Caregiver support groups in patients with dementia

A meta-analysis

Ling Yu Chien, Hsin Chu, Jong Long Guo, Yuan-Mei Liao, Lu-I Chang, Chiung Hua Chen, Kuei-Ru Chou

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

107 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives Meta-analysis studies of specific types of support groups are limited. We conducted a review and assessment of the effectiveness of support groups for caregivers of demented patients, and examined the impact of support group characteristics. Methods A search of multiple, electronic databases including the Cochrane Library, Medline, PUBMED, and others was conducted; studies published between 1998 and 2009 were collected. Thirty quantitative journal articles that were true and quasi-experimental controlled trials on support groups for non-professional caregivers, including mutual support, psychoeducational, and educational groups were analyzed. Outcome indicators were psychological well-being, depression, burden, and social outcomes. Results Support groups showed a significant positive effect on caregivers' psychological well-being (Hedge's g = -0.44, 95% CI = -0.73, -0.15), depression (Hedge's g = -0.40, 95% CI = -0.72, -0.08), burden (Hedge's g = -0.23, 95% CI = -0.33, -0.13), and social outcomes (Hedge's g = 0.40, 95% CI = 0.09, 0.71). The use of theoretical models, and length and intensity of group sessions had a significant impact on the effect sizes for psychological well-being and depression. Ratio of female participation (for psychological well-being and depression) and average age (social outcomes) were significant predictor variables. Conclusions Support groups benefit caregivers and findings of this meta-analysis serve as immediate guidance for group facilitators. Future research should include additional outcome variables with our defined factors on effectiveness collected as demographic characteristic data for comparison. A more comprehensive understanding of the effectiveness of support groups is indicated to enhance outcomes for caregivers and patients.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1089-1098
Number of pages10
JournalInternational Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry
Volume26
Issue number10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2011

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Self-Help Groups
Caregivers
Dementia
Meta-Analysis
Depression
Psychology
Libraries
Theoretical Models
Demography
Databases

Keywords

  • caregiver
  • dementia
  • meta-analysis
  • support group

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geriatrics and Gerontology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Caregiver support groups in patients with dementia : A meta-analysis. / Chien, Ling Yu; Chu, Hsin; Guo, Jong Long; Liao, Yuan-Mei; Chang, Lu-I; Chen, Chiung Hua; Chou, Kuei-Ru.

In: International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, Vol. 26, No. 10, 10.2011, p. 1089-1098.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Chien, LY, Chu, H, Guo, JL, Liao, Y-M, Chang, L-I, Chen, CH & Chou, K-R 2011, 'Caregiver support groups in patients with dementia: A meta-analysis', International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, vol. 26, no. 10, pp. 1089-1098. https://doi.org/10.1002/gps.2660
Chien, Ling Yu ; Chu, Hsin ; Guo, Jong Long ; Liao, Yuan-Mei ; Chang, Lu-I ; Chen, Chiung Hua ; Chou, Kuei-Ru. / Caregiver support groups in patients with dementia : A meta-analysis. In: International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry. 2011 ; Vol. 26, No. 10. pp. 1089-1098.
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abstract = "Objectives Meta-analysis studies of specific types of support groups are limited. We conducted a review and assessment of the effectiveness of support groups for caregivers of demented patients, and examined the impact of support group characteristics. Methods A search of multiple, electronic databases including the Cochrane Library, Medline, PUBMED, and others was conducted; studies published between 1998 and 2009 were collected. Thirty quantitative journal articles that were true and quasi-experimental controlled trials on support groups for non-professional caregivers, including mutual support, psychoeducational, and educational groups were analyzed. Outcome indicators were psychological well-being, depression, burden, and social outcomes. Results Support groups showed a significant positive effect on caregivers' psychological well-being (Hedge's g = -0.44, 95{\%} CI = -0.73, -0.15), depression (Hedge's g = -0.40, 95{\%} CI = -0.72, -0.08), burden (Hedge's g = -0.23, 95{\%} CI = -0.33, -0.13), and social outcomes (Hedge's g = 0.40, 95{\%} CI = 0.09, 0.71). The use of theoretical models, and length and intensity of group sessions had a significant impact on the effect sizes for psychological well-being and depression. Ratio of female participation (for psychological well-being and depression) and average age (social outcomes) were significant predictor variables. Conclusions Support groups benefit caregivers and findings of this meta-analysis serve as immediate guidance for group facilitators. Future research should include additional outcome variables with our defined factors on effectiveness collected as demographic characteristic data for comparison. A more comprehensive understanding of the effectiveness of support groups is indicated to enhance outcomes for caregivers and patients.",
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