Candidemia in cancer patients: Impact of early removal of non-tunneled central venous catheters on outcome

C. Y. Liu, L. J. Huang, W. S. Wang, T. L. Chen, C. C. Yen, M. H. Yang, L. T. Hsiao, C. Y. Liu, P. M. Chen, T. J. Chiou

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

46 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To explore the impact of retention of non-tunneled central venous catheters (CVCs) on survival in candidemic cancer patients, where CVCs are commonly used and essential. A second object was to determine whether early CVC removal would benefit a subset of cancer patients. Methods: We retrospectively evaluated 92 cancer patients who had a single, non-tunneled CVC in place. Patients were grouped according to CVC retention or removal; the later group was subdivided into early (CVC removed ≤72 h after candidemia onset) and late removal. A Cox regression model was used for determining risk factors of adverse outcome and Kaplan-Meier analyses for comparing in-hospital 3-30 day survival among subgroups. Results: Baseline characteristics were comparable between CVC retention (n = 20) or removal (n = 72) groups. CVC retention was a significant risk factor of poor outcome, independent of other significant prognostic host factors (hazard ratio 7.15, 95% confidence interval 3.51-14.53, p < 0.001). Patients of early CVC removal (n = 40) had significant better survival than those of late removal (n = 32) (p < 0.001). Conclusion: The results suggest that retention of CVCs has a negative impact on survival in candidemic cancer patients, and that early CVC removal should be considered in a subset of cancer patients with candidemia.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)154-160
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Infection
Volume58
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2009
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Cancer
  • Candidemia
  • Central venous catheter

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Microbiology (medical)
  • Infectious Diseases

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