Cerebral response to patient's own name in the vegetative and minimally conscious states

Haibo Di, Senming Yu, Xuchu Weng, Steven Laureys, Dan Yu, J.Q. Li, Pengmin Qin, Yihong Zhu, Suzhan Zhang, Yu Chen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

228 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

BACKGROUND: A challenge in the management of severely brain-damaged patients with altered states of consciousness is the differential diagnosis between the vegetative state (VS) and the minimally conscious state (MCS), especially for the gray zone separating these clinical entities. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the differences in brain activation in response to presentation of the patient's own name spoken by a familiar voice (SON-FV) in patients with VS and MCS. METHODS: By using fMRI, we prospectively studied residual cerebral activation to SON-FV in seven patients with VS and four with MCS. Behavioral evaluation was performed by means of standardized testing up to 3 months post-fMRI. RESULTS: Two patients with VS failed to show any significant cerebral activation. Three patients with VS showed SON-FV induced activation within the primary auditory cortex. Finally, two patients with VS and all four patients with MCS not only showed activation in primary auditory cortex but also in hierarchically higher order associative temporal areas. These two patients with VS showing the most widespread activation subsequently showed clinical improvement to MCS observed 3 months after their fMRI scan. CONCLUSION: The cerebral responses to patient's own name spoken by a familiar voice as measured by fMRI might be a useful tool to preclinically distinguish minimally conscious state-like cognitive processing in some patients behaviorally classified as vegetative. ©2007AAN Enterprises, Inc.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)895-899
Number of pages5
JournalNeurology
Volume68
Issue number12
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2007
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Persistent Vegetative State
Names
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Auditory Cortex
Brain
Consciousness

Keywords

  • adult
  • article
  • auditory cortex
  • auditory stimulation
  • behavior
  • brain function
  • clinical article
  • cognition
  • controlled study
  • female
  • functional magnetic resonance imaging
  • human
  • male
  • minimally conscious state
  • persistent vegetative state
  • priority journal
  • prospective study
  • voice
  • Acoustic Stimulation
  • Adult
  • Auditory Cortex
  • Auditory Perception
  • Awareness
  • Brain Mapping
  • Cerebral Cortex
  • Consciousness
  • Diagnosis, Differential
  • Female
  • Humans
  • Magnetic Resonance Imaging
  • Male
  • Middle Aged
  • Nerve Net
  • Persistent Vegetative State
  • Predictive Value of Tests
  • Prospective Studies

Cite this

Di, H., Yu, S., Weng, X., Laureys, S., Yu, D., Li, J. Q., ... Chen, Y. (2007). Cerebral response to patient's own name in the vegetative and minimally conscious states. Neurology, 68(12), 895-899. https://doi.org/10.1212/01.wnl.0000258544.79024.d0

Cerebral response to patient's own name in the vegetative and minimally conscious states. / Di, Haibo; Yu, Senming; Weng, Xuchu; Laureys, Steven; Yu, Dan; Li, J.Q.; Qin, Pengmin; Zhu, Yihong; Zhang, Suzhan; Chen, Yu.

