Associations of the pre-pregnancy body mass index and gestational weight gain with pregnancy outcomes in Taiwanese women

I. Hsien Tsai, Chih Ping Chen, Fang Ju Sun, Chia Hsun Wu, Sung Ling Yeh

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

40 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Pre-pregnancy weight and gestational weight gain (GWG) are important factors in both maternal and infant outcomes. Little information is available in relation to different levels of pre-pregnancy body mass index (BMI) and body weight gain on obstetric outcomes in Taiwan. This study investigated the associations between pregnancy complications with pre-pregnant BMI and GWG, in Taiwanese women. Methods: Data were extracted from a delivery room information bank on all women delivering singleton babies in a medical center. Eight hundred and sixty pregnant women were included. The collected variables included basic information, GWG, and pregnancy and neonatal outcomes. Pregnant women were categorized according to their pre-pregnant BMI and GWG to evaluate the impacts of pre-pregnant BMI and maternal weight gain on the risk of pregnancy complications. Univariate and multivariable logistic regression analyses were performed, and odds ratios were calculated. Results: Pre-pregnancy BMI=24 kg/m2 increased the risks of gestational diabetes mellitus, preeclampsia, and preterm labor. Preeclampsia and Cesarean delivery were positively associated with high weight gains (>18 kg), whereas a low birth weight and preterm labor were strongly associated with low weight gains (14 kg in women who were underweight and normal weight before pregnancy. Conclusion: An appropriate maternal BMI (18.5-24 kg/m2) at conception followed by a suitable gestational weight gain (10-14 kg) has substantial impact on the overall health of pregnant women and would lead to better obstetric management for Taiwanese women.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)82-87
Number of pages6
JournalAsia Pacific Journal of Clinical Nutrition
Volume21
Issue number1
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2012

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Pregnancy Outcome
Weight Gain
Body Mass Index
Pregnancy
Pregnant Women
Pregnancy Complications
Premature Obstetric Labor
Mothers
Pre-Eclampsia
Obstetrics
Delivery Rooms
Weights and Measures
Gestational Diabetes
Thinness
Low Birth Weight Infant
Taiwan
Logistic Models
Odds Ratio
Body Weight
Regression Analysis

Keywords

  • Body mass index (BMI)
  • Gestational weight gain (GWG)
  • Low birth weight
  • Pre-pregnancy weight
  • Pregnancy outcomes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

Cite this

Associations of the pre-pregnancy body mass index and gestational weight gain with pregnancy outcomes in Taiwanese women. / Tsai, I. Hsien; Chen, Chih Ping; Sun, Fang Ju; Wu, Chia Hsun; Yeh, Sung Ling.

In: Asia Pacific Journal of Clinical Nutrition, Vol. 21, No. 1, 03.2012, p. 82-87.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Tsai, I. Hsien ; Chen, Chih Ping ; Sun, Fang Ju ; Wu, Chia Hsun ; Yeh, Sung Ling. / Associations of the pre-pregnancy body mass index and gestational weight gain with pregnancy outcomes in Taiwanese women. In: Asia Pacific Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 2012 ; Vol. 21, No. 1. pp. 82-87.
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