Can optimal acid suppression prevent rebleeding in peptic ulcer patients with a non-bleeding visible vessel

A preliminary report of a randomized comparative study

Hwai Jeng Lin, Wen Ching Lo, Chin Lin Perng, Kun Wang, Fa Yauh Lee

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

21 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background/Aims: The hypothesis that profound acid suppression might prevent clot lysis and thus benefit patients with a non-bleeding visible vessel has not been confirmed. Omeprazole can suppress gastric acid remarkably and may be beneficial for patients with peptic ulcer bleeding. Methodology: Fifty-two patients with a non-bleeding visible vessel at the ulcer base were enrolled and randomized into four groups (N = 13 in each group). In the cimetidine group, the patients received cimetidine 300 mg i.v. bolus followed by 300 mg i.v. every 6 hr during hospitalization. In the heater probe thermocoagulation + cimetidine group, the patients received heater probe thermocoagulation and cimetidine 300 mg i.v. bolus followed by 300 mg i.v. every 6 h during hospitalization. In the omeprazole q.d. group, the patients received omeprazole 40 mg i.v. bolus followed by 40 mg i.v. daily for two days. In the omeprazole q 12 h group, the patients received omeprazole 40 mg i.v. bolus followed by 40 mg i.v., every 12 h for two days. A 24 hr intragastric pH was recorded for every case. Results: The mean 24 hr intragastric pH were higher in the omeprazole q.d. (mean. 5.8) and the omeprazole q 12 h groups (mean 6.4) than in the cimetidine (mean 4.3) and the heater probe thermocoagulation + cimetidine groups (mean 4.9) (p <0.05). Rebleeding occurred in 5, 2, 2 and 2 patients in the cimetidine, heater probe thermocoagulation + cimetidine, omeprazole q.d., and omeprazole q 12h groups, respectively (p > 0.05). Volume of blood transfusion and number of days in hospital were not statistically different among the four groups. Conclusions: Omeprazole can remarkably suppress gastric acid when it is compared to that of the H2 receptor blocker. Patients with a non-bleeding visible vessel using omeprazole do not exhibit a decrease in the rebleeding rate as compared with those patients using cimetidine.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1495-1499
Number of pages5
JournalHepato-Gastroenterology
Volume44
Issue number17
Publication statusPublished - 1997
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Omeprazole
Peptic Ulcer
Cimetidine
Acids
Electrocoagulation
Gastric Acid
Hospitalization
Histamine H2 Receptors
Blood Transfusion
Ulcer
Hemorrhage

Keywords

  • Acid suppression
  • Non-Bleeding
  • Rebleeding
  • Visible vessel

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Gastroenterology

Cite this

Can optimal acid suppression prevent rebleeding in peptic ulcer patients with a non-bleeding visible vessel : A preliminary report of a randomized comparative study. / Lin, Hwai Jeng; Lo, Wen Ching; Perng, Chin Lin; Wang, Kun; Lee, Fa Yauh.

In: Hepato-Gastroenterology, Vol. 44, No. 17, 1997, p. 1495-1499.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Background/Aims: The hypothesis that profound acid suppression might prevent clot lysis and thus benefit patients with a non-bleeding visible vessel has not been confirmed. Omeprazole can suppress gastric acid remarkably and may be beneficial for patients with peptic ulcer bleeding. Methodology: Fifty-two patients with a non-bleeding visible vessel at the ulcer base were enrolled and randomized into four groups (N = 13 in each group). In the cimetidine group, the patients received cimetidine 300 mg i.v. bolus followed by 300 mg i.v. every 6 hr during hospitalization. In the heater probe thermocoagulation + cimetidine group, the patients received heater probe thermocoagulation and cimetidine 300 mg i.v. bolus followed by 300 mg i.v. every 6 h during hospitalization. In the omeprazole q.d. group, the patients received omeprazole 40 mg i.v. bolus followed by 40 mg i.v. daily for two days. In the omeprazole q 12 h group, the patients received omeprazole 40 mg i.v. bolus followed by 40 mg i.v., every 12 h for two days. A 24 hr intragastric pH was recorded for every case. Results: The mean 24 hr intragastric pH were higher in the omeprazole q.d. (mean. 5.8) and the omeprazole q 12 h groups (mean 6.4) than in the cimetidine (mean 4.3) and the heater probe thermocoagulation + cimetidine groups (mean 4.9) (p <0.05). Rebleeding occurred in 5, 2, 2 and 2 patients in the cimetidine, heater probe thermocoagulation + cimetidine, omeprazole q.d., and omeprazole q 12h groups, respectively (p > 0.05). Volume of blood transfusion and number of days in hospital were not statistically different among the four groups. Conclusions: Omeprazole can remarkably suppress gastric acid when it is compared to that of the H2 receptor blocker. Patients with a non-bleeding visible vessel using omeprazole do not exhibit a decrease in the rebleeding rate as compared with those patients using cimetidine.",
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AU - Lo, Wen Ching

