2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: No evidence exists from randomized trials to support using cloud-based manometers integrated with available physician order entry systems for tracking patient blood pressure (BP) to assist in the control of renal function deterioration. We investigated how integrating cloud-based manometers with physician order entry systems benefits our outpatient chronic kidney disease patients compared with typical BP tracking systems. Methods: We randomly assigned 36 chronic kidney disease patients to use cloud-based manometers integrated with physician order entry systems or typical BP recording sheets, and followed the patients for 6 months. The composite outcome was that the patients saw improvement both in BP and renal function. Results: We compared the systolic and diastolic BP (SBP and DBP), and renal function of our patients at 0 months, 3 months, and 6 months after using the integrated manometers and typical BP monitoring sheets. Nighttime SBP and DBP were significantly lower in the study group compared with the control group. Serum creatinine level in the study group improved significantly compared with the control group after the end of Month 6 (2.83±2.0 vs. 4.38±3.0, p=0.018). Proteinuria improved nonsignificantly in Month 6 in the study group compared with the control group (1.05±0.9 vs. 1.90±1.3, p=0.09). Both SBP and DBP during the nighttime hours improved significantly in the study group compared with the baseline. Conclusion: In pre-end-stage renal disease patients, regularly monitoring BP by integrating cloud-based manometers appears to result in a significant decrease in creatinine and improvement in nighttime BP control. Estimated glomerular filtration rate and proteinuria were found to be improved nonsignificantly, and thus, larger population and longer follow-up studies may be needed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)642-647
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of the Chinese Medical Association
Volume77
Issue number12
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 1 2014

Fingerprint

Blood Pressure
Physicians
Kidney
Chronic Renal Insufficiency
Proteinuria
Control Groups
Creatinine
Patient Identification Systems
Physiologic Monitoring
Glomerular Filtration Rate
Chronic Kidney Failure
Outpatients
Serum
Population

Keywords

  • Blood pressure monitoring
  • Chronic kidney disease
  • Cloud-based manometers integrated to physician order entry systems
  • Usual blood pressure record sheets

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

A study of renal function influence by integrating cloud-based manometers and physician order entry systems. / Lin, Yuh Feng; Sheng, Li Huei; Wu, Mei Yi; Zheng, Cai Mei; Chang, Tian Jong; Li, Yu Chuan; Huang, Yu Hui; Lu, Hsi Peng.

In: Journal of the Chinese Medical Association, Vol. 77, No. 12, 01.12.2014, p. 642-647.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{d984bdec632347308ebe0c1568ff8a1b,
title = "A study of renal function influence by integrating cloud-based manometers and physician order entry systems",
abstract = "Background: No evidence exists from randomized trials to support using cloud-based manometers integrated with available physician order entry systems for tracking patient blood pressure (BP) to assist in the control of renal function deterioration. We investigated how integrating cloud-based manometers with physician order entry systems benefits our outpatient chronic kidney disease patients compared with typical BP tracking systems. Methods: We randomly assigned 36 chronic kidney disease patients to use cloud-based manometers integrated with physician order entry systems or typical BP recording sheets, and followed the patients for 6 months. The composite outcome was that the patients saw improvement both in BP and renal function. Results: We compared the systolic and diastolic BP (SBP and DBP), and renal function of our patients at 0 months, 3 months, and 6 months after using the integrated manometers and typical BP monitoring sheets. Nighttime SBP and DBP were significantly lower in the study group compared with the control group. Serum creatinine level in the study group improved significantly compared with the control group after the end of Month 6 (2.83±2.0 vs. 4.38±3.0, p=0.018). Proteinuria improved nonsignificantly in Month 6 in the study group compared with the control group (1.05±0.9 vs. 1.90±1.3, p=0.09). Both SBP and DBP during the nighttime hours improved significantly in the study group compared with the baseline. Conclusion: In pre-end-stage renal disease patients, regularly monitoring BP by integrating cloud-based manometers appears to result in a significant decrease in creatinine and improvement in nighttime BP control. Estimated glomerular filtration rate and proteinuria were found to be improved nonsignificantly, and thus, larger population and longer follow-up studies may be needed.",
keywords = "Blood pressure monitoring, Chronic kidney disease, Cloud-based manometers integrated to physician order entry systems, Usual blood pressure record sheets",
author = "Lin, {Yuh Feng} and Sheng, {Li Huei} and Wu, {Mei Yi} and Zheng, {Cai Mei} and Chang, {Tian Jong} and Li, {Yu Chuan} and Huang, {Yu Hui} and Lu, {Hsi Peng}",
year = "2014",
month = "12",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.jcma.2014.08.012",
language = "English",
volume = "77",
pages = "642--647",
journal = "Journal of the Chinese Medical Association",
issn = "1726-4901",
publisher = "Elsevier Taiwan LLC",
number = "12",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - A study of renal function influence by integrating cloud-based manometers and physician order entry systems

