Association of blood heavy metals with developmental delays and health status in children

Yu Mei Hsueh, Chih Ying Lee, Ssu Ning Chien, Wei Jen Chen, Horng Sheng Shiue, Shiau Rung Huang, Ming I. Lin, Shu Chi Mu, Ru Lan Hsieh

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The aim of this study was to evaluate the association of blood lead, mercury, and cadmium concentrations with developmental delays and to explore the association of these concentrations with the health status of children. This study recruited 89 children with developmental delays and 89 age-and sex-matched children with typical development. Their health status was evaluated using the Pediatric Quality of Life (PedsQL) Inventory for health-related quality of life (HRQOL) and the Pediatric Outcomes Data Collection Instrument for function. Family function was also evaluated. Blood lead, mercury, and cadmium concentrations were measured using inductively coupled mass spectrometry. The children with developmental delays had a considerably poorer HRQOL, lower functional performance and family function, and a higher blood lead concentration than those with typical development. The blood lead concentration had a significantly positive association with developmental delays [odds ratio (OR) = 1.54, p < 0.01] in a dose-response manner, and it negatively correlated with PedsQL scores (regression coefficient:-0. 47 to-0.53, p < 0.05) in all the children studied. The higher blood cadmium concentration showed a significantly positive association with developmental delays (OR = 2.24, for >1.0 μg/L vs. <0.6 μg/L, p < 0.05). The blood mercury concentration was not associated with developmental delays and health status.

Original languageEnglish
Article number43608
JournalScientific Reports
Volume7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2 2017

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Heavy Metals
Health Status
Mercury
Quality of Life
Cadmium
Pediatrics
Mass Spectrometry
Odds Ratio
Equipment and Supplies
Lead

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General

Cite this

Association of blood heavy metals with developmental delays and health status in children. / Hsueh, Yu Mei; Lee, Chih Ying; Chien, Ssu Ning; Chen, Wei Jen; Shiue, Horng Sheng; Huang, Shiau Rung; Lin, Ming I.; Mu, Shu Chi; Hsieh, Ru Lan.

In: Scientific Reports, Vol. 7, 43608, 02.03.2017.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hsueh, Yu Mei ; Lee, Chih Ying ; Chien, Ssu Ning ; Chen, Wei Jen ; Shiue, Horng Sheng ; Huang, Shiau Rung ; Lin, Ming I. ; Mu, Shu Chi ; Hsieh, Ru Lan. / Association of blood heavy metals with developmental delays and health status in children. In: Scientific Reports. 2017 ; Vol. 7.
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