Abstract

This population-based case-control analysis investigated the association between osteoporosis and prior urinary calculus (UC) in Taiwan. We succeeded in detecting an association between osteoporosis and prior UC (adjusted odds ratio = 1.66). This association was consistent and significant regardless of stone location. Introduction: UC has been demonstrated to be a risk factor for osteoporotic fractures, but no studies to date have directly investigated the association between UC and osteoporosis. This case-control analysis aimed to investigate the association of osteoporosis with prior UC using a population-based dataset in Taiwan. Methods: We first identified 39,840 cases ≥40 years who received their first-time diagnosis of osteoporosis between 2002 and 2009 and then randomly selected 79,680 controls. We used conditional logistic regression analyses to compute the odds ratio (OR) and the corresponding 95 % confidence interval (CI) for having been previously diagnosed with UC between cases and controls. Results: The OR of having been previously diagnosed with UC for patients with osteoporosis was 1.66 (95 % CI = 1.59-1.73) when compared to controls after adjusting for geographic location, urbanization level, type I diabetes mellitus, coronary heart disease, hyperlipidemia, rheumatoid arthritis, stroke, renal disease, Parkinson's disease, hyperthyroidism, chronic hepatopathy, Cushing's syndrome, malabsorption, gastrectomy, obesity, and alcohol abuse/alcohol dependence syndrome. The results consistently showed that osteoporosis was significantly associated with a previous diagnosis of UC regardless of stone location; the adjusted ORs of prior kidney calculus, ureter calculus, bladder calculus, and unspecified calculus when compared to controls were 1.71 (95 % CI = 1.61-1.81), 1.60 (95 % CI = 1.47-1.74), 1.59 (95 % CI = 1.23-2.04), and 1.69 (95 % CI = 1.59-1.80), respectively. Conclusions: This study succeeded in detecting an association between osteoporosis and prior UC. In addition, our findings were consistent and significant regardless of stone location.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)651-657
Number of pages7
JournalOsteoporosis International
Volume24
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2013

Fingerprint

Urinary Calculi
Osteoporosis
Confidence Intervals
Population
Odds Ratio
Calculi
Taiwan
Alcoholism
Urinary Bladder Calculi
Geographic Locations
Urbanization
Osteoporotic Fractures
Kidney Calculi
Cushing Syndrome
Hyperthyroidism
Gastrectomy
Ureter
Hyperlipidemias
Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus
Coronary Disease

Keywords

  • Kidney calculus
  • Osteoporosis
  • Urinary calculus

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism

Cite this

Association between osteoporosis and urinary calculus : Evidence from a population-based study. / Keller, J. J.; Lin, Chia-Chin; Kang, J. H.; Lin, H. C.

In: Osteoporosis International, Vol. 24, No. 2, 02.2013, p. 651-657.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{4aed24982cee46708534838f3e99d15a,
title = "Association between osteoporosis and urinary calculus: Evidence from a population-based study",
abstract = "This population-based case-control analysis investigated the association between osteoporosis and prior urinary calculus (UC) in Taiwan. We succeeded in detecting an association between osteoporosis and prior UC (adjusted odds ratio = 1.66). This association was consistent and significant regardless of stone location. Introduction: UC has been demonstrated to be a risk factor for osteoporotic fractures, but no studies to date have directly investigated the association between UC and osteoporosis. This case-control analysis aimed to investigate the association of osteoporosis with prior UC using a population-based dataset in Taiwan. Methods: We first identified 39,840 cases ≥40 years who received their first-time diagnosis of osteoporosis between 2002 and 2009 and then randomly selected 79,680 controls. We used conditional logistic regression analyses to compute the odds ratio (OR) and the corresponding 95 {\%} confidence interval (CI) for having been previously diagnosed with UC between cases and controls. Results: The OR of having been previously diagnosed with UC for patients with osteoporosis was 1.66 (95 {\%} CI = 1.59-1.73) when compared to controls after adjusting for geographic location, urbanization level, type I diabetes mellitus, coronary heart disease, hyperlipidemia, rheumatoid arthritis, stroke, renal disease, Parkinson's disease, hyperthyroidism, chronic hepatopathy, Cushing's syndrome, malabsorption, gastrectomy, obesity, and alcohol abuse/alcohol dependence syndrome. The results consistently showed that osteoporosis was significantly associated with a previous diagnosis of UC regardless of stone location; the adjusted ORs of prior kidney calculus, ureter calculus, bladder calculus, and unspecified calculus when compared to controls were 1.71 (95 {\%} CI = 1.61-1.81), 1.60 (95 {\%} CI = 1.47-1.74), 1.59 (95 {\%} CI = 1.23-2.04), and 1.69 (95 {\%} CI = 1.59-1.80), respectively. Conclusions: This study succeeded in detecting an association between osteoporosis and prior UC. In addition, our findings were consistent and significant regardless of stone location.",
keywords = "Kidney calculus, Osteoporosis, Urinary calculus",
author = "Keller, {J. J.} and Chia-Chin Lin and Kang, {J. H.} and Lin, {H. C.}",
year = "2013",
month = "2",
doi = "10.1007/s00198-012-2019-5",
language = "English",
volume = "24",
pages = "651--657",
journal = "Osteoporosis International",
issn = "0937-941X",
publisher = "Springer London",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Association between osteoporosis and urinary calculus

T2 - Evidence from a population-based study

AU - Keller, J. J.

