Baseline faecal occult blood concentration as a predictor of incident colorectal neoplasia: Longitudinal follow-up of a Taiwanese population-based colorectal cancer screening cohort

Li Sheng Chen, Amy Ming Fang Yen, Sherry Yueh Hsia Chiu, Chao Sheng Liao, Hsiu Hsi Chen

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64 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Despite widespread use of the immunochemical faecal occult blood test (iFOBT), little is known about the subsequent risk of developing colorectal neoplasia for participants with negative iFOBT results. We investigated whether the concentration of faecal haemoglobin at the first screen is predictive of the subsequent incidence of colorectal neoplasia in those with a negative screening result. Methods: Between 2001 and 2007, we did a prospective cohort study within the Keelung community-based iFOBT screening programme for residents aged 40-69 years, using a cutoff faecal haemoglobin concentration of 100 ng/mL to classify attendees as negative and positive groups for further clinical investigations. 44 324 participants with negative findings and 1668 with a positive result at the first screen (854 non-referrals who refused colonoscopy and 814 with a false-positive result as assessed by colonoscopy) were followed up to ascertain cases of colorectal neoplasia. We investigated the association between baseline faecal haemoglobin concentration and risk of incident colorectal neoplasia, after adjusting for possible confounders. Findings: Median follow-up was 4·39 years (IQR 2·53-6·12) for all 45 992 participants, during which the incidence of colorectal neoplasia increased from 1·74 per 1000 person-years for those with baseline faecal haemoglobin concentration 1-19 ng/mL, to 7·08 per 1000 person-years for those with a baseline concentration of 80-99 ng/mL. The adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) increased from 1·43 (95% CI 1·08-1·88) for baseline faecal haemoglobin concentration of 20-39 ng/mL, to 3·41 (2·02-5·75) for a baseline concentration of 80-99 ng/mL (trend test p

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)551-558
Number of pages8
JournalThe Lancet Oncology
Volume12
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2011

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology

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