Cardiac vagal control and theoretical models of co-occurring depression and anxiety: A cross-sectional psychophysiological study of community elderly

Hsi Chung Chen, Cheryl C H Yang, Terry B J Kuo, Tung Ping Su, Pesus Chou

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: In order to elucidate the complex relationship between co-occurring depression and anxiety with cardiac autonomic function in the elderly, this study examined the correlation between cardiac vagal control (CVC) and pre-defined, theoretical factors from the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS).Methods: Three hundred fifty-four randomly selected Chinese male subjects aged ≥65 years and living in the community were enrolled. CVC was measured using a frequency-domain index of heart rate variability.Results: Confirmatory factor analysis showed that the flat tripartite model of HADS provided a modest advantage in model fit when compared with other theoretical factor solutions. In the flat tripartite model, there was a significant negative association between anhedonic depression and CVC. In contrast, autonomic anxiety showed a significant positive correlation with CVC. In the hierarchical tripartite model, negative affectivity was not directly associated with CVC; instead, it had positive and negative indirect effects on CVC via autonomic anxiety and anhedonic depression, respectively. As scores for negative affectivity increased, these specific indirect effects diminished.Conclusions: Among competing models of co-occurring depression and anxiety, constructs from tripartite models demonstrate fair conformity with the data but unique and distinct correlations with CVC. Negative affectivity may determine the relationship of anhedonic depression and autonomic anxiety with CVC. Separating affective symptoms under the constructs of the tripartite models helps disentangle complex associations between co-occurring depression and anxiety with CVC.

Original languageEnglish
Article number93
JournalBMC Psychiatry
Volume12
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 30 2012
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Theoretical Models
Anxiety
Cross-Sectional Studies
Depression
Affective Symptoms
Statistical Factor Analysis
Heart Rate

Keywords

  • Cardiac vagal control
  • Co-occurring depression and anxiety
  • Heart rate variability
  • The Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale
  • Tripartite model

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Cardiac vagal control and theoretical models of co-occurring depression and anxiety : A cross-sectional psychophysiological study of community elderly. / Chen, Hsi Chung; Yang, Cheryl C H; Kuo, Terry B J; Su, Tung Ping; Chou, Pesus.

In: BMC Psychiatry, Vol. 12, 93, 30.07.2012.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{b6e7675e1d4047d497b0502dd79a0f4d,
title = "Cardiac vagal control and theoretical models of co-occurring depression and anxiety: A cross-sectional psychophysiological study of community elderly",
abstract = "Background: In order to elucidate the complex relationship between co-occurring depression and anxiety with cardiac autonomic function in the elderly, this study examined the correlation between cardiac vagal control (CVC) and pre-defined, theoretical factors from the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS).Methods: Three hundred fifty-four randomly selected Chinese male subjects aged ≥65 years and living in the community were enrolled. CVC was measured using a frequency-domain index of heart rate variability.Results: Confirmatory factor analysis showed that the flat tripartite model of HADS provided a modest advantage in model fit when compared with other theoretical factor solutions. In the flat tripartite model, there was a significant negative association between anhedonic depression and CVC. In contrast, autonomic anxiety showed a significant positive correlation with CVC. In the hierarchical tripartite model, negative affectivity was not directly associated with CVC; instead, it had positive and negative indirect effects on CVC via autonomic anxiety and anhedonic depression, respectively. As scores for negative affectivity increased, these specific indirect effects diminished.Conclusions: Among competing models of co-occurring depression and anxiety, constructs from tripartite models demonstrate fair conformity with the data but unique and distinct correlations with CVC. Negative affectivity may determine the relationship of anhedonic depression and autonomic anxiety with CVC. Separating affective symptoms under the constructs of the tripartite models helps disentangle complex associations between co-occurring depression and anxiety with CVC.",
keywords = "Cardiac vagal control, Co-occurring depression and anxiety, Heart rate variability, The Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, Tripartite model",
author = "Chen, {Hsi Chung} and Yang, {Cheryl C H} and Kuo, {Terry B J} and Su, {Tung Ping} and Pesus Chou",
year = "2012",
month = "7",
day = "30",
doi = "10.1186/1471-244X-12-93",
language = "English",
volume = "12",
journal = "BMC Psychiatry",
issn = "1471-244X",
publisher = "BioMed Central",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Cardiac vagal control and theoretical models of co-occurring depression and anxiety

T2 - A cross-sectional psychophysiological study of community elderly

AU - Chen, Hsi Chung

AU - Yang, Cheryl C H

AU - Kuo, Terry B J

AU - Su, Tung Ping

AU - Chou, Pesus

PY - 2012/7/30

Y1 - 2012/7/30

N2 - Background: In order to elucidate the complex relationship between co-occurring depression and anxiety with cardiac autonomic function in the elderly, this study examined the correlation between cardiac vagal control (CVC) and pre-defined, theoretical factors from the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS).Methods: Three hundred fifty-four randomly selected Chinese male subjects aged ≥65 years and living in the community were enrolled. CVC was measured using a frequency-domain index of heart rate variability.Results: Confirmatory factor analysis showed that the flat tripartite model of HADS provided a modest advantage in model fit when compared with other theoretical factor solutions. In the flat tripartite model, there was a significant negative association between anhedonic depression and CVC. In contrast, autonomic anxiety showed a significant positive correlation with CVC. In the hierarchical tripartite model, negative affectivity was not directly associated with CVC; instead, it had positive and negative indirect effects on CVC via autonomic anxiety and anhedonic depression, respectively. As scores for negative affectivity increased, these specific indirect effects diminished.Conclusions: Among competing models of co-occurring depression and anxiety, constructs from tripartite models demonstrate fair conformity with the data but unique and distinct correlations with CVC. Negative affectivity may determine the relationship of anhedonic depression and autonomic anxiety with CVC. Separating affective symptoms under the constructs of the tripartite models helps disentangle complex associations between co-occurring depression and anxiety with CVC.

AB - Background: In order to elucidate the complex relationship between co-occurring depression and anxiety with cardiac autonomic function in the elderly, this study examined the correlation between cardiac vagal control (CVC) and pre-defined, theoretical factors from the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS).Methods: Three hundred fifty-four randomly selected Chinese male subjects aged ≥65 years and living in the community were enrolled. CVC was measured using a frequency-domain index of heart rate variability.Results: Confirmatory factor analysis showed that the flat tripartite model of HADS provided a modest advantage in model fit when compared with other theoretical factor solutions. In the flat tripartite model, there was a significant negative association between anhedonic depression and CVC. In contrast, autonomic anxiety showed a significant positive correlation with CVC. In the hierarchical tripartite model, negative affectivity was not directly associated with CVC; instead, it had positive and negative indirect effects on CVC via autonomic anxiety and anhedonic depression, respectively. As scores for negative affectivity increased, these specific indirect effects diminished.Conclusions: Among competing models of co-occurring depression and anxiety, constructs from tripartite models demonstrate fair conformity with the data but unique and distinct correlations with CVC. Negative affectivity may determine the relationship of anhedonic depression and autonomic anxiety with CVC. Separating affective symptoms under the constructs of the tripartite models helps disentangle complex associations between co-occurring depression and anxiety with CVC.

KW - Cardiac vagal control

KW - Co-occurring depression and anxiety

KW - Heart rate variability

KW - The Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale

KW - Tripartite model

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84864336273&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84864336273&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1186/1471-244X-12-93

DO - 10.1186/1471-244X-12-93

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:84864336273

VL - 12

JO - BMC Psychiatry

JF - BMC Psychiatry

SN - 1471-244X

M1 - 93

ER -