Clinical and pathological features of fat embolism with acute respiratory distress syndrome

Shang Jyh Kao, Diana Yu Wung Yeh, Hsing I. Chen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

38 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

FES (fat embolism syndrome) is a clinical problem, and, although ARDS (acute respiratory distress syndrome) has been considered as a serious complication of FES, the pathogenesis of ARDS associated with FES remains unclear. In the present study, we investigated the clinical manifestations, and biochemical and pathophysiological changes, in subjects associated with FES and ARDS, to elucidate the possible mechanisms involved in this disorder. A total of eight patients with FES were studied, and arterial blood pH, PaO2 (arterial partial pressure of O2), PaCO2 (arterial partial pressure of CO2), biochemical and pathophysiological data were obtained. These subjects suffered from crash injuries and developed FES associated with ARDS, and each died within 2 h after admission. In the subjects, chest radiography revealed that the lungs were clear on admission, and pulmonary infiltration was observed within 2 h of admission. Arterial blood pH and PaO2 declined, whereas PaCO2 increased. Plasma PLA2 (phospholipase A2), nitrate/nitrite, methylguanidine, TNF-α (tumour necrosis factor-α), IL-Iβ (interleukin-Iβ) and IL-10 (interleukin-10) were significantly elevated. Pathological examinations revealed alveolar oedema and haemorrhage with multiple fat droplet depositions and fibrin thrombi. Fat droplets were also found in the arterioles and/or capillaries in the lung, kidney and brain. Immunohistochemical staining identified iNOS (inducible nitric oxide synthase) in alveolar macrophages. In conclusion, our clinical analysis suggests that PLA2. NO, free radicals and pro-inflammatory cytokines are involved in the pathogenesis of ARDS associated with FES. The major source of NO is the alveolar macrophages.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)279-285
Number of pages7
JournalClinical Science
Volume113
Issue number5-6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 2007

Fingerprint

Fat Embolism
Adult Respiratory Distress Syndrome
Partial Pressure
Arterial Pressure
Phospholipases A2
Alveolar Macrophages
Interleukin-1
Lung
Methylguanidine
Fats
Arterioles
Nitric Oxide Synthase Type II
Nitrites
Fibrin
Radiography
Interleukin-10
Nitrates
Free Radicals
Edema
Thrombosis

Keywords

  • Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS)
  • Alveolar macrophage
  • Fat embolism syndrome
  • Inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS)
  • Pro-inflammatory cytokine

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Clinical and pathological features of fat embolism with acute respiratory distress syndrome. / Kao, Shang Jyh; Yeh, Diana Yu Wung; Chen, Hsing I.

In: Clinical Science, Vol. 113, No. 5-6, 09.2007, p. 279-285.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kao, Shang Jyh ; Yeh, Diana Yu Wung ; Chen, Hsing I. / Clinical and pathological features of fat embolism with acute respiratory distress syndrome. In: Clinical Science. 2007 ; Vol. 113, No. 5-6. pp. 279-285.
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