Bladder wall thickness on ultrasonographic cystourethrography: Affecting factors and their implications

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Abstract

Objective. To explore factors affecting bladder wall thickness on ultrasonographic cystourethrography in female patients with lower urinary tract symptoms. Methods. The records of 492 female patients with lower urinary tract symptoms who had undergone a urodynamic study and ultrasonography of the lower urinary tract and who had normal urinalysis findings, negative urine culture results, or both were identified from our urogynecologic database. These included 248 patients with urodynamic stress incontinence, 38 with detrusor overactivity, 39 with mixed incontinence, 35 with a hypersensitive bladder, 42 with voiding difficulty, and 90 with normal urodynamic findings. Results. Age, resting bladder neck angle, urethral mobility, and maximum urethral closure pressure were significantly associated with bladder wall thickness at the trigone and dome. Bladder wall thickness at the trigone was correlated with that at the dome (P <.0001). Bladder wall thickness at the trigone was positively correlated with pressure transmission ratios in the first and second quarters of the urethra (P <.0001; P = .002, respectively), whereas that at the dome was positively correlated with intravesical pressure at maximum flow and with detrusor opening pressure (P = .027; P = .046, respectively). Age and intravesical pressure at maximum flow were independently associated with bladder wall thickness at the trigone and dome (P =.007; P =.028), respectively. A thickened bladder wall was a common finding in female lower urinary tract symptoms, except in the patients with a hypersensitive bladder. Conclusions. Demographic, anatomic, and urodynamic factors may affect the bladder wall thickness at the trigone, dome, or both.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)777-782
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Ultrasound in Medicine
Volume22
Issue number8
Publication statusPublished - Aug 1 2003
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

bladder
Urinary Bladder
domes
Urodynamics
Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms
Pressure
urinalysis
Urinalysis
urine
Urethra
Urinary Tract
closures
Ultrasonography
Demography
Urine
Databases

Keywords

  • Bladder wall thickness
  • Lower urinary tract symptoms
  • Urodynamics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
  • Acoustics and Ultrasonics
  • Radiological and Ultrasound Technology

Cite this

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title = "Bladder wall thickness on ultrasonographic cystourethrography: Affecting factors and their implications",
abstract = "Objective. To explore factors affecting bladder wall thickness on ultrasonographic cystourethrography in female patients with lower urinary tract symptoms. Methods. The records of 492 female patients with lower urinary tract symptoms who had undergone a urodynamic study and ultrasonography of the lower urinary tract and who had normal urinalysis findings, negative urine culture results, or both were identified from our urogynecologic database. These included 248 patients with urodynamic stress incontinence, 38 with detrusor overactivity, 39 with mixed incontinence, 35 with a hypersensitive bladder, 42 with voiding difficulty, and 90 with normal urodynamic findings. Results. Age, resting bladder neck angle, urethral mobility, and maximum urethral closure pressure were significantly associated with bladder wall thickness at the trigone and dome. Bladder wall thickness at the trigone was correlated with that at the dome (P <.0001). Bladder wall thickness at the trigone was positively correlated with pressure transmission ratios in the first and second quarters of the urethra (P <.0001; P = .002, respectively), whereas that at the dome was positively correlated with intravesical pressure at maximum flow and with detrusor opening pressure (P = .027; P = .046, respectively). Age and intravesical pressure at maximum flow were independently associated with bladder wall thickness at the trigone and dome (P =.007; P =.028), respectively. A thickened bladder wall was a common finding in female lower urinary tract symptoms, except in the patients with a hypersensitive bladder. Conclusions. Demographic, anatomic, and urodynamic factors may affect the bladder wall thickness at the trigone, dome, or both.",
keywords = "Bladder wall thickness, Lower urinary tract symptoms, Urodynamics",
author = "Yang, {Jenn Ming} and Huang, {Wen Chen}",
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T1 - Bladder wall thickness on ultrasonographic cystourethrography

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AU - Yang, Jenn Ming

AU - Huang, Wen Chen

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N2 - Objective. To explore factors affecting bladder wall thickness on ultrasonographic cystourethrography in female patients with lower urinary tract symptoms. Methods. The records of 492 female patients with lower urinary tract symptoms who had undergone a urodynamic study and ultrasonography of the lower urinary tract and who had normal urinalysis findings, negative urine culture results, or both were identified from our urogynecologic database. These included 248 patients with urodynamic stress incontinence, 38 with detrusor overactivity, 39 with mixed incontinence, 35 with a hypersensitive bladder, 42 with voiding difficulty, and 90 with normal urodynamic findings. Results. Age, resting bladder neck angle, urethral mobility, and maximum urethral closure pressure were significantly associated with bladder wall thickness at the trigone and dome. Bladder wall thickness at the trigone was correlated with that at the dome (P <.0001). Bladder wall thickness at the trigone was positively correlated with pressure transmission ratios in the first and second quarters of the urethra (P <.0001; P = .002, respectively), whereas that at the dome was positively correlated with intravesical pressure at maximum flow and with detrusor opening pressure (P = .027; P = .046, respectively). Age and intravesical pressure at maximum flow were independently associated with bladder wall thickness at the trigone and dome (P =.007; P =.028), respectively. A thickened bladder wall was a common finding in female lower urinary tract symptoms, except in the patients with a hypersensitive bladder. Conclusions. Demographic, anatomic, and urodynamic factors may affect the bladder wall thickness at the trigone, dome, or both.

AB - Objective. To explore factors affecting bladder wall thickness on ultrasonographic cystourethrography in female patients with lower urinary tract symptoms. Methods. The records of 492 female patients with lower urinary tract symptoms who had undergone a urodynamic study and ultrasonography of the lower urinary tract and who had normal urinalysis findings, negative urine culture results, or both were identified from our urogynecologic database. These included 248 patients with urodynamic stress incontinence, 38 with detrusor overactivity, 39 with mixed incontinence, 35 with a hypersensitive bladder, 42 with voiding difficulty, and 90 with normal urodynamic findings. Results. Age, resting bladder neck angle, urethral mobility, and maximum urethral closure pressure were significantly associated with bladder wall thickness at the trigone and dome. Bladder wall thickness at the trigone was correlated with that at the dome (P <.0001). Bladder wall thickness at the trigone was positively correlated with pressure transmission ratios in the first and second quarters of the urethra (P <.0001; P = .002, respectively), whereas that at the dome was positively correlated with intravesical pressure at maximum flow and with detrusor opening pressure (P = .027; P = .046, respectively). Age and intravesical pressure at maximum flow were independently associated with bladder wall thickness at the trigone and dome (P =.007; P =.028), respectively. A thickened bladder wall was a common finding in female lower urinary tract symptoms, except in the patients with a hypersensitive bladder. Conclusions. Demographic, anatomic, and urodynamic factors may affect the bladder wall thickness at the trigone, dome, or both.

KW - Bladder wall thickness

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