Chinese-Australians' knowledge of depression and schizophrenia in the context of their under-utilization of mental health care: An analysis of labelling

Steven Klimidis, Fei-Shiou Shiau, Iraklis Harry Minas

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

26 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Low knowledge of and discrimination regarding mental disorders (MDs) may underpin lower access to mental health care by ethnic minority groups. Aims: In Chinese-Australians, in relation to schizophrenia and depression, to assess (a) labels attached to MDs, (b) conceptual distinctiveness of MDs, (c) labelling accuracy against an Australian representative sample, (d) how syndrome variations may influence labelling, and (e) effects of exposure to MDs on labelling. Method: 418 subjects were asked to indicate the labels they would apply to vignettes of depression and schizophrenia and whether they were exposed to these disorders personally or socially. Results: The sample was broadly representative of the Australian-Chinese community: 51% and 47% 'correctly' labelled the vignettes. Depression and schizophrenia labels were consistently discriminated and clustered with different other labels. Labelling accuracy surpassed Australians'. Labelling did not vary substantially between syndromes. Exposure related to increased labelling accuracy for depression. Conclusions: Accuracy in labelling major forms of MDs does not appear low in Chinese-Australians and seems higher than in the Australian community. MDs were discriminated although syndrome variations were not. Findings dispute that low mental health care access and uptake is due to low recognition and discrimination of MDs in Chinese-Australians.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)464-478
Number of pages15
JournalInternational Journal of Social Psychiatry
Volume53
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 2007

Fingerprint

Patient Acceptance of Health Care
Mental Disorders
Schizophrenia
Mental Health
Depression
Minority Groups
Health Services Accessibility
Dissent and Disputes
Ethnic Groups
Delivery of Health Care

Keywords

  • Chinese
  • Depression
  • Ethnic minority groups
  • Explanatory models
  • Illness labels
  • Mental health literacy
  • Schizophrenia
  • Service utilization

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Chinese-Australians' knowledge of depression and schizophrenia in the context of their under-utilization of mental health care : An analysis of labelling. / Klimidis, Steven; Shiau, Fei-Shiou; Minas, Iraklis Harry.

In: International Journal of Social Psychiatry, Vol. 53, No. 5, 09.2007, p. 464-478.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{0203cf4992cb4740ac1cb21881fd5139,
title = "Chinese-Australians' knowledge of depression and schizophrenia in the context of their under-utilization of mental health care: An analysis of labelling",
abstract = "Background: Low knowledge of and discrimination regarding mental disorders (MDs) may underpin lower access to mental health care by ethnic minority groups. Aims: In Chinese-Australians, in relation to schizophrenia and depression, to assess (a) labels attached to MDs, (b) conceptual distinctiveness of MDs, (c) labelling accuracy against an Australian representative sample, (d) how syndrome variations may influence labelling, and (e) effects of exposure to MDs on labelling. Method: 418 subjects were asked to indicate the labels they would apply to vignettes of depression and schizophrenia and whether they were exposed to these disorders personally or socially. Results: The sample was broadly representative of the Australian-Chinese community: 51{\%} and 47{\%} 'correctly' labelled the vignettes. Depression and schizophrenia labels were consistently discriminated and clustered with different other labels. Labelling accuracy surpassed Australians'. Labelling did not vary substantially between syndromes. Exposure related to increased labelling accuracy for depression. Conclusions: Accuracy in labelling major forms of MDs does not appear low in Chinese-Australians and seems higher than in the Australian community. MDs were discriminated although syndrome variations were not. Findings dispute that low mental health care access and uptake is due to low recognition and discrimination of MDs in Chinese-Australians.",
keywords = "Chinese, Depression, Ethnic minority groups, Explanatory models, Illness labels, Mental health literacy, Schizophrenia, Service utilization",
author = "Steven Klimidis and Fei-Shiou Shiau and Minas, {Iraklis Harry}",
year = "2007",
month = "9",
doi = "10.1177/0020764007078357",
language = "English",
volume = "53",
pages = "464--478",
journal = "International Journal of Social Psychiatry",
issn = "0020-7640",
publisher = "SAGE Publications Ltd",
number = "5",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Chinese-Australians' knowledge of depression and schizophrenia in the context of their under-utilization of mental health care

T2 - An analysis of labelling

AU - Klimidis, Steven

AU - Shiau, Fei-Shiou

AU - Minas, Iraklis Harry

PY - 2007/9

Y1 - 2007/9

N2 - Background: Low knowledge of and discrimination regarding mental disorders (MDs) may underpin lower access to mental health care by ethnic minority groups. Aims: In Chinese-Australians, in relation to schizophrenia and depression, to assess (a) labels attached to MDs, (b) conceptual distinctiveness of MDs, (c) labelling accuracy against an Australian representative sample, (d) how syndrome variations may influence labelling, and (e) effects of exposure to MDs on labelling. Method: 418 subjects were asked to indicate the labels they would apply to vignettes of depression and schizophrenia and whether they were exposed to these disorders personally or socially. Results: The sample was broadly representative of the Australian-Chinese community: 51% and 47% 'correctly' labelled the vignettes. Depression and schizophrenia labels were consistently discriminated and clustered with different other labels. Labelling accuracy surpassed Australians'. Labelling did not vary substantially between syndromes. Exposure related to increased labelling accuracy for depression. Conclusions: Accuracy in labelling major forms of MDs does not appear low in Chinese-Australians and seems higher than in the Australian community. MDs were discriminated although syndrome variations were not. Findings dispute that low mental health care access and uptake is due to low recognition and discrimination of MDs in Chinese-Australians.

AB - Background: Low knowledge of and discrimination regarding mental disorders (MDs) may underpin lower access to mental health care by ethnic minority groups. Aims: In Chinese-Australians, in relation to schizophrenia and depression, to assess (a) labels attached to MDs, (b) conceptual distinctiveness of MDs, (c) labelling accuracy against an Australian representative sample, (d) how syndrome variations may influence labelling, and (e) effects of exposure to MDs on labelling. Method: 418 subjects were asked to indicate the labels they would apply to vignettes of depression and schizophrenia and whether they were exposed to these disorders personally or socially. Results: The sample was broadly representative of the Australian-Chinese community: 51% and 47% 'correctly' labelled the vignettes. Depression and schizophrenia labels were consistently discriminated and clustered with different other labels. Labelling accuracy surpassed Australians'. Labelling did not vary substantially between syndromes. Exposure related to increased labelling accuracy for depression. Conclusions: Accuracy in labelling major forms of MDs does not appear low in Chinese-Australians and seems higher than in the Australian community. MDs were discriminated although syndrome variations were not. Findings dispute that low mental health care access and uptake is due to low recognition and discrimination of MDs in Chinese-Australians.

KW - Chinese

KW - Depression

KW - Ethnic minority groups

KW - Explanatory models

KW - Illness labels

KW - Mental health literacy

KW - Schizophrenia

KW - Service utilization

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=34548717755&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=34548717755&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1177/0020764007078357

DO - 10.1177/0020764007078357

M3 - Article

C2 - 18018667

AN - SCOPUS:34548717755

VL - 53

SP - 464

EP - 478

JO - International Journal of Social Psychiatry

JF - International Journal of Social Psychiatry

SN - 0020-7640

IS - 5

ER -