AU - Perng, Chin Lin

AU - Wang, Kun

AU - Lee, Fa Yauh

PY - 1997

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N2 - Background/Aims: The hypothesis that profound acid suppression might prevent clot lysis and thus benefit patients with a non-bleeding visible vessel has not been confirmed. Omeprazole can suppress gastric acid remarkably and may be beneficial for patients with peptic ulcer bleeding. Methodology: Fifty-two patients with a non-bleeding visible vessel at the ulcer base were enrolled and randomized into four groups (N = 13 in each group). In the cimetidine group, the patients received cimetidine 300 mg i.v. bolus followed by 300 mg i.v. every 6 hr during hospitalization. In the heater probe thermocoagulation + cimetidine group, the patients received heater probe thermocoagulation and cimetidine 300 mg i.v. bolus followed by 300 mg i.v. every 6 h during hospitalization. In the omeprazole q.d. group, the patients received omeprazole 40 mg i.v. bolus followed by 40 mg i.v. daily for two days. In the omeprazole q 12 h group, the patients received omeprazole 40 mg i.v. bolus followed by 40 mg i.v., every 12 h for two days. A 24 hr intragastric pH was recorded for every case. Results: The mean 24 hr intragastric pH were higher in the omeprazole q.d. (mean. 5.8) and the omeprazole q 12 h groups (mean 6.4) than in the cimetidine (mean 4.3) and the heater probe thermocoagulation + cimetidine groups (mean 4.9) (p <0.05). Rebleeding occurred in 5, 2, 2 and 2 patients in the cimetidine, heater probe thermocoagulation + cimetidine, omeprazole q.d., and omeprazole q 12h groups, respectively (p > 0.05). Volume of blood transfusion and number of days in hospital were not statistically different among the four groups. Conclusions: Omeprazole can remarkably suppress gastric acid when it is compared to that of the H2 receptor blocker. Patients with a non-bleeding visible vessel using omeprazole do not exhibit a decrease in the rebleeding rate as compared with those patients using cimetidine.

AB - Background/Aims: The hypothesis that profound acid suppression might prevent clot lysis and thus benefit patients with a non-bleeding visible vessel has not been confirmed. Omeprazole can suppress gastric acid remarkably and may be beneficial for patients with peptic ulcer bleeding. Methodology: Fifty-two patients with a non-bleeding visible vessel at the ulcer base were enrolled and randomized into four groups (N = 13 in each group). In the cimetidine group, the patients received cimetidine 300 mg i.v. bolus followed by 300 mg i.v. every 6 hr during hospitalization. In the heater probe thermocoagulation + cimetidine group, the patients received heater probe thermocoagulation and cimetidine 300 mg i.v. bolus followed by 300 mg i.v. every 6 h during hospitalization. In the omeprazole q.d. group, the patients received omeprazole 40 mg i.v. bolus followed by 40 mg i.v. daily for two days. In the omeprazole q 12 h group, the patients received omeprazole 40 mg i.v. bolus followed by 40 mg i.v., every 12 h for two days. A 24 hr intragastric pH was recorded for every case. Results: The mean 24 hr intragastric pH were higher in the omeprazole q.d. (mean. 5.8) and the omeprazole q 12 h groups (mean 6.4) than in the cimetidine (mean 4.3) and the heater probe thermocoagulation + cimetidine groups (mean 4.9) (p <0.05). Rebleeding occurred in 5, 2, 2 and 2 patients in the cimetidine, heater probe thermocoagulation + cimetidine, omeprazole q.d., and omeprazole q 12h groups, respectively (p > 0.05). Volume of blood transfusion and number of days in hospital were not statistically different among the four groups. Conclusions: Omeprazole can remarkably suppress gastric acid when it is compared to that of the H2 receptor blocker. Patients with a non-bleeding visible vessel using omeprazole do not exhibit a decrease in the rebleeding rate as compared with those patients using cimetidine.

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KW - Rebleeding

KW - Visible vessel

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