In: Neurology, Vol. 68, No. 12, 2007, p. 895-899.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Di, H, Yu, S, Weng, X, Laureys, S, Yu, D, Li, JQ, Qin, P, Zhu, Y, Zhang, S & Chen, Y 2007, 'Cerebral response to patient's own name in the vegetative and minimally conscious states', Neurology, vol. 68, no. 12, pp. 895-899. https://doi.org/10.1212/01.wnl.0000258544.79024.d0
Di, Haibo ; Yu, Senming ; Weng, Xuchu ; Laureys, Steven ; Yu, Dan ; Li, J.Q. ; Qin, Pengmin ; Zhu, Yihong ; Zhang, Suzhan ; Chen, Yu. / Cerebral response to patient's own name in the vegetative and minimally conscious states. In: Neurology. 2007 ; Vol. 68, No. 12. pp. 895-899.
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note = "被引用次數:177 Export Date: 31 March 2016 CODEN: NEURA 通訊地址: Chen, Y.Z.; Zhejiang University School of Medicine, Hangzhou 310006, China; 電子郵件: yzchen0928@yahoo.com 參考文獻: Laureys, S., Owen, A.M., Schiff, N.D., Brain function in coma, vegetative state, and related disorders (2004) Lancet Neurol, 3, pp. 537-546; Schiff, N.D., Modeling the minimally conscious state: Measurements of brain function and therapeutic possibilities (2005) Prog Brain Res, 150, pp. 473-493; Laureys, S., Faymonville, M.E., Degueldre, C., Auditory processing in the vegetative state (2000) Brain, 123, pp. 1589-1601; Boly, M., Faymonville, M.E., Peigneux, P., Auditory processing in severely brain injured patients: Differences between the minimally conscious state and the persistent vegetative state (2004) Arch Neurol, 61, pp. 233-238; De Jong, B.M., Willemsen, A.T.M., Paas, A.M.J., (1997) Regional cerebral blood flow changes related to affective speech presentation in persistent vegetative state. Clin Neurol Neurosurg, 99, pp. 213-216; Owen, A.M., Coleman, M.R., Menon, D.K., Residual auditory function in persistent vegetative state: A combined PET and fMRI study (2005) Neuropsychol Rehabil, 15, pp. 290-306; Menon, D.K., Owen, A.M., Williams, E.J., Cortical processing in persistent vegetative state (1998) Lancet, 352, p. 200; Owen, A.M., Menon, D.K., Johnsrude, I.S., Detecting residual cognitive function in persistent vegetative state (2002) Neurocase, 8, pp. 394-403; Mack, A., Pappas, Z., Silverman, M., Gay, R., What we see: Inattention and the capture of attention by meaning (2002) Conscious Cogn, 11, pp. 488-506; Laureys, S., Perrin, F., Faymonville, M.E., Cerebral processing in the minimally conscious state (2004) Neurology, 63, pp. 916-918; Holeckova, I., Fischer, C., Giard, M.