Baseline forced expiratory volume in the first second as an independent predictor of development of the metabolic syndrome

Fone Ching Hsiao, Chung Ze Wu, Sheng Chiang Su, Ming Tsung Sun, Chang Hsun Hsieh, Yi Jen Hung, Chih Tsueng He, Dee Pei

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12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A growing body of evidence strongly supports associations between reduced lung function and insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes mellitus, and cardiovascular disease. The present study was undertaken to explore the possibility that reduced lung function is an independent predictor of development of the metabolic syndrome (MetS) and to investigate potential links between reduced lung function and the MetS. A prospective cohort study of reduced lung function as a predictor of subsequent MetS was conducted using 2-year follow-up data for 450 middle-aged adults lacking the MetS at baseline. Data were obtained from the Taipei MJ Health Screening Centers in Taiwan. The MetS was defined according to the modified Adult Treatment Panel III criteria. Over 2 years of follow-up, 26 of the 450 subjects (5.78%) without the MetS at baseline subsequently developed the syndrome. In multiple logistic regression analysis with adjustments for age, sex, body mass index, cigarette smoking, alcohol consumption, and physical activities, reduced forced expiratory volume in the first second (FEV1) at baseline remained a predictor of subsequent MetS (relative risk of 4.644, P = .036 for the third [2.88 L] tertile). In Pearson and partial correlation analyses, white blood cell counts and C-reactive protein concentrations were both found to be significantly and negatively correlated with FEV1. Lower FEV1 is concluded to serve as an independent predictor of the MetS. Low-grade systemic inflammation is the possible link between reduced lung function and the MetS.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)848-853
Number of pages6
JournalMetabolism: Clinical and Experimental
Volume59
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2010

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ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Endocrinology
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism

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