Associations of overnight changes in body composition with positional obstructive sleep apnea

Nguyen Thanh Tung, Shang Yang Lin, Hoang Ba Dung, Tran Phan Chung Thuy, Yi Chun Kuan, Cheng Yu Tsai, Chen Chen Lo, Kang Lo, Wen Te Liu, Hsiao Chi Chuang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Purpose: Body composition is considered to be associated with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) severity. This cross-sectional study aimed to examine associations of overnight body composition changes with positional OSA. Methods: The body composition of patients diagnosed with non-positional and positional OSA was measured before and after overnight polysomnography. Odds ratios (ORs) of outcome variables between the case (positional OSA) and reference (non-positional OSA) groups were examined for associations with sleep-related parameters and with changes in body composition by a logistic regression analysis. Results: Among 1584 patients with OSA, we used 1056 patients with non-positional OSA as the reference group. We found that a 1-unit increase in overnight changes of total fat percentage and total fat mass were associated with 1.076-fold increased OR (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.014, 1.142) and 1.096-fold increased OR (95% CI: 1.010, 1.189) of positional OSA, respectively (all p < 0.05). Additionally, a 1-unit increase in overnight changes of lower limb fat percentage and upper limb fat mass were associated with 1.043-fold increased OR (95% CI: 1.004, 1.084) and 2.638-fold increased OR (95% CI: 1.313, 5.302) of positional OSA, respectively (all p < 0.05). We observed that a 1-unit increase in overnight changes of trunk fat percentage and trunk fat mass were associated with 1.056-fold increased OR (95% CI: 1.008, 1.106) and 1.150-fold increased OR (95% CI: 1.016, 1.301) of positional OSA, respectively (all p < 0.05). Conclusion: Our findings indicated that nocturnal changes in the body’s composition, especially total fat mass, total fat percentage, lower limb fat percentage, upper limb fat mass, trunk fat percentage, and trunk fat mass, may be associated with increased odds ratio of positional OSA compared with non-positional OSA.

Original languageEnglish
JournalSleep and Breathing
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 2022

Keywords

  • Apnea–hypopnea index (AHI)
  • Arousal
  • Body fluid
  • Fat distribution
  • Muscle distribution
  • Upper airway

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Otorhinolaryngology
  • Clinical Neurology

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