Assessment of videoendoscopy-assisted abdominoplasty for diastasis recti patients

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

BACKGROUND: The objective of this retrospective analysis was to assess the treatment of endoscope abdominoplasty for diastasis recti deformity patients.

METHODS: From January 1999 to January 2011, 88 patients ranging from 35 to 46 years in age were treated with videoendoscopy-assisted minimally invasive surgery. All patients were Asian. Early (< 3 months) and late (> 6 months) complications were assessed throughout a follow-up period of up to 66 months.

RESULTS: Observations were conducted at the end of three weeks, six months, and 66 months. Early on, all patients experienced numbness with local paresthesia (100%) closely after treatment, and reported the feelings to subside by six months post-treatment. Four patients (4.5%) experienced ecchymosis, and three patients (3.4%) were affected by seroma. One patient (1.1%) had dyspnea immediately after surgery, which recovered after oxygen (O2) administration. Only one patient (1.1%) experienced minimal skin loss, which recovered after 3 months of surgery, and there were no further complications. Hypertrophic scars were apparent in three patients (3.4%) who showed no unwanted signs or further complications after post-operative scar care. No hematoma had been reported. All complications subsided (> 6 months) postoperatively.

CONCLUSIONS: Videoendoscopy-assisted abdominoplasty can be used for diastasis recti deformity with minimal excess skin. Our study demonstrated effects against the formation of seroma and other complications.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)252-6
Number of pages5
JournalBiomedical Journal
Volume36
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 15 2013
Externally publishedYes

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Abdominoplasty
Seroma
Ecchymosis
Hypertrophic Cicatrix
Skin
Minimally Invasive Surgical Procedures
Hypesthesia
Paresthesia
Endoscopes
Hematoma
Dyspnea
Cicatrix
Emotions
Therapeutics
Oxygen

Keywords

  • Abdominoplasty
  • Adult
  • Endoscopy
  • Female
  • Humans
  • Middle Aged
  • Minimally Invasive Surgical Procedures
  • Rectus Abdominis
  • Retrospective Studies
  • Treatment Outcome
  • Journal Article

Cite this

Assessment of videoendoscopy-assisted abdominoplasty for diastasis recti patients. / Chang, Cheng-Jen.

In: Biomedical Journal, Vol. 36, No. 5, 15.11.2013, p. 252-6.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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