Anatomic dissociation between the intrahepatic bile duct and portal vein: Risk factors for left hepatectomy

Yu Fan Cheng, Tung Liang Huang, Chao Long Chen, Shyr Ming Sheen-Chen, Chun Chung Lui, Tai Yi Chen, Tze Yu Lee

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

29 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The anatomic variations of the intrahepatic portal vein and bile duct were analyzed to evaluate the potential risk of left hepatectomy. A total of 210 cholangiograms and hepatic arterioportograms were performed in which the ramifications of the intrahepatic portal vein and bile duct were investigated. The orientation of the intrahepatic duct and portal vein were classified into five types. In 175 patients (83.33%), the intrahepatic portal vein and bile duct had the same anatomic classification. In 24 patients (11.43%), the right anterior or posterior intrahepatic duct drained into the left hepatic duct at the umbilical portion (type IV); there were only 15 patients (7.14%) whose portal veins fell into this category. All patients with type IV portal veins had type IV hepatic ducts, but there were 9/49 patients (18.36%) whose hepatic duct distribution belonged to type IV but their portal veins belonged to type II (6 cases) or III (3 cases). Without complete knowledge of the intrahepatic portal and biliary anatomy, insufficient portal perfusion and bile duct complications may result from the left hepatectomy operation. Preoperative portal vein evaluation or left portal vein clamping can provide significant information, but there are still 18.36% of patients where type IV biliary ducts were not detected in those with type II and III portal veins. Cholangiography is of paramount importance in these two groups of patients, as it can prevent inadvertent injury to the right intrahepatic ducts, which drain into the left intrahepatic duct. On the other hand, intraoperative ultrasonography is recommended to identify or exclude an aberrant portal vein if type VI biliary anatomy is detected during intraoperative cholangiography.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)297-300
Number of pages4
JournalWorld Journal of Surgery
Volume21
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 12 1997
Externally publishedYes

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Intrahepatic Bile Ducts
Hepatectomy
Portal Vein
Bile Ducts
Common Hepatic Duct
Cholangiography
Anatomy
Anatomic Variation
Umbilicus
Patient Rights
Constriction
Ultrasonography
Perfusion

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

Cite this

Anatomic dissociation between the intrahepatic bile duct and portal vein : Risk factors for left hepatectomy. / Cheng, Yu Fan; Huang, Tung Liang; Chen, Chao Long; Sheen-Chen, Shyr Ming; Lui, Chun Chung; Chen, Tai Yi; Lee, Tze Yu.

In: World Journal of Surgery, Vol. 21, No. 3, 12.03.1997, p. 297-300.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Cheng, Yu Fan ; Huang, Tung Liang ; Chen, Chao Long ; Sheen-Chen, Shyr Ming ; Lui, Chun Chung ; Chen, Tai Yi ; Lee, Tze Yu. / Anatomic dissociation between the intrahepatic bile duct and portal vein : Risk factors for left hepatectomy. In: World Journal of Surgery. 1997 ; Vol. 21, No. 3. pp. 297-300.
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