, but was significantly correlated with urine loss on 1-h pad test, Valsalva leak point pressure (VLPP) grading, and maximum urethral closure pressure (MUCP). Women with higher SUI severity had greater urine loss on 1-h pad tests, worse VLPP grading, and lower MUCP. Conclusions: Urethral sphincter function appears to be an important determinant for the symptom severity of SUI.

AB - Introduction and hypothesis: The pathophysiology of stress urinary incontinence (SUI) is multifactorial. The aim of this study was to explore the factor determining the symptom severity of SUI. Methods: One hundred twenty-four women with SUI were retrospectively investigated. Clinical data for analyses included demographics, pelvic organ prolapse quantification, SUI severity using a 4-point Likert scale, ultrasound, 1-h pad tests, and urodynamic studies. Data were analyzed using the Spearman's rho test and Kruskal-Wallis test. Results: The symptom severity was not correlated with risk factors of SUI or the morphologic manifestations representing urethral support defect, but was significantly correlated with urine loss on 1-h pad test, Valsalva leak point pressure (VLPP) grading, and maximum urethral closure pressure (MUCP). Women with higher SUI severity had greater urine loss on 1-h pad tests, worse VLPP grading, and lower MUCP. Conclusions: Urethral sphincter function appears to be an important determinant for the symptom severity of SUI.

KW - Stress urinary incontinence

KW - Symptom severity

KW - Urethral sphincter function

KW - Urethral support

KW - Urodynamic stress incontinence

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