Assessment of complement activation during membrane-based plasmapheresis procedures

Thierry Burnouf, Michel Eber, Daniel Kientz, Jean Pierre Cazenave, Thomas Burkhardt

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Previous studies have suggested that plasmapheresis procedures using a separation membrane may activate the complement system and release anaphylatoxins. This study determines the content in C3a/C3ades Arg and C5a/C5ades Arg in plasma donations obtained by the new Haemonetics® Filter Core (FC) procedure and compares it to Baxter Autopheresis C® (Auto-C). FC performs sequential blood centrifugation and plasma filtration on a microporous polyethersulfone membrane, while Auto-C removes blood cells by simultaneous gravitation and filtration on a rotating nylon membrane. One group of 34 donors donated on FC and two groups of 30 and 10 donors on Auto-C. Plasma aliquots were taken from the plasma units within 30 min of the end of the collection procedures, frozen at <-30°C and assessed for C3a and C5a at various time points of storage. Mean C3a/C3ades Arg in FC plasma (N = 34) was 1,151 (range: 526-2,991), 1,092 (range: 349-3498), and 507 (range: 307-815) ng/ml at time of collection and after 6 and 12 months of storage, respectively. Respective CSa/C5ades Arg was 26.6 (range 4.9-74), 18.9 (9.5-42.6), and 30.9 (range: 10.7-62.3) ng/ml. Mean C3a/C3ades Arg was higher in Auto-C (P <0.001): 4,724 ng/ml (N = 10; range: 2,400-7,360) and > 4,149 ng/ ml (N = 30; 2,408- > 6,430) after 3 and 18 months storage, respectively. Mean C5a/C5ades Arg was 32.1 ng/ml (N = 30; range: 10.6-57.2) after 18 months of storage. Complement activation in FC plasmas appears limited compared to Auto-C, suggesting better biocompatibility of this collection device and/or a favourable impact of the sequential cell centrifugation/filtration technology used. Further studies are needed to explain differences in complement activation between apheresis procedures and to assess clinical impacts, if any.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)142-147
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Clinical Apheresis
Volume19
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2004
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Plasmapheresis
Complement Activation
Membranes
Centrifugation
Anaphylatoxins
Blood Component Removal
Nylons
Gravitation
Blood Cells
Technology
Equipment and Supplies

Keywords

  • Apheresis
  • C3a
  • C5a
  • Complement
  • Plasma

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Hematology

Cite this

Assessment of complement activation during membrane-based plasmapheresis procedures. / Burnouf, Thierry; Eber, Michel; Kientz, Daniel; Cazenave, Jean Pierre; Burkhardt, Thomas.

In: Journal of Clinical Apheresis, Vol. 19, No. 3, 2004, p. 142-147.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Burnouf, Thierry ; Eber, Michel ; Kientz, Daniel ; Cazenave, Jean Pierre ; Burkhardt, Thomas. / Assessment of complement activation during membrane-based plasmapheresis procedures. In: Journal of Clinical Apheresis. 2004 ; Vol. 19, No. 3. pp. 142-147.
@article{bfded70c90984533a1b5b03a0d1954d3,
title = "Assessment of complement activation during membrane-based plasmapheresis procedures",
abstract = "Previous studies have suggested that plasmapheresis procedures using a separation membrane may activate the complement system and release anaphylatoxins. This study determines the content in C3a/C3ades Arg and C5a/C5ades Arg in plasma donations obtained by the new Haemonetics{\circledR} Filter Core (FC) procedure and compares it to Baxter Autopheresis C{\circledR} (Auto-C). FC performs sequential blood centrifugation and plasma filtration on a microporous polyethersulfone membrane, while Auto-C removes blood cells by simultaneous gravitation and filtration on a rotating nylon membrane. One group of 34 donors donated on FC and two groups of 30 and 10 donors on Auto-C. Plasma aliquots were taken from the plasma units within 30 min of the end of the collection procedures, frozen at <-30°C and assessed for C3a and C5a at various time points of storage. Mean C3a/C3ades Arg in FC plasma (N = 34) was 1,151 (range: 526-2,991), 1,092 (range: 349-3498), and 507 (range: 307-815) ng/ml at time of collection and after 6 and 12 months of storage, respectively. Respective CSa/C5ades Arg was 26.6 (range 4.9-74), 18.9 (9.5-42.6), and 30.9 (range: 10.7-62.3) ng/ml. Mean C3a/C3ades Arg was higher in Auto-C (P <0.001): 4,724 ng/ml (N = 10; range: 2,400-7,360) and > 4,149 ng/ ml (N = 30; 2,408- > 6,430) after 3 and 18 months storage, respectively. Mean C5a/C5ades Arg was 32.1 ng/ml (N = 30; range: 10.6-57.2) after 18 months of storage. Complement activation in FC plasmas appears limited compared to Auto-C, suggesting better biocompatibility of this collection device and/or a favourable impact of the sequential cell centrifugation/filtration technology used. Further studies are needed to explain differences in complement activation between apheresis procedures and to assess clinical impacts, if any.",
keywords = "Apheresis, C3a, C5a, Complement, Plasma",
author = "Thierry Burnouf and Michel Eber and Daniel Kientz and Cazenave, {Jean Pierre} and Thomas Burkhardt",
year = "2004",
doi = "10.1002/jca.20019",
language = "English",
volume = "19",
pages = "142--147",
journal = "Journal of Clinical Apheresis",
issn = "0733-2459",
publisher = "Wiley-Liss Inc.",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Assessment of complement activation during membrane-based plasmapheresis procedures