-H., Delpuech, C., Morlet, D., Brain response to a subject's own name uttered by a familiar voice (2006) Brain Res, 1082, pp. 142-152; Born, J.D., Hans, P., Dexters, G., Practical assessment of brain dysfunction in severe head trauma (author's transl)] (1982) Neurochirurgie, 28, pp. 1-7; Teasdale, G., Jennett, B., Assessment of coma and impaired consciousness. A practical scale (1974) Lancet, 2, pp. 81-84; Giacino, J.T., Kalmar, K., Whyte, J., The JFK Coma Recovery Scale-Revised: Measurement characteristics and diagnostic utility (2004) Arch Phys Med Rehabil, 85, pp. 2020-2029; Shiel, A., Horn, S., Wilson, B.A., The Wessex Head Injury Matrix main scale: A preliminary report on a scale to assess and monitor patients recovery after severe head injury (2000) Clin Rehabil, 14, pp. 408-416; Wade, D.T., Johnston, C., The permanent vegetative state: Practical guidance on diagnosis and management (1999) BMJ, 319, pp. 841-844; Meeting summary-expert forum for drawing Chinese diagnostic criterion for VS. Chin J Emerg Med 2002;11:241Xiang, H., Lin, C., Ma, X., Involvement of the cerebellum in semantic discrimination: An fMRI study (2003) Hum Brain Mapp, 18, pp. 208-214; Xiao, Z., Lee, T., Zhang, J.X., Thirsty heroin addicts show different fMRI activations when exposed to water-related and drug-related cues (2006) Drug Alcohol Depend, 83, pp. 157-162; Cox, R.W., AFNI: Software for analysis and visualization of functional magnetic resonance neuroimages (1996) Comput Biomed Res, 29, pp. 162-173; Ward, B.D., (2006) Simultaneous inference for fMRI, , http://afni.nimh.nih.gov/pub/dist/doc/manual, data. Available at: Accessed December 25; Campain, R., Minckler, J., A note on the gross configurations of the human auditory cortex (1976) Brain Lang, 3, pp. 318-323; Jancke, L., Schlaug, G., Huang, Y., Steinmetz, H., Asymmetry of the planum parietale (1994) Neuroreport, 5, pp. 1161-1163; Emmorey, K., Allen, J.S., Bruss, J., Schenker, N., Damasio, H., A morphometric analysis of auditory brain regions in congenitally deaf adults (2003) Proc Natl Acad Sci USA, 100, pp. 10049-10054; Majerus, S., Gill-Thwaites, H., Andrews, K., Laureys, S., Behavioral evaluation of consciousness in severe brain damage (2005) Prog Brain Res, 150, pp. 397-413; Andrews, K., Murphy, L., Munday, R., Littlewood, C., Misdiagnosis of the vegetative state: Retrospective study in a rehabilitation unit (1996) BMJ, 313, pp. 13-16; Schiff, N.D., Rodriguez-Moreno, D., Kamal, A., fMRI reveals largescale network activation in minimally conscious patients (2005) Neurology, 64, pp. 514-523; Perrin, F., Maquet, P., Peigneux, P., Neural mechanisms involved in the detection of our first name: A combined ERPs and PET study (2005) Neuropsychologia, 43, pp. 12-19; Kjaer, T.W., Nowak, M., Lou, H.C., Reflective self-awareness and conscious states: PET evidence for a common midline parietofrontal core (2002) Neuroimage, 17, pp. 1080-1086; Vogeley, K., Bussfeld, P., Newen, A., Mind reading: Neural mechanisms of theory of mind and self-perspective (2001) Neuroimage, 14, pp. 170-181",
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TY - JOUR

