Australians living with and managing hepatitis C

Anthony P. O'Brien, Wendy M. Cross, Peter Higgs, Ian Munro, Melissa J. Bloomer, Kuei Ro Chou

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This paper discusses the psychosocial impact of being diagnosed with hepatitis C virus (HCV). The paper clarifies some of the key misconceptions about the virus, especially the impact HCV has on people who have been recently diagnosed. An individual's reaction to the HCV diagnosis and the subsequent lifestyle challenges to maintain health, well-being, family, and social networks are discussed, particularly the issues surrounding mental health in respect to a recent chronic illness diagnosis and how to manage the trajectory of the illness in the community and individually. HCV disclosure and its effect on intimacy are also detailed. For people living with both a diagnosed mental illness and HCV, managing the illness can be complicated. Not only are these individuals concerned about their mental illness, its treatment, and the social stigma and discrimination associated with it, they also may be alarmed over their future physical health. The paper is preliminary to research using the psychotherapeutic approach of Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT) in groups of persons with a dual diagnosis of mental illness and HCV.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)520-524
Number of pages5
JournalIssues in Mental Health Nursing
Volume31
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2010

Fingerprint

Hepatitis C
Hepacivirus
Social Discrimination
Social Stigma
Dual (Psychiatry) Diagnosis
Health
Disclosure
Cognitive Therapy
Social Support
Life Style
Mental Health
Chronic Disease
Viruses
Research

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Phychiatric Mental Health

Cite this

O'Brien, A. P., Cross, W. M., Higgs, P., Munro, I., Bloomer, M. J., & Chou, K. R. (2010). Australians living with and managing hepatitis C. Issues in Mental Health Nursing, 31(8), 520-524. https://doi.org/10.3109/01612841003629532

Australians living with and managing hepatitis C. / O'Brien, Anthony P.; Cross, Wendy M.; Higgs, Peter; Munro, Ian; Bloomer, Melissa J.; Chou, Kuei Ro.

In: Issues in Mental Health Nursing, Vol. 31, No. 8, 07.2010, p. 520-524.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

O'Brien, AP, Cross, WM, Higgs, P, Munro, I, Bloomer, MJ & Chou, KR 2010, 'Australians living with and managing hepatitis C', Issues in Mental Health Nursing, vol. 31, no. 8, pp. 520-524. https://doi.org/10.3109/01612841003629532
O'Brien, Anthony P. ; Cross, Wendy M. ; Higgs, Peter ; Munro, Ian ; Bloomer, Melissa J. ; Chou, Kuei Ro. / Australians living with and managing hepatitis C. In: Issues in Mental Health Nursing. 2010 ; Vol. 31, No. 8. pp. 520-524.
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