Association of bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis with urinary calculus

A nationwide population-based study

Joseph Keller, Yi Kuang Chen, Herng Ching Lin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Introduction and hypothesis: Although one prior study reported an association between bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis (BPS/IC) and urinary calculi (UC), no population-based study to date has been conducted to explore this relationship. Therefore, using a population-based data set in Taiwan, this study set out to investigate the association between BPS/IC and a prior diagnosis of UC. Methods: This study included 9,269 cases who had received their first-time diagnosis of BPS/IC between 2006 and 2007 and 46,345 randomly selected controls. We used conditional logistic regression analysis to compute the odds ratio (OR) and its corresponding 95 % confidence interval (CI) for having been previously diagnosed with UC between cases and controls. Results: There was a significant difference in the prevalence of prior UC between cases and controls (8.1 vs 4.3 %, p <0.001). Conditional logistic regression analysis revealed that cases were more likely to have been previously diagnosed with UC than controls (OR = 1.70; 95 % CI = 1.56-1.84) after adjusting for chronic pelvic pain, irritable bowel syndrome, fibromyalgia, chronic fatigue syndrome, depression, panic disorder, migraine, sicca syndrome, allergy, endometriosis, and asthma. BPS/IC was found to be significantly associated with prior UC regardless of stone location; the adjusted ORs of kidney calculus, ureter calculus, bladder calculus, and unspecified calculus when compared to controls were 1.58 (95 % CI = 1.38-1.81), 1.73 (95 % CI = 1.45-2.05), 3.80 (95 % CI = 2.18-6.62), and 1.83 (95 % CI = 1.59-2.11), respectively. Conclusions: This work generates the hypothesis that UC may be associated with BPS/IC.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)565-571
Number of pages7
JournalInternational Urogynecology Journal and Pelvic Floor Dysfunction
Volume24
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2013

Fingerprint

Interstitial Cystitis
Urinary Calculi
Urinary Bladder
Pain
Confidence Intervals
Population
Calculi
Logistic Models
Odds Ratio
Regression Analysis
Urinary Bladder Calculi
Chronic Fatigue Syndrome
Kidney Calculi
Pelvic Pain
Irritable Bowel Syndrome
Panic Disorder
Sjogren's Syndrome
Endometriosis
Ureter
Migraine Disorders

Keywords

  • Bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis
  • BPS/IC
  • Keyword: Interstitial cystitis
  • Urinary calculus

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Urology
  • Obstetrics and Gynaecology

Cite this

@article{55a2ddeade994fc8b296f41c75185eb2,
title = "Association of bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis with urinary calculus: A nationwide population-based study",
abstract = "Introduction and hypothesis: Although one prior study reported an association between bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis (BPS/IC) and urinary calculi (UC), no population-based study to date has been conducted to explore this relationship. Therefore, using a population-based data set in Taiwan, this study set out to investigate the association between BPS/IC and a prior diagnosis of UC. Methods: This study included 9,269 cases who had received their first-time diagnosis of BPS/IC between 2006 and 2007 and 46,345 randomly selected controls. We used conditional logistic regression analysis to compute the odds ratio (OR) and its corresponding 95 {\%} confidence interval (CI) for having been previously diagnosed with UC between cases and controls. Results: There was a significant difference in the prevalence of prior UC between cases and controls (8.1 vs 4.3 {\%}, p <0.001). Conditional logistic regression analysis revealed that cases were more likely to have been previously diagnosed with UC than controls (OR = 1.70; 95 {\%} CI = 1.56-1.84) after adjusting for chronic pelvic pain, irritable bowel syndrome, fibromyalgia, chronic fatigue syndrome, depression, panic disorder, migraine, sicca syndrome, allergy, endometriosis, and asthma. BPS/IC was found to be significantly associated with prior UC regardless of stone location; the adjusted ORs of kidney calculus, ureter calculus, bladder calculus, and unspecified calculus when compared to controls were 1.58 (95 {\%} CI = 1.38-1.81), 1.73 (95 {\%} CI = 1.45-2.05), 3.80 (95 {\%} CI = 2.18-6.62), and 1.83 (95 {\%} CI = 1.59-2.11), respectively. Conclusions: This work generates the hypothesis that UC may be associated with BPS/IC.",
keywords = "Bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis, BPS/IC, Keyword: Interstitial cystitis, Urinary calculus",
author = "Joseph Keller and Chen, {Yi Kuang} and Lin, {Herng Ching}",
year = "2013",
month = "4",
doi = "10.1007/s00192-012-1917-6",
language = "English",
volume = "24",
pages = "565--571",
journal = "International Urogynecology Journal and Pelvic Floor Dysfunction",
issn = "0937-3462",
publisher = "Springer London",
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T1 - Association of bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis with urinary calculus

