Characteristics of group a streptococcal bacteremia with comparison between children and adults

Y. C. Huang, C. H. Chiu, L. Y. Chang, H. S. Leu, T. Y. Lin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This retrospective study aimed to compare the characteristics of group A streptococcal bacteremia in children and adults. A total of 76 (12 children and 64 adults) patients with group A streptococcal bacteremia treated from October 1995 through September 2000 at the Linko Chang Gung Memorial Hospital were included. The mean age was 47.6 years (range, 12 days-90 years). Forty-four (57.9%) patients had predisposing medical conditions. Malignant cancer (23.7%) and diabetes (22.4%) were the 2 most common conditions, which occurred only in adults. Two (16.7%) children had chickenpox associated with secondary group A streptococcal bacteremia. Skin and soft tissue infection (60.5%) was the most common clinical manifestation. The mortality rate related to group A streptococcal bacteremia was 25%. Twelve patients met the criteria of streptococcal toxic shock syndrome and 6 (50%) were children (p<0.05). Despite immediate and aggressive treatment, mortality due to streptococcal toxic shock syndrome was 66.7%. The incidence of streptococcal toxic shock syndrome was much higher in children (50%) than in adults (9.4%). Early diagnosis of invasive group A streptococcal infections and streptococcal toxic shock syndrome requires awareness of the presentations and a high level of suspicion. For fulminant group A streptococcal infection, a combination of a β-lactam antibiotic plus clindamycin and/or adjuvant therapy with intravenous immunoglobulin is recommended.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)195-200
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Microbiology, Immunology and Infection
Volume34
Issue number3
Publication statusPublished - 2001
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Bacteremia
Septic Shock
Streptococcal Infections
Lactams
Soft Tissue Infections
Clindamycin
Chickenpox
Mortality
Intravenous Immunoglobulins
Early Diagnosis
Retrospective Studies
Anti-Bacterial Agents
Skin
Incidence
Therapeutics
Neoplasms

Keywords

  • Bacteremia group A Streptococcus
  • Streptococcal toxic shock syndrome

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Microbiology (medical)
  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Immunology and Microbiology(all)

Cite this

Characteristics of group a streptococcal bacteremia with comparison between children and adults. / Huang, Y. C.; Chiu, C. H.; Chang, L. Y.; Leu, H. S.; Lin, T. Y.

In: Journal of Microbiology, Immunology and Infection, Vol. 34, No. 3, 2001, p. 195-200.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{b372cebb3ab84f6aa8782ab536f5c9b3,
title = "Characteristics of group a streptococcal bacteremia with comparison between children and adults",
abstract = "This retrospective study aimed to compare the characteristics of group A streptococcal bacteremia in children and adults. A total of 76 (12 children and 64 adults) patients with group A streptococcal bacteremia treated from October 1995 through September 2000 at the Linko Chang Gung Memorial Hospital were included. The mean age was 47.6 years (range, 12 days-90 years). Forty-four (57.9{\%}) patients had predisposing medical conditions. Malignant cancer (23.7{\%}) and diabetes (22.4{\%}) were the 2 most common conditions, which occurred only in adults. Two (16.7{\%}) children had chickenpox associated with secondary group A streptococcal bacteremia. Skin and soft tissue infection (60.5{\%}) was the most common clinical manifestation. The mortality rate related to group A streptococcal bacteremia was 25{\%}. Twelve patients met the criteria of streptococcal toxic shock syndrome and 6 (50{\%}) were children (p<0.05). Despite immediate and aggressive treatment, mortality due to streptococcal toxic shock syndrome was 66.7{\%}. The incidence of streptococcal toxic shock syndrome was much higher in children (50{\%}) than in adults (9.4{\%}). Early diagnosis of invasive group A streptococcal infections and streptococcal toxic shock syndrome requires awareness of the presentations and a high level of suspicion. For fulminant group A streptococcal infection, a combination of a β-lactam antibiotic plus clindamycin and/or adjuvant therapy with intravenous immunoglobulin is recommended.",
keywords = "Bacteremia group A Streptococcus, Streptococcal toxic shock syndrome",
author = "Huang, {Y. C.} and Chiu, {C. H.} and Chang, {L. Y.} and Leu, {H. S.} and Lin, {T. Y.}",
year = "2001",
language = "English",
volume = "34",
pages = "195--200",
journal = "Journal of Microbiology, Immunology and Infection",
issn = "0253-2662",
publisher = "Elsevier Taiwan LLC",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Characteristics of group a streptococcal bacteremia with comparison between children and adults

