Angiotensin-converting enzyme insertion/deletion polymorphism contributes high risk for chronic kidney disease in Asian male with hypertension-a meta-regression analysis of 98 observational studies

Chin Lin, Hsin Yi Yang, Chia Chao Wu, Herng Sheng Lee, Yuh Feng Lin, Kuo Cheng Lu, Chi Ming Chu, Fu Huang Lin, Sen Yeong Kao, Sui Lung Su

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Background: Associations between angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) gene insertion/deletion (I/D) polymorphisms and chronic kidney disease (CKD) have been extensively studied, with most studies reporting that individuals with the D allele have a higher risk. Although some factors, such as ethnicity, may moderate the association between ACE I/D polymorphisms and CKD risk, gender-dependent effects on the CKD risk remain controversial. Objectives: This study investigated the gender-dependent effects of ACE I/D polymorphisms on CKD risk. Data sources: PubMed, the Cochrane library, and EMBASE were searched for studies published before January 2013. Study eligibility criteria, participants, and interventions: Cross-sectional surveys and case-control studies analyzing ACE I/D polymorphisms and CKD were included. They were required to match the following criteria: age >18 years, absence of rare diseases, and Asian or Caucasian ethnicity. Study appraisal and synthesis methods: The effect of carrying the D allele on CKD risk was assessed by meta-analysis and meta-regression using random-effects models. Results: Ethnicity [odds ratio (OR): 1.24; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.08-1.42] and hypertension (OR: 1.55; 95% CI: 1.04-2.32) had significant moderate effects on the association between ACE I/D polymorphisms and CKD risk, but they were not significant in the diabetic nephropathy subgroup. Males had higher OR for the association between ACE I/D polymorphisms and CKD risk than females in Asians but not Caucasians, regardless of adjustment for hypertension (p

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere87604
JournalPLoS One
Volume9
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 31 2014

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peptidyl-dipeptidase A
Peptidyl-Dipeptidase A
observational studies
kidney diseases
Polymorphism
Chronic Renal Insufficiency
Regression analysis
hypertension
Observational Studies
Meta-Analysis
regression analysis
Regression Analysis
genetic polymorphism
Hypertension
nationalities and ethnic groups
odds ratio
Odds Ratio
Association reactions
confidence interval
Alleles

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Medicine(all)

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Angiotensin-converting enzyme insertion/deletion polymorphism contributes high risk for chronic kidney disease in Asian male with hypertension-a meta-regression analysis of 98 observational studies. / Lin, Chin; Yang, Hsin Yi; Wu, Chia Chao; Lee, Herng Sheng; Lin, Yuh Feng; Lu, Kuo Cheng; Chu, Chi Ming; Lin, Fu Huang; Kao, Sen Yeong; Su, Sui Lung.

In: PLoS One, Vol. 9, No. 1, e87604, 31.01.2014.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lin, Chin ; Yang, Hsin Yi ; Wu, Chia Chao ; Lee, Herng Sheng ; Lin, Yuh Feng ; Lu, Kuo Cheng ; Chu, Chi Ming ; Lin, Fu Huang ; Kao, Sen Yeong ; Su, Sui Lung. / Angiotensin-converting enzyme insertion/deletion polymorphism contributes high risk for chronic kidney disease in Asian male with hypertension-a meta-regression analysis of 98 observational studies. In: PLoS One. 2014 ; Vol. 9, No. 1.
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