Antidepressant-like effects of Perilla frutescens seed oil during a forced swimming test

Hsiu Chuan Lee, Hsiang Kai Ko, Brian E T G Huang, Yan Hwa Chu, Shih Yi Huang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Unipolar depressive disorder may become one of the major leading causes of disease burden by 2030 according to the World Health Organization (WHO). Thus, the discovery of antidepressive foods is attractive and could have considerable impacts worldwide. We investigated the antidepressant-like effects of Perilla frutescens seed oil on adult male rats subjected to a forced swimming test (FST). Forty Sprague-Dawley rats were housed and fed various diets, including soybean oil-rich, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA)-rich, and P. frutescens seed oil-rich diets for 6 weeks. After the dietary intervention, animals were tested using an FST and were sacrificed after the test. We analyzed the fatty acid profiles of red blood cells (RBCs) and the brain prefrontal cortex (PFC). Levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), serotonin, and dopamine in the PFC were also determined. After the FST, the imipramine, EPA-rich, and P. frutescens seed oil-rich groups showed significant shorter immobility time and longer struggling time than the control group (p <0.05). Levels of BDNF in the P. frutescens seed oil-rich group and levels of serotonin in the EPA-rich group were significantly (p <0.05) higher than those of the control group. Moreover, the BDNF concentration in the PFC was significantly positively correlated with the struggling time. However, there were no significant differences in dopamine levels between the intervention groups and the control group. In conclusion, a P. frutescens seed oil-rich diet exhibited antidepressant-like properties through modulation of fatty acid profiles and BDNF expression in the brain during an FST.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)990-996
Number of pages7
JournalFood and Function
Volume5
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014

Fingerprint

Perilla frutescens
antidepressants
seed oils
Antidepressive Agents
Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor
neurotrophins
Eicosapentaenoic Acid
brain
Prefrontal Cortex
eicosapentaenoic acid
Diet
lissamine rhodamine B
Control Groups
testing
Dopamine
dopamine
Serotonin
serotonin
Fatty Acids
fatty acid composition

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Food Science
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Antidepressant-like effects of Perilla frutescens seed oil during a forced swimming test. / Lee, Hsiu Chuan; Ko, Hsiang Kai; Huang, Brian E T G; Chu, Yan Hwa; Huang, Shih Yi.

In: Food and Function, Vol. 5, No. 5, 2014, p. 990-996.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lee, Hsiu Chuan ; Ko, Hsiang Kai ; Huang, Brian E T G ; Chu, Yan Hwa ; Huang, Shih Yi. / Antidepressant-like effects of Perilla frutescens seed oil during a forced swimming test. In: Food and Function. 2014 ; Vol. 5, No. 5. pp. 990-996.
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