Abstract

Purpose: Sore throat is a common postoperative complaint. The etiology of postoperative sore throat (POST) is considered the result of damage to airway mucosa after insertion of a laryngeal mask airway device or endotracheal tube. This paper proposes benzydamine hydrochloride (BH), a topical nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) with additional analgesic and local anesthetic properties, for POST prevention. Source: We systematically searched PubMed, EMBASE™, Cochrane, and other relevant databases for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that investigated the outcome of topical application of BH vs non-application in patients undergoing general anesthesia. Using a random effects model, meta-analyses were conducted to assess the relative risks of the incidence of POST within 24 hr following the surgical procedure. The secondary outcomes included postoperative nausea and vomiting, dry mouth, coughing, and local irritation. Principal findings: We reviewed five trials that included 824 patients in total. Our results indicated that the incidence of POST was significantly reduced in the BH group, with risk ratios (RRs) of 0.37 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.20 to 0.68) at zero to one hour, 0.39 (95% CI: 0.27 to 0.57) at one to two hours, 0.42 (95% CI: 0.22 to 0.81) at four to six hours, 0.29 (95% CI: 0.10 to 0.88) at six to 12 hr, and 0.32 (95% CI: 0.18 to 0.56) at 12 to 24 hr, compared with the control groups. Patients reported local irritation, but no major BH-related complications were observed. Conclusion: Our results indicate that the incidence of POST can be significantly reduced by prophylactic BH topical application to the oral cavity or airway devices. Further RCTs are required to overcome the limitations of heterogeneity and to determine the optimal dosage and application of BH for managing POST.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)220-228
Number of pages9
JournalCanadian Journal of Anesthesia
Volume61
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014

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Benzydamine
Pharyngitis
Meta-Analysis
Randomized Controlled Trials
Confidence Intervals
Mouth
Incidence
Laryngeal Masks
Equipment and Supplies
Postoperative Nausea and Vomiting
Local Anesthetics
PubMed
General Anesthesia
Analgesics
Mucous Membrane
Anti-Inflammatory Agents
Odds Ratio
Databases
Control Groups

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine

Cite this

@article{829664eedcb54e159ad99688939424c8,
title = "Benzydamine hydrochloride on postoperative sore throat: A meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials",
abstract = "Purpose: Sore throat is a common postoperative complaint. The etiology of postoperative sore throat (POST) is considered the result of damage to airway mucosa after insertion of a laryngeal mask airway device or endotracheal tube. This paper proposes benzydamine hydrochloride (BH), a topical nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) with additional analgesic and local anesthetic properties, for POST prevention. Source: We systematically searched PubMed, EMBASE™, Cochrane, and other relevant databases for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that investigated the outcome of topical application of BH vs non-application in patients undergoing general anesthesia. Using a random effects model, meta-analyses were conducted to assess the relative risks of the incidence of POST within 24 hr following the surgical procedure. The secondary outcomes included postoperative nausea and vomiting, dry mouth, coughing, and local irritation. Principal findings: We reviewed five trials that included 824 patients in total. Our results indicated that the incidence of POST was significantly reduced in the BH group, with risk ratios (RRs) of 0.37 (95{\%} confidence interval [CI]: 0.20 to 0.68) at zero to one hour, 0.39 (95{\%} CI: 0.27 to 0.57) at one to two hours, 0.42 (95{\%} CI: 0.22 to 0.81) at four to six hours, 0.29 (95{\%} CI: 0.10 to 0.88) at six to 12 hr, and 0.32 (95{\%} CI: 0.18 to 0.56) at 12 to 24 hr, compared with the control groups. Patients reported local irritation, but no major BH-related complications were observed. Conclusion: Our results indicate that the incidence of POST can be significantly reduced by prophylactic BH topical application to the oral cavity or airway devices. Further RCTs are required to overcome the limitations of heterogeneity and to determine the optimal dosage and application of BH for managing POST.",
author = "Chien-Yu Chen and Kuo, {Chien Ju} and Yuan-Wen Lee and Fai Lam and Ka-Wai Tam",
year = "2014",
doi = "10.1007/s12630-013-0080-y",
language = "English",
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pages = "220--228",
journal = "Canadian Journal of Anaesthesia",
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T1 - Benzydamine hydrochloride on postoperative sore throat

