Association between gout and vertigo in a Taiwanese population

Yu Ting Lin, Hui Wen Lin, Yu-Chen Huang, Wen Tsao Ho, Yu Chuan Li, Ting Jui Chen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

There are reports of an association between benign paroxysmal positional vertigo and hyperuricemia. We sought to determine the risk of vertigo among patients with gout compared with the general population, using a nationwide Taiwanese population-based claims database. Our study cohort consisted of patients with a diagnosis of gout disorders in 2004 (N = 18 773). Four age- and gender-matched controls for every patient in the study cohort were selected using random sampling as the comparison cohort (N = 75 092). All subjects were followed from the date of cohort entry until they developed vertigo or to the end of 2006. Cox proportional hazard regressions were performed to evaluate the 3-year vertigo-free survival rates. Of the total sample, 2563 (incidence, 10.09 per 1000 person-years) had vertigo during the 3-year follow-up period: 570 (incidence, 11.78 per 1000 person-years) from the study cohort and 1993 (incidence, 9.69 per 1000 person-years) from the comparison cohort. The adjusted hazard ratios (HR) of peripheral and central vertigo in patients with gout compared with controls during the 2-3-year follow-up were 1.17 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.05-1.29, p = 0.003) and 1.08 (95% CI = 0.86-1.36, p = 0.53), respectively. This is the first population-based study performed to suggest that patients with gout may have an increased risk of peripheral vertigo but not central vertigo. Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo may be the reason for the observed association; however, future studies are required to further ascertain the relationship between gout and the various causes of peripheral vertigo.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)857-861
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Clinical Neuroscience
Volume20
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2013

Fingerprint

Gout
Vertigo
Population
Cohort Studies
Incidence
Confidence Intervals
Hyperuricemia
Survival Rate
Databases

Keywords

  • Central vertigo
  • Gout
  • Peripheral vertigo
  • Vertigo

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Neurology
  • Physiology (medical)
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Association between gout and vertigo in a Taiwanese population. / Lin, Yu Ting; Lin, Hui Wen; Huang, Yu-Chen; Ho, Wen Tsao; Li, Yu Chuan; Chen, Ting Jui.

In: Journal of Clinical Neuroscience, Vol. 20, No. 6, 06.2013, p. 857-861.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lin, Yu Ting ; Lin, Hui Wen ; Huang, Yu-Chen ; Ho, Wen Tsao ; Li, Yu Chuan ; Chen, Ting Jui. / Association between gout and vertigo in a Taiwanese population. In: Journal of Clinical Neuroscience. 2013 ; Vol. 20, No. 6. pp. 857-861.
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