T1 - Cerebral response to patient's own name in the vegetative and minimally conscious states

AU - Di, Haibo

AU - Yu, Senming

AU - Weng, Xuchu

AU - Laureys, Steven

AU - Yu, Dan

AU - Li, J.Q.

AU - Qin, Pengmin

AU - Zhu, Yihong

AU - Zhang, Suzhan

AU - Chen, Yu

N1 - 被引用次數:177 Export Date: 31 March 2016 CODEN: NEURA 通訊地址: Chen, Y.Z.; Zhejiang University School of Medicine, Hangzhou 310006, China; 電子郵件: yzchen0928@yahoo.com 參考文獻: Laureys, S., Owen, A.M., Schiff, N.D., Brain function in coma, vegetative state, and related disorders (2004) Lancet Neurol, 3, pp. 537-546; Schiff, N.D., Modeling the minimally conscious state: Measurements of brain function and therapeutic possibilities (2005) Prog Brain Res, 150, pp. 473-493; Laureys, S., Faymonville, M.E., Degueldre, C., Auditory processing in the vegetative state (2000) Brain, 123, pp. 1589-1601; Boly, M., Faymonville, M.E., Peigneux, P., Auditory processing in severely brain injured patients: Differences between the minimally conscious state and the persistent vegetative state (2004) Arch Neurol, 61, pp. 233-238; De Jong, B.M., Willemsen, A.T.M., Paas, A.M.J., (1997) Regional cerebral blood flow changes related to affective speech presentation in persistent vegetative state. Clin Neurol Neurosurg, 99, pp. 213-216; Owen, A.M., Coleman, M.R., Menon, D.K., Residual auditory function in persistent vegetative state: A combined PET and fMRI study (2005) Neuropsychol Rehabil, 15, pp. 290-306; Menon, D.K., Owen, A.M., Williams, E.J., Cortical processing in persistent vegetative state (1998) Lancet, 352, p. 200; Owen, A.M., Menon, D.K., Johnsrude, I.S., Detecting residual cognitive function in persistent vegetative state (2002) Neurocase, 8, pp. 394-403; Mack, A., Pappas, Z., Silverman, M., Gay, R., What we see: Inattention and the capture of attention by meaning (2002) Conscious Cogn, 11, pp. 488-506; Laureys, S., Perrin, F., Faymonville, M.E., Cerebral processing in the minimally conscious state (2004) Neurology, 63, pp. 916-918; Holeckova, I., Fischer, C., Giard, M.-H., Delpuech, C., Morlet, D., Brain response to a subject's own name uttered by a familiar voice (2006) Brain Res, 1082, pp. 142-152; Born, J.D., Hans, P., Dexters, G., Practical assessment of brain dysfunction in severe head trauma (author's transl)] (1982) Neurochirurgie, 28, pp. 1-7; Teasdale, G., Jennett, B., Assessment of coma and impaired consciousness. A practical scale (1974) Lancet, 2, pp. 81-84; Giacino, J.T., Kalmar, K., Whyte, J., The JFK Coma Recovery Scale-Revised: Measurement characteristics and diagnostic utility (2004) Arch Phys Med Rehabil, 85, pp. 2020-2029; Shiel, A., Horn, S., Wilson, B.A., The Wessex Head Injury Matrix main scale: A preliminary report on a scale to assess and monitor patients recovery after severe head injury (2000) Clin Rehabil, 14, pp. 408-416; Wade, D.T., Johnston, C., The permanent vegetative state: Practical guidance on diagnosis and management (1999) BMJ, 319, pp. 841-844; Meeting summary-expert forum for drawing Chinese diagnostic criterion for VS. Chin J Emerg Med 2002;11:241Xiang, H., Lin, C., Ma, X., Involvement of the cerebellum in semantic discrimination: An fMRI study (2003) Hum Brain Mapp, 18, pp. 208-214; Xiao, Z., Lee, T., Zhang, J.X., Thirsty heroin addicts show different fMRI activations when exposed to water-related and drug-related cues (2006) Drug Alcohol Depend, 83, pp. 157-162; Cox, R.W., AFNI: Software for analysis and visualization of functional magnetic resonance neuroimages (1996) Comput Biomed Res, 29, pp. 162-173; Ward, B.D., (2006) Simultaneous inference for fMRI, , http://afni.nimh.nih.gov/pub/dist/doc/manual, data. Available at: Accessed December 25; Campain, R., Minckler, J., A note on the gross configurations of the human auditory cortex (1976) Brain Lang, 3, pp. 318-323; Jancke, L., Schlaug, G., Huang, Y., Steinmetz, H., Asymmetry of the planum parietale (1994) Neuroreport, 5, pp. 1161-1163; Emmorey, K., Allen, J.S., Bruss, J., Schenker, N., Damasio, H., A morphometric analysis of auditory brain regions in congenitally deaf adults (2003) Proc Natl Acad Sci USA, 100, pp. 10049-10054; Majerus, S., Gill-Thwaites, H., Andrews, K., Laureys, S., Behavioral evaluation of consciousness in severe brain damage (2005) Prog Brain Res, 150, pp. 397-413; Andrews, K., Murphy, L., Munday, R., Littlewood, C., Misdiagnosis of the vegetative state: Retrospective study in a rehabilitation unit (1996) BMJ, 313, pp. 13-16; Schiff, N.D., Rodriguez-Moreno, D., Kamal, A., fMRI reveals largescale network activation in minimally conscious patients (2005) Neurology, 64, pp. 514-523; Perrin, F., Maquet, P., Peigneux, P., Neural mechanisms involved in the detection of our first name: A combined ERPs and PET study (2005) Neuropsychologia, 43, pp. 12-19; Kjaer, T.W., Nowak, M., Lou, H.C., Reflective self-awareness and conscious states: PET evidence for a common midline parietofrontal core (2002) Neuroimage, 17, pp. 1080-1086; Vogeley, K., Bussfeld, P., Newen, A., Mind reading: Neural mechanisms of theory of mind and self-perspective (2001) Neuroimage, 14, pp. 170-181

