C-reactive protein concentration as a significant correlate for metabolic syndrome: A Chinese population-based study

Tsan Yang, Chi Hong Chu, Po Chien Hsieh, Chih Hsung Hsu, Yu Ching Chou, Shih Hsien Yang, Chyi-Huey Bai, San Lin You, Lee Ching Hwang, Tieh Chi Chung, Chien An Sun

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

21 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Increasing evidence suggests that chronic, low-grade inflammation may be a common soil involving the pathogenesis of metabolic syndrome (MetS) and cardiovascular disease. We examined the association between C-reactive protein (CRP) concentration, an extensively studied biomarker of low-grade inflammation, and the MetS in a representative sample of Chinese adults in Taiwan. We performed a cross-sectional analysis of data from 4234 subjects [mean (±SD) age, 47.1 (±18.2) years; 46.4 % males] who participated in a population-based survey on prevalences of hypertension, hyperglycemia, and hyperlipidemia in Taiwan. CRP levels were measured by the immunoturbidimetric CRP-latex high-sensitivity assay. The MetS was defined by an unified criteria set by several major organizations. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95 % confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated with logistic regression model. Overall, there were 938 subjects with MetS among 4,234 participants, resulting in a prevalence rate of 22.1 %. A significantly progressive increase in the prevalence of MetS across quartiles of CRP was observed (p for trend

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)351-359
Number of pages9
JournalEndocrine
Volume43
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2013

Fingerprint

C-Reactive Protein
Population
Taiwan
Logistic Models
Inflammation
Metabolic Diseases
Latex
Hyperlipidemias
Hyperglycemia
Cardiovascular Diseases
Soil
Cross-Sectional Studies
Biomarkers
Odds Ratio
Organizations
Confidence Intervals
Hypertension

Keywords

  • C-reactive protein
  • Chinese
  • Cross-sectional study
  • Inflammation
  • Metabolic syndrome

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Endocrinology
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism

Cite this

Yang, T., Chu, C. H., Hsieh, P. C., Hsu, C. H., Chou, Y. C., Yang, S. H., ... Sun, C. A. (2013). C-reactive protein concentration as a significant correlate for metabolic syndrome: A Chinese population-based study. Endocrine, 43(2), 351-359. https://doi.org/10.1007/s12020-012-9743-7

C-reactive protein concentration as a significant correlate for metabolic syndrome : A Chinese population-based study. / Yang, Tsan; Chu, Chi Hong; Hsieh, Po Chien; Hsu, Chih Hsung; Chou, Yu Ching; Yang, Shih Hsien; Bai, Chyi-Huey; You, San Lin; Hwang, Lee Ching; Chung, Tieh Chi; Sun, Chien An.

In: Endocrine, Vol. 43, No. 2, 04.2013, p. 351-359.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Yang, T, Chu, CH, Hsieh, PC, Hsu, CH, Chou, YC, Yang, SH, Bai, C-H, You, SL, Hwang, LC, Chung, TC & Sun, CA 2013, 'C-reactive protein concentration as a significant correlate for metabolic syndrome: A Chinese population-based study', Endocrine, vol. 43, no. 2, pp. 351-359. https://doi.org/10.1007/s12020-012-9743-7
Yang, Tsan ; Chu, Chi Hong ; Hsieh, Po Chien ; Hsu, Chih Hsung ; Chou, Yu Ching ; Yang, Shih Hsien ; Bai, Chyi-Huey ; You, San Lin ; Hwang, Lee Ching ; Chung, Tieh Chi ; Sun, Chien An. / C-reactive protein concentration as a significant correlate for metabolic syndrome : A Chinese population-based study. In: Endocrine. 2013 ; Vol. 43, No. 2. pp. 351-359.
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