AU - Burnouf, Thierry

AU - Eber, Michel

AU - Kientz, Daniel

AU - Cazenave, Jean Pierre

AU - Burkhardt, Thomas

PY - 2004

Y1 - 2004

N2 - Previous studies have suggested that plasmapheresis procedures using a separation membrane may activate the complement system and release anaphylatoxins. This study determines the content in C3a/C3ades Arg and C5a/C5ades Arg in plasma donations obtained by the new Haemonetics® Filter Core (FC) procedure and compares it to Baxter Autopheresis C® (Auto-C). FC performs sequential blood centrifugation and plasma filtration on a microporous polyethersulfone membrane, while Auto-C removes blood cells by simultaneous gravitation and filtration on a rotating nylon membrane. One group of 34 donors donated on FC and two groups of 30 and 10 donors on Auto-C. Plasma aliquots were taken from the plasma units within 30 min of the end of the collection procedures, frozen at <-30°C and assessed for C3a and C5a at various time points of storage. Mean C3a/C3ades Arg in FC plasma (N = 34) was 1,151 (range: 526-2,991), 1,092 (range: 349-3498), and 507 (range: 307-815) ng/ml at time of collection and after 6 and 12 months of storage, respectively. Respective CSa/C5ades Arg was 26.6 (range 4.9-74), 18.9 (9.5-42.6), and 30.9 (range: 10.7-62.3) ng/ml. Mean C3a/C3ades Arg was higher in Auto-C (P <0.001): 4,724 ng/ml (N = 10; range: 2,400-7,360) and > 4,149 ng/ ml (N = 30; 2,408- > 6,430) after 3 and 18 months storage, respectively. Mean C5a/C5ades Arg was 32.1 ng/ml (N = 30; range: 10.6-57.2) after 18 months of storage. Complement activation in FC plasmas appears limited compared to Auto-C, suggesting better biocompatibility of this collection device and/or a favourable impact of the sequential cell centrifugation/filtration technology used. Further studies are needed to explain differences in complement activation between apheresis procedures and to assess clinical impacts, if any.

AB - Previous studies have suggested that plasmapheresis procedures using a separation membrane may activate the complement system and release anaphylatoxins. This study determines the content in C3a/C3ades Arg and C5a/C5ades Arg in plasma donations obtained by the new Haemonetics® Filter Core (FC) procedure and compares it to Baxter Autopheresis C® (Auto-C). FC performs sequential blood centrifugation and plasma filtration on a microporous polyethersulfone membrane, while Auto-C removes blood cells by simultaneous gravitation and filtration on a rotating nylon membrane. One group of 34 donors donated on FC and two groups of 30 and 10 donors on Auto-C. Plasma aliquots were taken from the plasma units within 30 min of the end of the collection procedures, frozen at <-30°C and assessed for C3a and C5a at various time points of storage. Mean C3a/C3ades Arg in FC plasma (N = 34) was 1,151 (range: 526-2,991), 1,092 (range: 349-3498), and 507 (range: 307-815) ng/ml at time of collection and after 6 and 12 months of storage, respectively. Respective CSa/C5ades Arg was 26.6 (range 4.9-74), 18.9 (9.5-42.6), and 30.9 (range: 10.7-62.3) ng/ml. Mean C3a/C3ades Arg was higher in Auto-C (P <0.001): 4,724 ng/ml (N = 10; range: 2,400-7,360) and > 4,149 ng/ ml (N = 30; 2,408- > 6,430) after 3 and 18 months storage, respectively. Mean C5a/C5ades Arg was 32.1 ng/ml (N = 30; range: 10.6-57.2) after 18 months of storage. Complement activation in FC plasmas appears limited compared to Auto-C, suggesting better biocompatibility of this collection device and/or a favourable impact of the sequential cell centrifugation/filtration technology used. Further studies are needed to explain differences in complement activation between apheresis procedures and to assess clinical impacts, if any.

KW - Apheresis

KW - C3a

KW - C5a

KW - Complement

KW - Plasma

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=6344229753&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=6344229753&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1002/jca.20019

DO - 10.1002/jca.20019

M3 - Article

VL - 19

SP - 142

EP - 147

JO - Journal of Clinical Apheresis

JF - Journal of Clinical Apheresis

SN - 0733-2459

IS - 3

ER -