AU - Lin, Yuh Feng

AU - Sheng, Li Huei

AU - Wu, Mei Yi

AU - Zheng, Cai Mei

AU - Chang, Tian Jong

AU - Li, Yu Chuan

AU - Huang, Yu Hui

AU - Lu, Hsi Peng

PY - 2014/12/1

Y1 - 2014/12/1

N2 - Background: No evidence exists from randomized trials to support using cloud-based manometers integrated with available physician order entry systems for tracking patient blood pressure (BP) to assist in the control of renal function deterioration. We investigated how integrating cloud-based manometers with physician order entry systems benefits our outpatient chronic kidney disease patients compared with typical BP tracking systems. Methods: We randomly assigned 36 chronic kidney disease patients to use cloud-based manometers integrated with physician order entry systems or typical BP recording sheets, and followed the patients for 6 months. The composite outcome was that the patients saw improvement both in BP and renal function. Results: We compared the systolic and diastolic BP (SBP and DBP), and renal function of our patients at 0 months, 3 months, and 6 months after using the integrated manometers and typical BP monitoring sheets. Nighttime SBP and DBP were significantly lower in the study group compared with the control group. Serum creatinine level in the study group improved significantly compared with the control group after the end of Month 6 (2.83±2.0 vs. 4.38±3.0, p=0.018). Proteinuria improved nonsignificantly in Month 6 in the study group compared with the control group (1.05±0.9 vs. 1.90±1.3, p=0.09). Both SBP and DBP during the nighttime hours improved significantly in the study group compared with the baseline. Conclusion: In pre-end-stage renal disease patients, regularly monitoring BP by integrating cloud-based manometers appears to result in a significant decrease in creatinine and improvement in nighttime BP control. Estimated glomerular filtration rate and proteinuria were found to be improved nonsignificantly, and thus, larger population and longer follow-up studies may be needed.

AB - Background: No evidence exists from randomized trials to support using cloud-based manometers integrated with available physician order entry systems for tracking patient blood pressure (BP) to assist in the control of renal function deterioration. We investigated how integrating cloud-based manometers with physician order entry systems benefits our outpatient chronic kidney disease patients compared with typical BP tracking systems. Methods: We randomly assigned 36 chronic kidney disease patients to use cloud-based manometers integrated with physician order entry systems or typical BP recording sheets, and followed the patients for 6 months. The composite outcome was that the patients saw improvement both in BP and renal function. Results: We compared the systolic and diastolic BP (SBP and DBP), and renal function of our patients at 0 months, 3 months, and 6 months after using the integrated manometers and typical BP monitoring sheets. Nighttime SBP and DBP were significantly lower in the study group compared with the control group. Serum creatinine level in the study group improved significantly compared with the control group after the end of Month 6 (2.83±2.0 vs. 4.38±3.0, p=0.018). Proteinuria improved nonsignificantly in Month 6 in the study group compared with the control group (1.05±0.9 vs. 1.90±1.3, p=0.09). Both SBP and DBP during the nighttime hours improved significantly in the study group compared with the baseline. Conclusion: In pre-end-stage renal disease patients, regularly monitoring BP by integrating cloud-based manometers appears to result in a significant decrease in creatinine and improvement in nighttime BP control. Estimated glomerular filtration rate and proteinuria were found to be improved nonsignificantly, and thus, larger population and longer follow-up studies may be needed.

KW - Blood pressure monitoring

KW - Chronic kidney disease

KW - Cloud-based manometers integrated to physician order entry systems

KW - Usual blood pressure record sheets

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84915805534&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84915805534&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.jcma.2014.08.012

DO - 10.1016/j.jcma.2014.08.012

M3 - Article

VL - 77

SP - 642

EP - 647

JO - Journal of the Chinese Medical Association

JF - Journal of the Chinese Medical Association

SN - 1726-4901

IS - 12

ER -