Calorie Restriction Supplemented with Fish Oil Ameliorates Abnormal Metabolic Status in Middle-Aged Obese Women: An Open-Label, Parallel-Arm, Controlled Trial

Fasty Arum Utami, Hsiu Chuan Lee, Chien-Tien Su, Shih-Yi Huang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objectives: This study investigated the effects of calorie restriction supplemented with fish oil (CRF) in middle-aged women with MetS. Design: An open-label, parallel-arm, controlled trial was conduct for 12 weeks. Participants: Seventy-five eligible participants were randomly assigned either calorie restriction (CR) or CRF. Both dietary intervention groups were further divided into two age groups: ≤45 and >45 years. Measurements: The changes in MetS severity, inflammatory status, iron status, and red blood cell fatty acid profile were evaluated. Results: Seventy-one participants completed the trial. Both dietary interventions significantly ameliorated MetS and improved the participants’ inflammatory status. CR significantly increased total iron binding capacity, whereas CRF increased hepcidin levels. Furthermore, CRF significantly increased the n-6/n-3 and arachidonic acid/docosahexaenoic acid ratios. CR and CRF improved the anthropometric and MetS characteristics of early-middle aged women, including body weight, blood glucose levels, triglyceride levels, as well as the scores for the homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance and quantitative insulin sensitivity cheque index. Conclusion: Our dietary interventions suggest that calorie restriction with fish oil (CRF) shows more effective amelioration on the status of PC and TIBC levels in older middle-aged women (>45 years) than in younger middle-aged women (45 years).
Original languageEnglish
JournalFood and Function
Publication statusPublished - Aug 2016

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middle-aged adults
Fish Oils
fish oils
insulin resistance
Insulin Resistance
Iron
iron
Hepcidins
Docosahexaenoic Acids
binding capacity
docosahexaenoic acid
arachidonic acid
Arachidonic Acid
blood glucose
Blood Glucose
homeostasis
Triglycerides
Homeostasis
erythrocytes
Fatty Acids

Cite this

@article{c59751ceac7741faa7012c0041965ddd,
title = "Calorie Restriction Supplemented with Fish Oil Ameliorates Abnormal Metabolic Status in Middle-Aged Obese Women: An Open-Label, Parallel-Arm, Controlled Trial",
abstract = "Objectives: This study investigated the effects of calorie restriction supplemented with fish oil (CRF) in middle-aged women with MetS. Design: An open-label, parallel-arm, controlled trial was conduct for 12 weeks. Participants: Seventy-five eligible participants were randomly assigned either calorie restriction (CR) or CRF. Both dietary intervention groups were further divided into two age groups: ≤45 and >45 years. Measurements: The changes in MetS severity, inflammatory status, iron status, and red blood cell fatty acid profile were evaluated. Results: Seventy-one participants completed the trial. Both dietary interventions significantly ameliorated MetS and improved the participants’ inflammatory status. CR significantly increased total iron binding capacity, whereas CRF increased hepcidin levels. Furthermore, CRF significantly increased the n-6/n-3 and arachidonic acid/docosahexaenoic acid ratios. CR and CRF improved the anthropometric and MetS characteristics of early-middle aged women, including body weight, blood glucose levels, triglyceride levels, as well as the scores for the homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance and quantitative insulin sensitivity cheque index. Conclusion: Our dietary interventions suggest that calorie restriction with fish oil (CRF) shows more effective amelioration on the status of PC and TIBC levels in older middle-aged women (>45 years) than in younger middle-aged women (45 years).",
author = "Utami, {Fasty Arum} and Lee, {Hsiu Chuan} and Chien-Tien Su and Shih-Yi Huang",
year = "2016",
month = "8",
language = "English",
journal = "Food and Function",
issn = "2042-6496",
publisher = "Royal Society of Chemistry",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Calorie Restriction Supplemented with Fish Oil Ameliorates Abnormal Metabolic Status in Middle-Aged Obese Women: An Open-Label, Parallel-Arm, Controlled Trial

AU - Utami, Fasty Arum

AU - Lee, Hsiu Chuan

AU - Su, Chien-Tien

AU - Huang, Shih-Yi

PY - 2016/8

Y1 - 2016/8

N2 - Objectives: This study investigated the effects of calorie restriction supplemented with fish oil (CRF) in middle-aged women with MetS. Design: An open-label, parallel-arm, controlled trial was conduct for 12 weeks. Participants: Seventy-five eligible participants were randomly assigned either calorie restriction (CR) or CRF. Both dietary intervention groups were further divided into two age groups: ≤45 and >45 years. Measurements: The changes in MetS severity, inflammatory status, iron status, and red blood cell fatty acid profile were evaluated. Results: Seventy-one participants completed the trial. Both dietary interventions significantly ameliorated MetS and improved the participants’ inflammatory status. CR significantly increased total iron binding capacity, whereas CRF increased hepcidin levels. Furthermore, CRF significantly increased the n-6/n-3 and arachidonic acid/docosahexaenoic acid ratios. CR and CRF improved the anthropometric and MetS characteristics of early-middle aged women, including body weight, blood glucose levels, triglyceride levels, as well as the scores for the homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance and quantitative insulin sensitivity cheque index. Conclusion: Our dietary interventions suggest that calorie restriction with fish oil (CRF) shows more effective amelioration on the status of PC and TIBC levels in older middle-aged women (>45 years) than in younger middle-aged women (45 years).

AB - Objectives: This study investigated the effects of calorie restriction supplemented with fish oil (CRF) in middle-aged women with MetS. Design: An open-label, parallel-arm, controlled trial was conduct for 12 weeks. Participants: Seventy-five eligible participants were randomly assigned either calorie restriction (CR) or CRF. Both dietary intervention groups were further divided into two age groups: ≤45 and >45 years. Measurements: The changes in MetS severity, inflammatory status, iron status, and red blood cell fatty acid profile were evaluated. Results: Seventy-one participants completed the trial. Both dietary interventions significantly ameliorated MetS and improved the participants’ inflammatory status. CR significantly increased total iron binding capacity, whereas CRF increased hepcidin levels. Furthermore, CRF significantly increased the n-6/n-3 and arachidonic acid/docosahexaenoic acid ratios. CR and CRF improved the anthropometric and MetS characteristics of early-middle aged women, including body weight, blood glucose levels, triglyceride levels, as well as the scores for the homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance and quantitative insulin sensitivity cheque index. Conclusion: Our dietary interventions suggest that calorie restriction with fish oil (CRF) shows more effective amelioration on the status of PC and TIBC levels in older middle-aged women (>45 years) than in younger middle-aged women (45 years).

UR - http://10.20944/preprints201608.0133.v1

M3 - Article

JO - Food and Function

JF - Food and Function

SN - 2042-6496

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