AU - Lin, Chia-Chin

AU - Kang, J. H.

AU - Lin, H. C.

PY - 2013/2

Y1 - 2013/2

N2 - This population-based case-control analysis investigated the association between osteoporosis and prior urinary calculus (UC) in Taiwan. We succeeded in detecting an association between osteoporosis and prior UC (adjusted odds ratio = 1.66). This association was consistent and significant regardless of stone location. Introduction: UC has been demonstrated to be a risk factor for osteoporotic fractures, but no studies to date have directly investigated the association between UC and osteoporosis. This case-control analysis aimed to investigate the association of osteoporosis with prior UC using a population-based dataset in Taiwan. Methods: We first identified 39,840 cases ≥40 years who received their first-time diagnosis of osteoporosis between 2002 and 2009 and then randomly selected 79,680 controls. We used conditional logistic regression analyses to compute the odds ratio (OR) and the corresponding 95 % confidence interval (CI) for having been previously diagnosed with UC between cases and controls. Results: The OR of having been previously diagnosed with UC for patients with osteoporosis was 1.66 (95 % CI = 1.59-1.73) when compared to controls after adjusting for geographic location, urbanization level, type I diabetes mellitus, coronary heart disease, hyperlipidemia, rheumatoid arthritis, stroke, renal disease, Parkinson's disease, hyperthyroidism, chronic hepatopathy, Cushing's syndrome, malabsorption, gastrectomy, obesity, and alcohol abuse/alcohol dependence syndrome. The results consistently showed that osteoporosis was significantly associated with a previous diagnosis of UC regardless of stone location; the adjusted ORs of prior kidney calculus, ureter calculus, bladder calculus, and unspecified calculus when compared to controls were 1.71 (95 % CI = 1.61-1.81), 1.60 (95 % CI = 1.47-1.74), 1.59 (95 % CI = 1.23-2.04), and 1.69 (95 % CI = 1.59-1.80), respectively. Conclusions: This study succeeded in detecting an association between osteoporosis and prior UC. In addition, our findings were consistent and significant regardless of stone location.

AB - This population-based case-control analysis investigated the association between osteoporosis and prior urinary calculus (UC) in Taiwan. We succeeded in detecting an association between osteoporosis and prior UC (adjusted odds ratio = 1.66). This association was consistent and significant regardless of stone location. Introduction: UC has been demonstrated to be a risk factor for osteoporotic fractures, but no studies to date have directly investigated the association between UC and osteoporosis. This case-control analysis aimed to investigate the association of osteoporosis with prior UC using a population-based dataset in Taiwan. Methods: We first identified 39,840 cases ≥40 years who received their first-time diagnosis of osteoporosis between 2002 and 2009 and then randomly selected 79,680 controls. We used conditional logistic regression analyses to compute the odds ratio (OR) and the corresponding 95 % confidence interval (CI) for having been previously diagnosed with UC between cases and controls. Results: The OR of having been previously diagnosed with UC for patients with osteoporosis was 1.66 (95 % CI = 1.59-1.73) when compared to controls after adjusting for geographic location, urbanization level, type I diabetes mellitus, coronary heart disease, hyperlipidemia, rheumatoid arthritis, stroke, renal disease, Parkinson's disease, hyperthyroidism, chronic hepatopathy, Cushing's syndrome, malabsorption, gastrectomy, obesity, and alcohol abuse/alcohol dependence syndrome. The results consistently showed that osteoporosis was significantly associated with a previous diagnosis of UC regardless of stone location; the adjusted ORs of prior kidney calculus, ureter calculus, bladder calculus, and unspecified calculus when compared to controls were 1.71 (95 % CI = 1.61-1.81), 1.60 (95 % CI = 1.47-1.74), 1.59 (95 % CI = 1.23-2.04), and 1.69 (95 % CI = 1.59-1.80), respectively. Conclusions: This study succeeded in detecting an association between osteoporosis and prior UC. In addition, our findings were consistent and significant regardless of stone location.

KW - Kidney calculus

KW - Osteoporosis

KW - Urinary calculus

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84873704240&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84873704240&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1007/s00198-012-2019-5

DO - 10.1007/s00198-012-2019-5

M3 - Article

C2 - 22592810

AN - SCOPUS:84873704240

VL - 24

SP - 651

EP - 657

JO - Osteoporosis International

JF - Osteoporosis International

SN - 0937-941X

IS - 2

ER -