Association between maternal age and the likelihood of a cesarean section: A population-based multivariate logistic regression analysis

Herng Ching Lin, Tzong Chyi Sheen, Chao Hsiun Tang, Senyeong Kao

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

58 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background. A majority of studies examining the relationship between advancing maternal age and the likelihood of cesarean section (CS) use data from regional samples or from a limited number of medical institutions. This study uses population-based data from Taiwan to explore the relationship between maternal age and the likelihood of a CS. Methods. The National Health Insurance Research Database (NHIRD) on registries of medical facilities and board-certified physicians and monthly claim summaries for inpatients were used. In total, 502 524 singleton deliveries were included in the study. Multivariate logistic regressions were performed with the presence of CS as the dependent variable and maternal age (34 years) as the independent variable. The study controlled for maternal indications, institution characteristics, maternal requests and attending physician characteristics. Results. CS rates for the age groups 34 years were 17.7, 27.4, 37.4 and 47.5%, respectively. The regression analyses consistently showed that the likelihood of a CS significantly increased with advancing maternal age within each category of complication after adjusting for medical institution characteristics and characteristics of the attending physician. Conclusions. This study found that, after adjusting for maternal indications, and healthcare institution and physician characteristics, there was a significant relationship between advancing maternal age and an increased likelihood of a CS. This finding, together with the high CS rate of 32.1% in Taiwan, one of the highest reported in the world today, highlights an imperative need to devise interventions to reduce the frequency of CSs.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1178-1183
Number of pages6
JournalActa Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica
Volume83
Issue number12
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2004

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Maternal Age
Cesarean Section
Logistic Models
Regression Analysis
Population
Physicians
Mothers
Taiwan
National Health Programs
Registries
Inpatients
Age Groups
Databases
Delivery of Health Care
Research

Keywords

  • Cesarean section
  • Cesarean section rate
  • Maternal age

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Obstetrics and Gynaecology

Cite this

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title = "Association between maternal age and the likelihood of a cesarean section: A population-based multivariate logistic regression analysis",
abstract = "Background. A majority of studies examining the relationship between advancing maternal age and the likelihood of cesarean section (CS) use data from regional samples or from a limited number of medical institutions. This study uses population-based data from Taiwan to explore the relationship between maternal age and the likelihood of a CS. Methods. The National Health Insurance Research Database (NHIRD) on registries of medical facilities and board-certified physicians and monthly claim summaries for inpatients were used. In total, 502 524 singleton deliveries were included in the study. Multivariate logistic regressions were performed with the presence of CS as the dependent variable and maternal age (34 years) as the independent variable. The study controlled for maternal indications, institution characteristics, maternal requests and attending physician characteristics. Results. CS rates for the age groups 34 years were 17.7, 27.4, 37.4 and 47.5{\%}, respectively. The regression analyses consistently showed that the likelihood of a CS significantly increased with advancing maternal age within each category of complication after adjusting for medical institution characteristics and characteristics of the attending physician. Conclusions. This study found that, after adjusting for maternal indications, and healthcare institution and physician characteristics, there was a significant relationship between advancing maternal age and an increased likelihood of a CS. This finding, together with the high CS rate of 32.1{\%} in Taiwan, one of the highest reported in the world today, highlights an imperative need to devise interventions to reduce the frequency of CSs.",
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AU - Kao, Senyeong

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N2 - Background. A majority of studies examining the relationship between advancing maternal age and the likelihood of cesarean section (CS) use data from regional samples or from a limited number of medical institutions. This study uses population-based data from Taiwan to explore the relationship between maternal age and the likelihood of a CS. Methods. The National Health Insurance Research Database (NHIRD) on registries of medical facilities and board-certified physicians and monthly claim summaries for inpatients were used. In total, 502 524 singleton deliveries were included in the study. Multivariate logistic regressions were performed with the presence of CS as the dependent variable and maternal age (34 years) as the independent variable. The study controlled for maternal indications, institution characteristics, maternal requests and attending physician characteristics. Results. CS rates for the age groups 34 years were 17.7, 27.4, 37.4 and 47.5%, respectively. The regression analyses consistently showed that the likelihood of a CS significantly increased with advancing maternal age within each category of complication after adjusting for medical institution characteristics and characteristics of the attending physician. Conclusions. This study found that, after adjusting for maternal indications, and healthcare institution and physician characteristics, there was a significant relationship between advancing maternal age and an increased likelihood of a CS. This finding, together with the high CS rate of 32.1% in Taiwan, one of the highest reported in the world today, highlights an imperative need to devise interventions to reduce the frequency of CSs.

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KW - Cesarean section rate

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