Acupressure, Sleep, and Quality of Life in Institutionalized Older Adults: A Randomized Controlled Trial

Fu Chih Lai, I. Hui Chen, Pao Ju Chen, I. Ju Chen, Hui Wen Chien, Chih Fen Yuan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: Nursing home (NH) residents suffer from sleep disturbances which are associated with a low quality of life (QoL). The purpose of this study was to explore the effectiveness of comparing acupressure on specific acupoints with acupressure on non-specific acupoints in older NH residents with sleep disturbances. Design: A randomized control trial with a pre- and post-test design. Setting: One NH in Taiwan. Participants: Sixty-two older NH residents were randomly assigned to an experimental group (n = 31) and a sham-controlled group (n = 31). Intervention: The experimental group received acupressure on the Tian-Zhu, Ju-Que, Yong-Quan, Bai-Hui, and Nei-Guan acupoints three times a week for 8 weeks, for 24 minutes each time, while the control group received a massage at locations with no acupoints, which were 10 mm from the true points, at the same frequency as the experimental group. Measurements: The primary outcome was measured using the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) and the secondary outcome was measured using the Short-form 36 (SF-36). Data were collected at baseline, the end of treatment, and 4 weeks after completion of treatment. Results: Compared to the control group, the experimental group had significantly better scores on the PSQI (t = -7.72, P < 0.001) and SF-36 (t = 1.34, P < 0.001) during the intervention period. The improvements in the PSQI and SF-36 scores were still significant (P < 0.001) after adjusting for confounding variables by generalized estimating equations. Conclusions: Results suggest that acupressure on the Tian-Zhu, Ju-Que, Yong-Quan, Bai-Hui, and Nei-Guan acupoints can improve the quality of sleep and life among NH residents. Acupressure is a promising intervention that may improve well-being for NH residents with sleep disturbances.

Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of the American Geriatrics Society
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 2017

Fingerprint

Acupressure
Acupuncture Points
Nursing Homes
Sleep
Randomized Controlled Trials
Quality of Life
Control Groups
Confounding Factors (Epidemiology)
Massage
Taiwan

Keywords

  • Acupressure
  • Complementary therapies
  • Sleep disturbances

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geriatrics and Gerontology

Cite this

Acupressure, Sleep, and Quality of Life in Institutionalized Older Adults : A Randomized Controlled Trial. / Lai, Fu Chih; Chen, I. Hui; Chen, Pao Ju; Chen, I. Ju; Chien, Hui Wen; Yuan, Chih Fen.

In: Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, 2017.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{e5198b669f6547259d4b0e469c16c3c3,
title = "Acupressure, Sleep, and Quality of Life in Institutionalized Older Adults: A Randomized Controlled Trial",
abstract = "Objectives: Nursing home (NH) residents suffer from sleep disturbances which are associated with a low quality of life (QoL). The purpose of this study was to explore the effectiveness of comparing acupressure on specific acupoints with acupressure on non-specific acupoints in older NH residents with sleep disturbances. Design: A randomized control trial with a pre- and post-test design. Setting: One NH in Taiwan. Participants: Sixty-two older NH residents were randomly assigned to an experimental group (n = 31) and a sham-controlled group (n = 31). Intervention: The experimental group received acupressure on the Tian-Zhu, Ju-Que, Yong-Quan, Bai-Hui, and Nei-Guan acupoints three times a week for 8 weeks, for 24 minutes each time, while the control group received a massage at locations with no acupoints, which were 10 mm from the true points, at the same frequency as the experimental group. Measurements: The primary outcome was measured using the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) and the secondary outcome was measured using the Short-form 36 (SF-36). Data were collected at baseline, the end of treatment, and 4 weeks after completion of treatment. Results: Compared to the control group, the experimental group had significantly better scores on the PSQI (t = -7.72, P < 0.001) and SF-36 (t = 1.34, P < 0.001) during the intervention period. The improvements in the PSQI and SF-36 scores were still significant (P < 0.001) after adjusting for confounding variables by generalized estimating equations. Conclusions: Results suggest that acupressure on the Tian-Zhu, Ju-Que, Yong-Quan, Bai-Hui, and Nei-Guan acupoints can improve the quality of sleep and life among NH residents. Acupressure is a promising intervention that may improve well-being for NH residents with sleep disturbances.",
keywords = "Acupressure, Complementary therapies, Sleep disturbances",
author = "Lai, {Fu Chih} and Chen, {I. Hui} and Chen, {Pao Ju} and Chen, {I. Ju} and Chien, {Hui Wen} and Yuan, {Chih Fen}",
year = "2017",
doi = "10.1111/jgs.14729",
language = "English",
journal = "Journal of the American Geriatrics Society",
issn = "0002-8614",
publisher = "John Wiley & Sons, Ltd (10.1111)",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Acupressure, Sleep, and Quality of Life in Institutionalized Older Adults