T2 - A meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

AU - Chen, Chien-Yu

AU - Kuo, Chien Ju

AU - Lee, Yuan-Wen

AU - Lam, Fai

AU - Tam, Ka-Wai

PY - 2014

Y1 - 2014

N2 - Purpose: Sore throat is a common postoperative complaint. The etiology of postoperative sore throat (POST) is considered the result of damage to airway mucosa after insertion of a laryngeal mask airway device or endotracheal tube. This paper proposes benzydamine hydrochloride (BH), a topical nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) with additional analgesic and local anesthetic properties, for POST prevention. Source: We systematically searched PubMed, EMBASE™, Cochrane, and other relevant databases for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that investigated the outcome of topical application of BH vs non-application in patients undergoing general anesthesia. Using a random effects model, meta-analyses were conducted to assess the relative risks of the incidence of POST within 24 hr following the surgical procedure. The secondary outcomes included postoperative nausea and vomiting, dry mouth, coughing, and local irritation. Principal findings: We reviewed five trials that included 824 patients in total. Our results indicated that the incidence of POST was significantly reduced in the BH group, with risk ratios (RRs) of 0.37 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.20 to 0.68) at zero to one hour, 0.39 (95% CI: 0.27 to 0.57) at one to two hours, 0.42 (95% CI: 0.22 to 0.81) at four to six hours, 0.29 (95% CI: 0.10 to 0.88) at six to 12 hr, and 0.32 (95% CI: 0.18 to 0.56) at 12 to 24 hr, compared with the control groups. Patients reported local irritation, but no major BH-related complications were observed. Conclusion: Our results indicate that the incidence of POST can be significantly reduced by prophylactic BH topical application to the oral cavity or airway devices. Further RCTs are required to overcome the limitations of heterogeneity and to determine the optimal dosage and application of BH for managing POST.

AB - Purpose: Sore throat is a common postoperative complaint. The etiology of postoperative sore throat (POST) is considered the result of damage to airway mucosa after insertion of a laryngeal mask airway device or endotracheal tube. This paper proposes benzydamine hydrochloride (BH), a topical nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) with additional analgesic and local anesthetic properties, for POST prevention. Source: We systematically searched PubMed, EMBASE™, Cochrane, and other relevant databases for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that investigated the outcome of topical application of BH vs non-application in patients undergoing general anesthesia. Using a random effects model, meta-analyses were conducted to assess the relative risks of the incidence of POST within 24 hr following the surgical procedure. The secondary outcomes included postoperative nausea and vomiting, dry mouth, coughing, and local irritation. Principal findings: We reviewed five trials that included 824 patients in total. Our results indicated that the incidence of POST was significantly reduced in the BH group, with risk ratios (RRs) of 0.37 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.20 to 0.68) at zero to one hour, 0.39 (95% CI: 0.27 to 0.57) at one to two hours, 0.42 (95% CI: 0.22 to 0.81) at four to six hours, 0.29 (95% CI: 0.10 to 0.88) at six to 12 hr, and 0.32 (95% CI: 0.18 to 0.56) at 12 to 24 hr, compared with the control groups. Patients reported local irritation, but no major BH-related complications were observed. Conclusion: Our results indicate that the incidence of POST can be significantly reduced by prophylactic BH topical application to the oral cavity or airway devices. Further RCTs are required to overcome the limitations of heterogeneity and to determine the optimal dosage and application of BH for managing POST.

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JO - Canadian Journal of Anaesthesia

JF - Canadian Journal of Anaesthesia

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