Changes in intraocular pressure and ocular perfusion pressure after latanoprost 0.005% or Brimonidine tartrate 0.2% in Normal-tension glaucoma patients

Catherine Jui ling Liu, Yu Chieh Ko, Ching Yu Cheng, Allen W. Chiu, Joe C. Chou, Wen-Ming Hsu, Jorn Hon Liu

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Abstract

Objective: To evaluate and compare the effects of latanoprost 0.005% once daily and brimonidine tartrate 0.2% twice daily in patients with normal-tension glaucoma (NTG). Design: A randomized, open-label, crossover study. Participants: Twenty-eight NTG patients with progressive visual field defects/optic disc excavation, new disc hemorrhage, or field defects that threatened fixation. Intervention: Patients were randomly allocated to one of two groups. Patients in group 1 were treated with latanoprost, lubricant, and brimonidine for 4 weeks each, whereas patients in group 2 were treated with brimonidine, lubricant, and latanoprost for 4 weeks each. Main Outcome Measures: Intraocular pressure (IOP), pulse rate, and blood pressure were measured at 8 am, 12 noon, and 4 pm after each 4-week treatment. Ocular perfusion pressure (OPP) was calculated. Results: Latanoprost and brimonidine reduced the average IOP by 3.6 ± 1.9 mmHg (P < 0.001) and 2.5 ± 1.3 mmHg (P <0.001), respectively, with a significant difference between the two regimens (P = 0.009). Both drugs significantly reduced IOP at each time point. Latanoprost decreased IOP significantly more than did brimonidine at 8 am (11.7 ± 2.2 mmHg vs. 13.7 ± 2.1 mmHg, P = 0.004) and 4 pm (11.4 ± 2.1 mmHg vs. 13.2 ± 2.9 mmHg, P = 0.004), but IOP was equal between the two agents at 12 noon (11.5 ± 2.6 mmHg vs. 11.5 ± 2.3 mmHg, P = 0.967). IOP was maintained at 12 mmHg or lower in 18 (66.7%) of 27 patients after treatment with latanoprost and in 9 (33.3%) of 27 patients after treatment with brimonidine. Latanoprost monotherapy reduced IOP by 30% in 8 patients (29.6%), but brimonidine monotherapy did not reduce IOP by that much in any of the patients. OPP increased after latanoprost treatment (P < 0.001) but did not increase after brimonidine treatment (P = 0.355). There was no significant change in pulse rate or blood pressure. Conclusions: Both latanoprost and brimonidine reduce IOP in NTG patients. Brimonidine has a peak IOP-lowering effect equal to that of latanoprost but produces a higher mean diurnal IOP than does latanoprost because of its shorter effect. Latanoprost might favorably alter optic disc blood perfusion by increasing OPP.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2241-2247
Number of pages7
JournalOphthalmology
Volume109
Issue number12
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 1 2002
Externally publishedYes

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latanoprost
Low Tension Glaucoma
Intraocular Pressure
Perfusion
Pressure
Blood Pressure
Lubricants
Optic Disk
Brimonidine Tartrate
Heart Rate

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ophthalmology

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Changes in intraocular pressure and ocular perfusion pressure after latanoprost 0.005% or Brimonidine tartrate 0.2% in Normal-tension glaucoma patients. / Liu, Catherine Jui ling; Ko, Yu Chieh; Cheng, Ching Yu; Chiu, Allen W.; Chou, Joe C.; Hsu, Wen-Ming; Liu, Jorn Hon.

