A simple protocol for the management of deep sternal surgical site infection: A retrospective study of twenty-five cases

Yu Jen Shih, Shun Cheng Chang, Chih Hsin Wang, Niann Tzyy Dai, Shyi Gen Chen, Tim Mo Chen, Yuan Sheng Tzeng

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Deep sternal incisional surgical site infection is a serious and potentially life-threatening complication after open heart surgery. Although a rare post-operative complication, the rates of post-operative morbidity and mortality are greater in patients who develop a deep sternal incisional surgical site infection than in those who do not. Methods: We evaluated retrospectively the results of patients who developed a deep sternal incisional surgical site infection who were treated with either a pectoralis major flap or delayed primary closure after previous negative-pressure wound therapy (NWPT). From July 2007 to July 2012, 25 patients had a deep sternal incisional surgical site infection after open heart surgery in the Departments of Plastic Surgery and Cardiac Surgery of the Tri-Service General Hospital Medical Center. Sternal refixation was not performed in our patients. Results: In 15 patients, a unilateral or bilateral pectoralis major advancement flap with a myocutaneous or muscle flap was used. In seven patients, delayed primary closure was performed after NPWT. One patient received a rectus abdominis myocutaneous flap and another received a free anterior lateral thigh flap. One patient died after developing nosocomial pneumonia with severe sepsis after debridement. Conclusions: In our series, no patient required sternal re-fixation. Our findings suggest that delayed primary closure and use of a unilateral or bilateral pectoralis major flap following NPWT for a deep sternal incisional surgical site infection are simple and quick methods for managing such difficult surgical incisions even if the deep sternal surgical site infection is located in the lower one-third of the sternum.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)815-820
Number of pages6
JournalSurgical Infections
Volume15
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 1 2014
Externally publishedYes

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Surgical Wound Infection
Retrospective Studies
Thoracic Surgery
Negative-Pressure Wound Therapy
Rectus Abdominis
Sternum
Myocutaneous Flap
Debridement
Plastic Surgery
Thigh
General Hospitals
Sepsis
Pneumonia
Morbidity
Muscles

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Microbiology (medical)
  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

A simple protocol for the management of deep sternal surgical site infection : A retrospective study of twenty-five cases. / Shih, Yu Jen; Chang, Shun Cheng; Wang, Chih Hsin; Dai, Niann Tzyy; Chen, Shyi Gen; Chen, Tim Mo; Tzeng, Yuan Sheng.

In: Surgical Infections, Vol. 15, No. 6, 01.12.2014, p. 815-820.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Shih, Yu Jen ; Chang, Shun Cheng ; Wang, Chih Hsin ; Dai, Niann Tzyy ; Chen, Shyi Gen ; Chen, Tim Mo ; Tzeng, Yuan Sheng. / A simple protocol for the management of deep sternal surgical site infection : A retrospective study of twenty-five cases. In: Surgical Infections. 2014 ; Vol. 15, No. 6. pp. 815-820.
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