T2 - A nationwide population-based study

AU - Keller, Joseph

AU - Chen, Yi Kuang

AU - Lin, Herng Ching

PY - 2013/4

Y1 - 2013/4

N2 - Introduction and hypothesis: Although one prior study reported an association between bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis (BPS/IC) and urinary calculi (UC), no population-based study to date has been conducted to explore this relationship. Therefore, using a population-based data set in Taiwan, this study set out to investigate the association between BPS/IC and a prior diagnosis of UC. Methods: This study included 9,269 cases who had received their first-time diagnosis of BPS/IC between 2006 and 2007 and 46,345 randomly selected controls. We used conditional logistic regression analysis to compute the odds ratio (OR) and its corresponding 95 % confidence interval (CI) for having been previously diagnosed with UC between cases and controls. Results: There was a significant difference in the prevalence of prior UC between cases and controls (8.1 vs 4.3 %, p <0.001). Conditional logistic regression analysis revealed that cases were more likely to have been previously diagnosed with UC than controls (OR = 1.70; 95 % CI = 1.56-1.84) after adjusting for chronic pelvic pain, irritable bowel syndrome, fibromyalgia, chronic fatigue syndrome, depression, panic disorder, migraine, sicca syndrome, allergy, endometriosis, and asthma. BPS/IC was found to be significantly associated with prior UC regardless of stone location; the adjusted ORs of kidney calculus, ureter calculus, bladder calculus, and unspecified calculus when compared to controls were 1.58 (95 % CI = 1.38-1.81), 1.73 (95 % CI = 1.45-2.05), 3.80 (95 % CI = 2.18-6.62), and 1.83 (95 % CI = 1.59-2.11), respectively. Conclusions: This work generates the hypothesis that UC may be associated with BPS/IC.

AB - Introduction and hypothesis: Although one prior study reported an association between bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis (BPS/IC) and urinary calculi (UC), no population-based study to date has been conducted to explore this relationship. Therefore, using a population-based data set in Taiwan, this study set out to investigate the association between BPS/IC and a prior diagnosis of UC. Methods: This study included 9,269 cases who had received their first-time diagnosis of BPS/IC between 2006 and 2007 and 46,345 randomly selected controls. We used conditional logistic regression analysis to compute the odds ratio (OR) and its corresponding 95 % confidence interval (CI) for having been previously diagnosed with UC between cases and controls. Results: There was a significant difference in the prevalence of prior UC between cases and controls (8.1 vs 4.3 %, p <0.001). Conditional logistic regression analysis revealed that cases were more likely to have been previously diagnosed with UC than controls (OR = 1.70; 95 % CI = 1.56-1.84) after adjusting for chronic pelvic pain, irritable bowel syndrome, fibromyalgia, chronic fatigue syndrome, depression, panic disorder, migraine, sicca syndrome, allergy, endometriosis, and asthma. BPS/IC was found to be significantly associated with prior UC regardless of stone location; the adjusted ORs of kidney calculus, ureter calculus, bladder calculus, and unspecified calculus when compared to controls were 1.58 (95 % CI = 1.38-1.81), 1.73 (95 % CI = 1.45-2.05), 3.80 (95 % CI = 2.18-6.62), and 1.83 (95 % CI = 1.59-2.11), respectively. Conclusions: This work generates the hypothesis that UC may be associated with BPS/IC.

KW - Bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis

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KW - Keyword: Interstitial cystitis

KW - Urinary calculus

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