T2 - A Randomized Controlled Trial

AU - Lai, Fu Chih

AU - Chen, I. Hui

AU - Chen, Pao Ju

AU - Chen, I. Ju

AU - Chien, Hui Wen

AU - Yuan, Chih Fen

PY - 2017

Y1 - 2017

N2 - Objectives: Nursing home (NH) residents suffer from sleep disturbances which are associated with a low quality of life (QoL). The purpose of this study was to explore the effectiveness of comparing acupressure on specific acupoints with acupressure on non-specific acupoints in older NH residents with sleep disturbances. Design: A randomized control trial with a pre- and post-test design. Setting: One NH in Taiwan. Participants: Sixty-two older NH residents were randomly assigned to an experimental group (n = 31) and a sham-controlled group (n = 31). Intervention: The experimental group received acupressure on the Tian-Zhu, Ju-Que, Yong-Quan, Bai-Hui, and Nei-Guan acupoints three times a week for 8 weeks, for 24 minutes each time, while the control group received a massage at locations with no acupoints, which were 10 mm from the true points, at the same frequency as the experimental group. Measurements: The primary outcome was measured using the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) and the secondary outcome was measured using the Short-form 36 (SF-36). Data were collected at baseline, the end of treatment, and 4 weeks after completion of treatment. Results: Compared to the control group, the experimental group had significantly better scores on the PSQI (t = -7.72, P < 0.001) and SF-36 (t = 1.34, P < 0.001) during the intervention period. The improvements in the PSQI and SF-36 scores were still significant (P < 0.001) after adjusting for confounding variables by generalized estimating equations. Conclusions: Results suggest that acupressure on the Tian-Zhu, Ju-Que, Yong-Quan, Bai-Hui, and Nei-Guan acupoints can improve the quality of sleep and life among NH residents. Acupressure is a promising intervention that may improve well-being for NH residents with sleep disturbances.

AB - Objectives: Nursing home (NH) residents suffer from sleep disturbances which are associated with a low quality of life (QoL). The purpose of this study was to explore the effectiveness of comparing acupressure on specific acupoints with acupressure on non-specific acupoints in older NH residents with sleep disturbances. Design: A randomized control trial with a pre- and post-test design. Setting: One NH in Taiwan. Participants: Sixty-two older NH residents were randomly assigned to an experimental group (n = 31) and a sham-controlled group (n = 31). Intervention: The experimental group received acupressure on the Tian-Zhu, Ju-Que, Yong-Quan, Bai-Hui, and Nei-Guan acupoints three times a week for 8 weeks, for 24 minutes each time, while the control group received a massage at locations with no acupoints, which were 10 mm from the true points, at the same frequency as the experimental group. Measurements: The primary outcome was measured using the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) and the secondary outcome was measured using the Short-form 36 (SF-36). Data were collected at baseline, the end of treatment, and 4 weeks after completion of treatment. Results: Compared to the control group, the experimental group had significantly better scores on the PSQI (t = -7.72, P < 0.001) and SF-36 (t = 1.34, P < 0.001) during the intervention period. The improvements in the PSQI and SF-36 scores were still significant (P < 0.001) after adjusting for confounding variables by generalized estimating equations. Conclusions: Results suggest that acupressure on the Tian-Zhu, Ju-Que, Yong-Quan, Bai-Hui, and Nei-Guan acupoints can improve the quality of sleep and life among NH residents. Acupressure is a promising intervention that may improve well-being for NH residents with sleep disturbances.

KW - Acupressure

KW - Complementary therapies

KW - Sleep disturbances

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85011685181&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85011685181&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1111/jgs.14729

DO - 10.1111/jgs.14729

M3 - Article

C2 - 28152177

AN - SCOPUS:85011685181

JO - Journal of the American Geriatrics Society

JF - Journal of the American Geriatrics Society

SN - 0002-8614

ER -