In: Ophthalmology, Vol. 109, No. 12, 01.12.2002, p. 2241-2247.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Liu, Catherine Jui ling ; Ko, Yu Chieh ; Cheng, Ching Yu ; Chiu, Allen W. ; Chou, Joe C. ; Hsu, Wen-Ming ; Liu, Jorn Hon. / Changes in intraocular pressure and ocular perfusion pressure after latanoprost 0.005% or Brimonidine tartrate 0.2% in Normal-tension glaucoma patients. In: Ophthalmology. 2002 ; Vol. 109, No. 12. pp. 2241-2247.
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title = "Changes in intraocular pressure and ocular perfusion pressure after latanoprost 0.005{\%} or Brimonidine tartrate 0.2{\%} in Normal-tension glaucoma patients",
abstract = "Objective: To evaluate and compare the effects of latanoprost 0.005{\%} once daily and brimonidine tartrate 0.2{\%} twice daily in patients with normal-tension glaucoma (NTG). Design: A randomized, open-label, crossover study. Participants: Twenty-eight NTG patients with progressive visual field defects/optic disc excavation, new disc hemorrhage, or field defects that threatened fixation. Intervention: Patients were randomly allocated to one of two groups. Patients in group 1 were treated with latanoprost, lubricant, and brimonidine for 4 weeks each, whereas patients in group 2 were treated with brimonidine, lubricant, and latanoprost for 4 weeks each. Main Outcome Measures: Intraocular pressure (IOP), pulse rate, and blood pressure were measured at 8 am, 12 noon, and 4 pm after each 4-week treatment. Ocular perfusion pressure (OPP) was calculated. Results: Latanoprost and brimonidine reduced the average IOP by 3.6 ± 1.9 mmHg (P < 0.001) and 2.5 ± 1.3 mmHg (P <0.001), respectively, with a significant difference between the two regimens (P = 0.009). Both drugs significantly reduced IOP at each time point. Latanoprost decreased IOP significantly more than did brimonidine at 8 am (11.7 ± 2.2 mmHg vs. 13.7 ± 2.1 mmHg, P = 0.004) and 4 pm (11.4 ± 2.1 mmHg vs. 13.2 ± 2.9 mmHg, P = 0.004), but IOP was equal between the two agents at 12 noon (11.5 ± 2.6 mmHg vs. 11.5 ± 2.3 mmHg, P = 0.967). IOP was maintained at 12 mmHg or lower in 18 (66.7{\%}) of 27 patients after treatment with latanoprost and in 9 (33.3{\%}) of 27 patients after treatment with brimonidine. Latanoprost monotherapy reduced IOP by 30{\%} in 8 patients (29.6{\%}), but brimonidine monotherapy did not reduce IOP by that much in any of the patients. OPP increased after latanoprost treatment (P < 0.001) but did not increase after brimonidine treatment (P = 0.355). There was no significant change in pulse rate or blood pressure. Conclusions: Both latanoprost and brimonidine reduce IOP in NTG patients. Brimonidine has a peak IOP-lowering effect equal to that of latanoprost but produces a higher mean diurnal IOP than does latanoprost because of its shorter effect. Latanoprost might favorably alter optic disc blood perfusion by increasing OPP.",
author = "Liu, {Catherine Jui ling} and Ko, {Yu Chieh} and Cheng, {Ching Yu} and Chiu, {Allen W.} and Chou, {Joe C.} and Wen-Ming Hsu and Liu, {Jorn Hon}",
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T1 - Changes in intraocular pressure and ocular perfusion pressure after latanoprost 0.005% or Brimonidine tartrate 0.2% in Normal-tension glaucoma patients

AU - Liu, Catherine Jui ling

AU - Ko, Yu Chieh

AU - Cheng, Ching Yu

AU - Chiu, Allen W.

AU - Chou, Joe C.