PY - 2007

Y1 - 2007

N2 - BACKGROUND: A challenge in the management of severely brain-damaged patients with altered states of consciousness is the differential diagnosis between the vegetative state (VS) and the minimally conscious state (MCS), especially for the gray zone separating these clinical entities. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the differences in brain activation in response to presentation of the patient's own name spoken by a familiar voice (SON-FV) in patients with VS and MCS. METHODS: By using fMRI, we prospectively studied residual cerebral activation to SON-FV in seven patients with VS and four with MCS. Behavioral evaluation was performed by means of standardized testing up to 3 months post-fMRI. RESULTS: Two patients with VS failed to show any significant cerebral activation. Three patients with VS showed SON-FV induced activation within the primary auditory cortex. Finally, two patients with VS and all four patients with MCS not only showed activation in primary auditory cortex but also in hierarchically higher order associative temporal areas. These two patients with VS showing the most widespread activation subsequently showed clinical improvement to MCS observed 3 months after their fMRI scan. CONCLUSION: The cerebral responses to patient's own name spoken by a familiar voice as measured by fMRI might be a useful tool to preclinically distinguish minimally conscious state-like cognitive processing in some patients behaviorally classified as vegetative. ©2007AAN Enterprises, Inc.

AB - BACKGROUND: A challenge in the management of severely brain-damaged patients with altered states of consciousness is the differential diagnosis between the vegetative state (VS) and the minimally conscious state (MCS), especially for the gray zone separating these clinical entities. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the differences in brain activation in response to presentation of the patient's own name spoken by a familiar voice (SON-FV) in patients with VS and MCS. METHODS: By using fMRI, we prospectively studied residual cerebral activation to SON-FV in seven patients with VS and four with MCS. Behavioral evaluation was performed by means of standardized testing up to 3 months post-fMRI. RESULTS: Two patients with VS failed to show any significant cerebral activation. Three patients with VS showed SON-FV induced activation within the primary auditory cortex. Finally, two patients with VS and all four patients with MCS not only showed activation in primary auditory cortex but also in hierarchically higher order associative temporal areas. These two patients with VS showing the most widespread activation subsequently showed clinical improvement to MCS observed 3 months after their fMRI scan. CONCLUSION: The cerebral responses to patient's own name spoken by a familiar voice as measured by fMRI might be a useful tool to preclinically distinguish minimally conscious state-like cognitive processing in some patients behaviorally classified as vegetative. ©2007AAN Enterprises, Inc.

KW - adult

KW - article

KW - auditory cortex

KW - auditory stimulation

KW - behavior

KW - brain function

KW - clinical article

KW - cognition

KW - controlled study

KW - female

KW - functional magnetic resonance imaging

KW - human

KW - male

KW - minimally conscious state

KW - persistent vegetative state

KW - priority journal

KW - prospective study

KW - voice

KW - Acoustic Stimulation

KW - Adult

KW - Auditory Cortex

KW - Auditory Perception

KW - Awareness

KW - Brain Mapping

KW - Cerebral Cortex

KW - Consciousness

KW - Diagnosis, Differential

KW - Female

KW - Humans

KW - Magnetic Resonance Imaging

KW - Male

KW - Middle Aged

KW - Nerve Net

KW - Persistent Vegetative State

KW - Predictive Value of Tests

KW - Prospective Studies

U2 - 10.1212/01.wnl.0000258544.79024.d0

DO - 10.1212/01.wnl.0000258544.79024.d0

M3 - Article

VL - 68

SP - 895

EP - 899

JO - Neurology

JF - Neurology

SN - 0028-3878

IS - 12

ER -