Blood lipid peroxides and muscle damage increased following intensive resistance training of female weightlifters

Jen Fang Liu, Wei Yin Chang, Kuei Hui Chan, Wen Yee Tsai, Chen Li Lin, Mei Chieh Hsu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

45 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The aim of this study was to examine changes in muscle cell injury and antioxidant capacity of weightlifters following a 1-week intensive resistance-training regimen. Thirty-six female subjects participated in this study, and their ages ranged from 18 to 25 years. The sample group included 19 elite weightlifters with more than 3 years of weightlifting training experience, while the control group comprised 17 non-athletic individuals. Compared with non-athletes, weightlifters had significantly lower glutathione peroxidase activity and plasma vitamin C concentrations. Weightlifters also had significantly higher malondialdehyde + 4-hydroxy 2-(E)-nonenal (MDA+4-HNE) and thiobarbituric acid-reactive substance (TBARS) levels and creatine kinase (CK) activity. For weightlifters, the plasma vitamin E level and the activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD) decreased, and CK activity increased significantly (P <0.05) after a 1-week intensive resistance-training regimen. Both the TBARS levels and CK activity returned to values of pre-intensive training after a 2-day rest. The MDA+4-HNE level strongly correlated with CK activity in weightlifters (P <0.05). In conclusion, both long-term exercise training and 1 week of intensive resistance training resulted in increased oxidative stress and cell injury in female weightlifters. Furthermore, proper rest after intensive training was found to be important for recovery.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)255-261
Number of pages7
JournalAnnals of the New York Academy of Sciences
Volume1042
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2005

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Resistance Training
Lipid Peroxides
Creatine Kinase
Muscle
Blood
Muscles
Thiobarbituric Acid Reactive Substances
Malondialdehyde
Plasmas
Oxidative stress
Wounds and Injuries
Glutathione Peroxidase
Vitamin E
Muscle Cells
Ascorbic Acid
Superoxide Dismutase
Oxidative Stress
Antioxidants
Cells
Exercise

Keywords

  • Cellular damage
  • Lipid peroxidation
  • Resistance training
  • Weightlifters

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • History and Philosophy of Science

Cite this

Blood lipid peroxides and muscle damage increased following intensive resistance training of female weightlifters. / Liu, Jen Fang; Chang, Wei Yin; Chan, Kuei Hui; Tsai, Wen Yee; Lin, Chen Li; Hsu, Mei Chieh.

In: Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, Vol. 1042, 2005, p. 255-261.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Liu, Jen Fang ; Chang, Wei Yin ; Chan, Kuei Hui ; Tsai, Wen Yee ; Lin, Chen Li ; Hsu, Mei Chieh. / Blood lipid peroxides and muscle damage increased following intensive resistance training of female weightlifters. In: Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences. 2005 ; Vol. 1042. pp. 255-261.
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