Chromosomal Abnormalities and their Clinical Significance in Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

J. D. Rowley, A. I. Goldman, S. D. Lawler, L. M.Seeker Walker, F. Mitelman, G. Alimena, R. Berger, G. H. Borqström, L. Brandt, D. Catovsky, A. de la Chapelle, G. W. Dewald, O. M. Garson, S. Garwicz, H. M. Golomb, D. K. Hossfeld, P. Nilsson, R. J. Pierre, P. Philip, E. Prigogina & 8 others M. Sakurai, A. A. Sandberg, G. Tricot, H. Van Den Berghe, A. V. Van Orshoven, P. Vuopio, J. Whang-Peng, C. D. Bloomfield

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Abstract

Three hundred thirty newly diagnosed patients were studied to determine the frequency and type of chromosomal abnormalities in acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and their clinical significance. Analyses of banded chromosomes revealed clonal chromosomal abnormalities in 218 patients (66%), including all cases of B-ALL; and 70% of non-T, non-B ALL; but only 39% of T-ALL (p < 0.001). Patients were classified into 10 groups according to karyotype: no abnormalities (34%), one of the following recurring structural abnormalities [the Philadelphia chromosome (12%), t(4;11) (5%), t(8;14) (5%), 14q+ (4.5%), 6q— (4%)] or, in the remaining cases with abnormalities, the modal number [<46 (5%), 46 (12%), 47 to 50 (8%), >50 (9%)]. Response to treatment (achievement of complete remission and remission duration) and survival differed significantly among chromosome groups (p < 0.002). The best responses were seen in patients with a modal number >50; the poorest responses were found in patients with the t(4; 11) and t(8;14). Interestingly, survival for children and adults who had karyotypes with the same specific structural abnormalities [e.g., the Philadelphia chromosome or t(4; 11)] was identical. Multivariate analysis demonstrated that the karyotypic pattern was an independent prognostic factor even when age, initial leukocyte count, and French-American-British (FAB) type were considered. We conclude that banded chromosome studies should be performed in all patients with ALL at diagnosis to identify those patients who have a pattern associated with a poor prognosis who may require more aggressive therapeutic approaches such as marrow transplantation.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)868-873
Number of pages6
JournalCancer Research
Volume43
Issue number2
Publication statusPublished - Feb 1 1983
Externally publishedYes

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Precursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma
Chromosome Aberrations
Chromosomes
Philadelphia Chromosome
Survival
Karyotype
Leukocyte Count
Multivariate Analysis
Transplantation
Bone Marrow
Therapeutics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

Cite this

Rowley, J. D., Goldman, A. I., Lawler, S. D., Walker, L. M. S., Mitelman, F., Alimena, G., ... Bloomfield, C. D. (1983). Chromosomal Abnormalities and their Clinical Significance in Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia. Cancer Research, 43(2), 868-873.

Chromosomal Abnormalities and their Clinical Significance in Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia. / Rowley, J. D.; Goldman, A. I.; Lawler, S. D.; Walker, L. M.Seeker; Mitelman, F.; Alimena, G.; Berger, R.; Borqström, G. H.; Brandt, L.; Catovsky, D.; de la Chapelle, A.; Dewald, G. W.; Garson, O. M.; Garwicz, S.; Golomb, H. M.; Hossfeld, D. K.; Nilsson, P.; Pierre, R. J.; Philip, P.; Prigogina, E.; Sakurai, M.; Sandberg, A. A.; Tricot, G.; Van Den Berghe, H.; Van Orshoven, A. V.; Vuopio, P.; Whang-Peng, J.; Bloomfield, C. D.