AU - Huang, Y. C.

AU - Chiu, C. H.

AU - Chang, L. Y.

AU - Leu, H. S.

AU - Lin, T. Y.

PY - 2001

Y1 - 2001

N2 - This retrospective study aimed to compare the characteristics of group A streptococcal bacteremia in children and adults. A total of 76 (12 children and 64 adults) patients with group A streptococcal bacteremia treated from October 1995 through September 2000 at the Linko Chang Gung Memorial Hospital were included. The mean age was 47.6 years (range, 12 days-90 years). Forty-four (57.9%) patients had predisposing medical conditions. Malignant cancer (23.7%) and diabetes (22.4%) were the 2 most common conditions, which occurred only in adults. Two (16.7%) children had chickenpox associated with secondary group A streptococcal bacteremia. Skin and soft tissue infection (60.5%) was the most common clinical manifestation. The mortality rate related to group A streptococcal bacteremia was 25%. Twelve patients met the criteria of streptococcal toxic shock syndrome and 6 (50%) were children (p<0.05). Despite immediate and aggressive treatment, mortality due to streptococcal toxic shock syndrome was 66.7%. The incidence of streptococcal toxic shock syndrome was much higher in children (50%) than in adults (9.4%). Early diagnosis of invasive group A streptococcal infections and streptococcal toxic shock syndrome requires awareness of the presentations and a high level of suspicion. For fulminant group A streptococcal infection, a combination of a β-lactam antibiotic plus clindamycin and/or adjuvant therapy with intravenous immunoglobulin is recommended.

AB - This retrospective study aimed to compare the characteristics of group A streptococcal bacteremia in children and adults. A total of 76 (12 children and 64 adults) patients with group A streptococcal bacteremia treated from October 1995 through September 2000 at the Linko Chang Gung Memorial Hospital were included. The mean age was 47.6 years (range, 12 days-90 years). Forty-four (57.9%) patients had predisposing medical conditions. Malignant cancer (23.7%) and diabetes (22.4%) were the 2 most common conditions, which occurred only in adults. Two (16.7%) children had chickenpox associated with secondary group A streptococcal bacteremia. Skin and soft tissue infection (60.5%) was the most common clinical manifestation. The mortality rate related to group A streptococcal bacteremia was 25%. Twelve patients met the criteria of streptococcal toxic shock syndrome and 6 (50%) were children (p<0.05). Despite immediate and aggressive treatment, mortality due to streptococcal toxic shock syndrome was 66.7%. The incidence of streptococcal toxic shock syndrome was much higher in children (50%) than in adults (9.4%). Early diagnosis of invasive group A streptococcal infections and streptococcal toxic shock syndrome requires awareness of the presentations and a high level of suspicion. For fulminant group A streptococcal infection, a combination of a β-lactam antibiotic plus clindamycin and/or adjuvant therapy with intravenous immunoglobulin is recommended.

KW - Bacteremia group A Streptococcus

KW - Streptococcal toxic shock syndrome

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0034786354&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0034786354&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

C2 - 11605811

AN - SCOPUS:0034786354

VL - 34

SP - 195

EP - 200

JO - Journal of Microbiology, Immunology and Infection

JF - Journal of Microbiology, Immunology and Infection

SN - 0253-2662

IS - 3

ER -