AU - Hsu, Wen-Ming

AU - Liu, Jorn Hon

PY - 2002/12/1

Y1 - 2002/12/1

N2 - Objective: To evaluate and compare the effects of latanoprost 0.005% once daily and brimonidine tartrate 0.2% twice daily in patients with normal-tension glaucoma (NTG). Design: A randomized, open-label, crossover study. Participants: Twenty-eight NTG patients with progressive visual field defects/optic disc excavation, new disc hemorrhage, or field defects that threatened fixation. Intervention: Patients were randomly allocated to one of two groups. Patients in group 1 were treated with latanoprost, lubricant, and brimonidine for 4 weeks each, whereas patients in group 2 were treated with brimonidine, lubricant, and latanoprost for 4 weeks each. Main Outcome Measures: Intraocular pressure (IOP), pulse rate, and blood pressure were measured at 8 am, 12 noon, and 4 pm after each 4-week treatment. Ocular perfusion pressure (OPP) was calculated. Results: Latanoprost and brimonidine reduced the average IOP by 3.6 ± 1.9 mmHg (P < 0.001) and 2.5 ± 1.3 mmHg (P <0.001), respectively, with a significant difference between the two regimens (P = 0.009). Both drugs significantly reduced IOP at each time point. Latanoprost decreased IOP significantly more than did brimonidine at 8 am (11.7 ± 2.2 mmHg vs. 13.7 ± 2.1 mmHg, P = 0.004) and 4 pm (11.4 ± 2.1 mmHg vs. 13.2 ± 2.9 mmHg, P = 0.004), but IOP was equal between the two agents at 12 noon (11.5 ± 2.6 mmHg vs. 11.5 ± 2.3 mmHg, P = 0.967). IOP was maintained at 12 mmHg or lower in 18 (66.7%) of 27 patients after treatment with latanoprost and in 9 (33.3%) of 27 patients after treatment with brimonidine. Latanoprost monotherapy reduced IOP by 30% in 8 patients (29.6%), but brimonidine monotherapy did not reduce IOP by that much in any of the patients. OPP increased after latanoprost treatment (P < 0.001) but did not increase after brimonidine treatment (P = 0.355). There was no significant change in pulse rate or blood pressure. Conclusions: Both latanoprost and brimonidine reduce IOP in NTG patients. Brimonidine has a peak IOP-lowering effect equal to that of latanoprost but produces a higher mean diurnal IOP than does latanoprost because of its shorter effect. Latanoprost might favorably alter optic disc blood perfusion by increasing OPP.

AB - Objective: To evaluate and compare the effects of latanoprost 0.005% once daily and brimonidine tartrate 0.2% twice daily in patients with normal-tension glaucoma (NTG). Design: A randomized, open-label, crossover study. Participants: Twenty-eight NTG patients with progressive visual field defects/optic disc excavation, new disc hemorrhage, or field defects that threatened fixation. Intervention: Patients were randomly allocated to one of two groups. Patients in group 1 were treated with latanoprost, lubricant, and brimonidine for 4 weeks each, whereas patients in group 2 were treated with brimonidine, lubricant, and latanoprost for 4 weeks each. Main Outcome Measures: Intraocular pressure (IOP), pulse rate, and blood pressure were measured at 8 am, 12 noon, and 4 pm after each 4-week treatment. Ocular perfusion pressure (OPP) was calculated. Results: Latanoprost and brimonidine reduced the average IOP by 3.6 ± 1.9 mmHg (P < 0.001) and 2.5 ± 1.3 mmHg (P <0.001), respectively, with a significant difference between the two regimens (P = 0.009). Both drugs significantly reduced IOP at each time point. Latanoprost decreased IOP significantly more than did brimonidine at 8 am (11.7 ± 2.2 mmHg vs. 13.7 ± 2.1 mmHg, P = 0.004) and 4 pm (11.4 ± 2.1 mmHg vs. 13.2 ± 2.9 mmHg, P = 0.004), but IOP was equal between the two agents at 12 noon (11.5 ± 2.6 mmHg vs. 11.5 ± 2.3 mmHg, P = 0.967). IOP was maintained at 12 mmHg or lower in 18 (66.7%) of 27 patients after treatment with latanoprost and in 9 (33.3%) of 27 patients after treatment with brimonidine. Latanoprost monotherapy reduced IOP by 30% in 8 patients (29.6%), but brimonidine monotherapy did not reduce IOP by that much in any of the patients. OPP increased after latanoprost treatment (P < 0.001) but did not increase after brimonidine treatment (P = 0.355). There was no significant change in pulse rate or blood pressure. Conclusions: Both latanoprost and brimonidine reduce IOP in NTG patients. Brimonidine has a peak IOP-lowering effect equal to that of latanoprost but produces a higher mean diurnal IOP than does latanoprost because of its shorter effect. Latanoprost might favorably alter optic disc blood perfusion by increasing OPP.

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