Capnography monitoring the hypoventilation during the induction of bronchoscopic sedation

A randomized controlled trial

Ting Yu Lin, Yueh Fu Fang, Shih Hao Huang, Tsai Yu Wang, Chih Hsi Kuo, Hau Tieng Wu, Han Pin Kuo, Yu Lun Lo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

We hypothesize that capnography could detect hypoventilation during induction of bronchoscopic sedation and starting bronchoscopy following hypoventilation, may decrease hypoxemia. Patients were randomized to: starting bronchoscopy when hypoventilation (hypopnea, two successive breaths of at least 50% reduction of the peak wave compared to baseline or apnea, no wave for 10 seconds) (Study group, n = 55), or when the Observer Assessment of Alertness and Sedation scale (OAAS) was less than 4 (Control group, n = 59). Propofol infusion was titrated to maintain stable vital signs and sedative levels. The hypoventilation during induction in the control group and the sedative outcome were recorded. The patient characteristics and procedures performed were similar. Hypoventilation was observed in 74.6% of the patients before achieving OAAS < 4 in the control group. Apnea occurred more than hypopnea (p < 0.0001). Hypoventilation preceded OAAS < 4 by 96.5 ± 88.1 seconds. In the study group, the induction time was shorter (p = 0.03) and subjects with any two events of hypoxemia during sedation, maintenance or recovery were less than the control group (1.8 vs. 18.6%, p < 0.01). Patient tolerance, wakefulness during sedation, and cooperation were similar in both groups. Significant hypoventilation occurred during the induction and start bronchoscopy following hypoventilation may decrease hypoxemia without compromising patient tolerance.

Original languageEnglish
Article number8685
JournalScientific Reports
Volume7
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 1 2017
Externally publishedYes

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Capnography
Hypoventilation
Randomized Controlled Trials
Bronchoscopy
Control Groups
Apnea
Hypnotics and Sedatives
Vital Signs
Wakefulness
Propofol
Maintenance

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General

Cite this

Capnography monitoring the hypoventilation during the induction of bronchoscopic sedation : A randomized controlled trial. / Lin, Ting Yu; Fang, Yueh Fu; Huang, Shih Hao; Wang, Tsai Yu; Kuo, Chih Hsi; Wu, Hau Tieng; Kuo, Han Pin; Lo, Yu Lun.

In: Scientific Reports, Vol. 7, No. 1, 8685, 01.12.2017.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lin, Ting Yu ; Fang, Yueh Fu ; Huang, Shih Hao ; Wang, Tsai Yu ; Kuo, Chih Hsi ; Wu, Hau Tieng ; Kuo, Han Pin ; Lo, Yu Lun. / Capnography monitoring the hypoventilation during the induction of bronchoscopic sedation : A randomized controlled trial. In: Scientific Reports. 2017 ; Vol. 7, No. 1.
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