Active site engineering on two-dimensional-layered transition metal dichalcogenides for electrochemical energy applications: A mini-review

Chueh An Chen, Chiao Lin Lee, Po Kang Yang, Dung Sheng Tsai, Chuan Pei Lee

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Two-dimensional-layered transition metal dichalcogenides (2D-layered TMDs) are a chemically diverse class of compounds having variable band gaps and remarkable electrochemical properties, which make them potential materials for applications in the field of electrochemical energy. To date, 2D-layered TMDs have been wildly used in water-splitting systems, dye-sensitized solar cells, supercapacitors, and some catalysis systems, etc., and the pertinent devices exhibit good performances. However, several reports have also indicated that the active sites for catalytic reaction are mainly located on the edge sites of 2D-layered TMDs, and their basal plane shows poor activity toward catalysis reaction. Accordingly, many studies have reported various approaches, namely active-site engineering, to address this issue, including plasma treatment, edge site formation, heteroatom-doping, nano-sized TMD pieces, highly curved structures, and surface modification via nano-sized catalyst decoration, etc. In this article, we provide a short review for the active-site engineering on 2D-layered TMDs and their applications in electrochemical energy. Finally, the future perspectives for 2D-layered TMD catalysts will also be briefly discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Article number151
Pages (from-to)1-16
Number of pages16
JournalCatalysts
Volume11
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2021

Keywords

  • Active site
  • Catalysis
  • Electrochemical energy
  • Transition metal dichalcogenides
  • Two-dimensional materials

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Catalysis
  • Physical and Theoretical Chemistry

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