Adult mouse venous hypertension model

Common carotid artery to external jugular vein anastomosis

Shun Tai Yang, Ana Rodriguez-Hernandez, Espen J. Walker, William L. Young, Hua Su, Michael T. Lawton

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The understanding of the pathophysiology of brain arteriovenous malformations and arteriovenous fistulas has improved thanks to animal models. A rat model creating an artificial fistula between the common carotid artery (CCA) and the external jugular vein (EJV) has been widely described and proved technically feasible. This construct provokes a consistent cerebral venous hypertension (CVH), and therefore has helped studying the contribution of venous hypertension to formation, clinical symptoms, and prognosis of brain AVMs and dural AVFs. Equivalent mice models have been only scarcely described and have shown trouble with stenosis of the fistula. An established murine model would allow the study of not only pathophysiology but also potential genetic therapies for these cerebrovascular diseases. We present a model of arteriovenous fistula that produces a durable intracranial venous hypertension in the mouse. Microsurgical anastomosis of the murine CCA and EJV can be difficult due to diminutive anatomy and frequently result in a non-patent fistula. In this step-by-step protocol we address all the important challenges encountered during this procedure. Avoiding excessive retraction of the vein during the exposure, using 11-0 sutures instead of 10-0, and making a carefully planned end-to-side anastomosis are some of the critical steps. Although this method requires advanced microsurgical skills and a longer learning curve that the equivalent in the rat, it can be consistently developed. This novel model has been designed to integrate transgenic mouse techniques with a previously well-established experimental system that has proved useful to study brain AVMs and dural AVFs. By opening the possibility of using transgenic mice, a broader spectrum of valid models can be achieved and genetic treatments can also be tested. The experimental construct could also be further adapted to the study of other cerebrovascular diseases related with venous hypertension such as migraine, transient global amnesia, transient monocular blindness, etc.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere50472
JournalJournal of Visualized Experiments
Issue number95
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 27 2015
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Common Carotid Artery
Jugular Veins
Fistula
Cerebrovascular Disorders
Arteriovenous Fistula
Hypertension
Transgenic Mice
Brain
Transient Global Amnesia
Amaurosis Fugax
Intracranial Hypertension
Learning Curve
Arteriovenous Malformations
Migraine Disorders
Genetic Therapy
Sutures
Veins
Anatomy
Pathologic Constriction
Animal Models

Keywords

  • Anastomosis
  • Arteriovenous fistula
  • Brain arteriovenous malformation
  • Dural fistula
  • Issue 95
  • Medicine
  • Mouse model
  • Venous hypertension

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Chemical Engineering(all)
  • Immunology and Microbiology(all)
  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Adult mouse venous hypertension model : Common carotid artery to external jugular vein anastomosis. / Yang, Shun Tai; Rodriguez-Hernandez, Ana; Walker, Espen J.; Young, William L.; Su, Hua; Lawton, Michael T.

In: Journal of Visualized Experiments, No. 95, e50472, 27.01.2015.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Yang, Shun Tai ; Rodriguez-Hernandez, Ana ; Walker, Espen J. ; Young, William L. ; Su, Hua ; Lawton, Michael T. / Adult mouse venous hypertension model : Common carotid artery to external jugular vein anastomosis. In: Journal of Visualized Experiments. 2015 ; No. 95.
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