In: Cancer Research, Vol. 43, No. 2, 01.02.1983, p. 868-873.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Rowley, JD, Goldman, AI, Lawler, SD, Walker, LMS, Mitelman, F, Alimena, G, Berger, R, Borqström, GH, Brandt, L, Catovsky, D, de la Chapelle, A, Dewald, GW, Garson, OM, Garwicz, S, Golomb, HM, Hossfeld, DK, Nilsson, P, Pierre, RJ, Philip, P, Prigogina, E, Sakurai, M, Sandberg, AA, Tricot, G, Van Den Berghe, H, Van Orshoven, AV, Vuopio, P, Whang-Peng, J & Bloomfield, CD 1983, 'Chromosomal Abnormalities and their Clinical Significance in Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia', Cancer Research, vol. 43, no. 2, pp. 868-873.
Rowley JD, Goldman AI, Lawler SD, Walker LMS, Mitelman F, Alimena G et al. Chromosomal Abnormalities and their Clinical Significance in Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia. Cancer Research. 1983 Feb 1;43(2):868-873.
Rowley, J. D. ; Goldman, A. I. ; Lawler, S. D. ; Walker, L. M.Seeker ; Mitelman, F. ; Alimena, G. ; Berger, R. ; Borqström, G. H. ; Brandt, L. ; Catovsky, D. ; de la Chapelle, A. ; Dewald, G. W. ; Garson, O. M. ; Garwicz, S. ; Golomb, H. M. ; Hossfeld, D. K. ; Nilsson, P. ; Pierre, R. J. ; Philip, P. ; Prigogina, E. ; Sakurai, M. ; Sandberg, A. A. ; Tricot, G. ; Van Den Berghe, H. ; Van Orshoven, A. V. ; Vuopio, P. ; Whang-Peng, J. ; Bloomfield, C. D. / Chromosomal Abnormalities and their Clinical Significance in Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia. In: Cancer Research. 1983 ; Vol. 43, No. 2. pp. 868-873.
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abstract = "Three hundred thirty newly diagnosed patients were studied to determine the frequency and type of chromosomal abnormalities in acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and their clinical significance. Analyses of banded chromosomes revealed clonal chromosomal abnormalities in 218 patients (66{\%}), including all cases of B-ALL; and 70{\%} of non-T, non-B ALL; but only 39{\%} of T-ALL (p < 0.001). Patients were classified into 10 groups according to karyotype: no abnormalities (34{\%}), one of the following recurring structural abnormalities [the Philadelphia chromosome (12{\%}), t(4;11) (5{\%}), t(8;14) (5{\%}), 14q+ (4.5{\%}), 6q— (4{\%})] or, in the remaining cases with abnormalities, the modal number [<46 (5{\%}), 46 (12{\%}), 47 to 50 (8{\%}), >50 (9{\%})]. Response to treatment (achievement of complete remission and remission duration) and survival differed significantly among chromosome groups (p < 0.002). The best responses were seen in patients with a modal number >50; the poorest responses were found in patients with the t(4; 11) and t(8;14). Interestingly, survival for children and adults who had karyotypes with the same specific structural abnormalities [e.g., the Philadelphia chromosome or t(4; 11)] was identical. Multivariate analysis demonstrated that the karyotypic pattern was an independent prognostic factor even when age, initial leukocyte count, and French-American-British (FAB) type were considered. We conclude that banded chromosome studies should be performed in all patients with ALL at diagnosis to identify those patients who have a pattern associated with a poor prognosis who may require more aggressive therapeutic approaches such as marrow transplantation.",
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AU - Walker, L. M.Seeker

AU - Mitelman, F.

AU - Alimena, G.

AU - Berger, R.

AU - Borqström, G. H.

AU - Brandt, L.

AU - Catovsky, D.

AU - de la Chapelle, A.

AU - Dewald, G. W.

AU - Garson, O. M.

AU - Garwicz, S.

AU - Golomb, H. M.

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AU - Nilsson, P.

AU - Pierre, R. J.

AU - Philip, P.

AU - Prigogina, E.

AU - Sakurai, M.

AU - Sandberg, A. A.

AU - Tricot, G.

AU - Van Den Berghe, H.

AU - Van Orshoven, A. V.

AU - Vuopio, P.

AU - Whang-Peng, J.

AU - Bloomfield, C. D.

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